ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
EYE CARE, VISION
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Add your Article

Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength

(HealthDay News) -- Regular participation in community exercise programs can help older adults boost their upper- and lower-body strength.

So says a U.S. study that included 544 people, average age 66, who took part in three nationally-recognized workout programs for older adults.

The participants were evaluated before they started the exercise programs and at 5- and 10-month intervals. There were no significant changes in certain areas, such as body weight or general health, but participants in the exercise programs increased the frequency of their total physical activity by 26 percent, compared with 9 percent for members of a control group.

The study authors also found that after five months, participants in the exercise programs showed a 19 percent increase in the number of stands per minute they could do in the sit-stand test -- from 26 per minute to 31 per minute.

There were also improvements in the arm-curl test. Before the exercise program, participants averaged 15 arm curls in 30 seconds. That increased to 18 in 30 seconds after 5 months (a 22 percent increase) and to 20 in 30 seconds (a 33 percent increase) after 10 months of doing an exercise program.

The findings, expected to be published in the February issue of the American Journal of Public Health, indicate these exercise programs could reduce seniors' risk of falls. These types of exercise programs should be encouraged and supported because their cost is relatively low compared to that of medical care, the researchers said.

Despite the known benefits of exercise, more than 60 percent of older adults don't get consistent workouts, noted study lead author Susan Hughes, of the Center for Research on Health and Aging at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

"Some do not participate, because they may not realize that exercise still provides benefits at older ages; some have chronic conditions that they worry could be made worse by exercise; and some can't find a good program at a good price at a convenient location," Hughes said in a Center for the Advancement of Health news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about exercise for seniors.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Center for the Advancement of Health, news release, Dec. 9, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 19, 2008

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