ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Winter Is Tough on Feet
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
CANCER
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Any Old Cane Won't Do
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- A key compound in red wine known as resveratrol appears to protect against many of the health ravages associated with growing old, new animal research reveals.

"It's very hard to extrapolate from this finding to comment on the benefits of red wine directly, because red wine has many other compounds besides resveratrol, including ethanol, which have very active biological effects," noted study author Rafael de Cabo, unit chief of the laboratory of experimental gerontology at the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore.

"But red wine is a good source of resveratrol," he added. "And, in this mouse study, we have shown that this particular compound has very strong positive effects on preventing cardiovascular disease, reducing heart inflammation, keeping bone health in terms of structure and function, and maintaining loco-motor and balance activity. So, if these effects translate into humans, it will have a very good impact on the standard of human health."

De Cabo conducted the research with David A. Sinclair, of Harvard Medical School. Their team is publishing its findings in the July 3 online issue of Cell Metabolism.

Daily consumption of the compound -- also found in the skin of grapes and the crust of peanuts and walnuts -- broadly improved the long-term quality of life of middle-aged mice, although most mice did not end up living longer.

Nevertheless, the age-defying health benefits of resveratrol closely mimicked those previously associated with rigorous calorie-restricted diets -- raising hopes for simpler and easier means by which to help fight off age-related decline.

The authors noted that prior research has touted the healthy benefits associated with daily caloric restriction of between 30 percent and 50 percent below average, as well as with fasting every other day. Such diets have been linked to a reduction in the risk for age-associated disease and stress, alongside a slowing of age-related functional decline.

"But we can't have half of America going permanently on a diet," said de Cabo. "We just can't do it. It's not practical, and it's not going to happen."

Alternatively, he and his colleagues began to explore the potential of resveratrol -- a compound that has already been shown to extend the lives of yeast, worms, flies and fish.

In initial studies, the team found that consuming the compound did improve the health and survival of obese mice -- despite consuming a high-calorie diet.

To follow up, the researchers now compared the health and life spans of middle-age mice given either a standard diet or a calorie-restricted diet, with or without high or low daily dosages of resveratrol.

De Cabo and his colleagues found that resveratrol had the same positive impact on mouse livers, muscles, hearts and bones as calorie restriction alone.

Regardless of dietary protocol, the general health and vigor of mice on a long-term regimen (approximately one year) of resveratrol improved overall, without apparent side effects. However, only mice consuming resveratrol alongside a high-calorie diet were found to actually live longer.

"This certainly is consistent with previous studies," noted Dr. Edward A. Fisher, a professor of cardiovascular medicine and cell biology at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City. "So, I'm not surprised by the finding."

"But by looking at specific outcomes in specific tissues, this work is certainly more detailed and rigorous," he added. "And it further supports the hypothesis that this compound staves off the effects of aging."

On another food front, researchers out of Athens Medical School in Greece have published a new study in the current issue of the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation suggesting that drinking green tea is good for the heart.

Consuming green tea, the authors noted, appeared to quickly improve the function of cells that line the circulatory system, known as endothelial cells. Because endothelial cell damage is a key contributor to the onset of atherosclerosis, boosting the performance of such cells could help stave off heart disease.

More information

For additional information on health benefits associated with red wine and resveratrol, visit the Mayo Clinic.



SOURCES: Rafael de Cabo, Ph.D., investigator and unit chief, laboratory of experimental gerontology, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore; Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., professor, cardiovascular medicine and cell biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; July 3, 2008, Cell Metabolism, online

Last Updated: July 03, 2008

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