ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength

(HealthDay News) -- Regular participation in community exercise programs can help older adults boost their upper- and lower-body strength.

So says a U.S. study that included 544 people, average age 66, who took part in three nationally-recognized workout programs for older adults.

The participants were evaluated before they started the exercise programs and at 5- and 10-month intervals. There were no significant changes in certain areas, such as body weight or general health, but participants in the exercise programs increased the frequency of their total physical activity by 26 percent, compared with 9 percent for members of a control group.

The study authors also found that after five months, participants in the exercise programs showed a 19 percent increase in the number of stands per minute they could do in the sit-stand test -- from 26 per minute to 31 per minute.

There were also improvements in the arm-curl test. Before the exercise program, participants averaged 15 arm curls in 30 seconds. That increased to 18 in 30 seconds after 5 months (a 22 percent increase) and to 20 in 30 seconds (a 33 percent increase) after 10 months of doing an exercise program.

The findings, expected to be published in the February issue of the American Journal of Public Health, indicate these exercise programs could reduce seniors' risk of falls. These types of exercise programs should be encouraged and supported because their cost is relatively low compared to that of medical care, the researchers said.

Despite the known benefits of exercise, more than 60 percent of older adults don't get consistent workouts, noted study lead author Susan Hughes, of the Center for Research on Health and Aging at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

"Some do not participate, because they may not realize that exercise still provides benefits at older ages; some have chronic conditions that they worry could be made worse by exercise; and some can't find a good program at a good price at a convenient location," Hughes said in a Center for the Advancement of Health news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about exercise for seniors.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Center for the Advancement of Health, news release, Dec. 9, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 19, 2008

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