ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
CANCER
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
What you need to know about swine flu.
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- A key compound in red wine known as resveratrol appears to protect against many of the health ravages associated with growing old, new animal research reveals.

"It's very hard to extrapolate from this finding to comment on the benefits of red wine directly, because red wine has many other compounds besides resveratrol, including ethanol, which have very active biological effects," noted study author Rafael de Cabo, unit chief of the laboratory of experimental gerontology at the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore.

"But red wine is a good source of resveratrol," he added. "And, in this mouse study, we have shown that this particular compound has very strong positive effects on preventing cardiovascular disease, reducing heart inflammation, keeping bone health in terms of structure and function, and maintaining loco-motor and balance activity. So, if these effects translate into humans, it will have a very good impact on the standard of human health."

De Cabo conducted the research with David A. Sinclair, of Harvard Medical School. Their team is publishing its findings in the July 3 online issue of Cell Metabolism.

Daily consumption of the compound -- also found in the skin of grapes and the crust of peanuts and walnuts -- broadly improved the long-term quality of life of middle-aged mice, although most mice did not end up living longer.

Nevertheless, the age-defying health benefits of resveratrol closely mimicked those previously associated with rigorous calorie-restricted diets -- raising hopes for simpler and easier means by which to help fight off age-related decline.

The authors noted that prior research has touted the healthy benefits associated with daily caloric restriction of between 30 percent and 50 percent below average, as well as with fasting every other day. Such diets have been linked to a reduction in the risk for age-associated disease and stress, alongside a slowing of age-related functional decline.

"But we can't have half of America going permanently on a diet," said de Cabo. "We just can't do it. It's not practical, and it's not going to happen."

Alternatively, he and his colleagues began to explore the potential of resveratrol -- a compound that has already been shown to extend the lives of yeast, worms, flies and fish.

In initial studies, the team found that consuming the compound did improve the health and survival of obese mice -- despite consuming a high-calorie diet.

To follow up, the researchers now compared the health and life spans of middle-age mice given either a standard diet or a calorie-restricted diet, with or without high or low daily dosages of resveratrol.

De Cabo and his colleagues found that resveratrol had the same positive impact on mouse livers, muscles, hearts and bones as calorie restriction alone.

Regardless of dietary protocol, the general health and vigor of mice on a long-term regimen (approximately one year) of resveratrol improved overall, without apparent side effects. However, only mice consuming resveratrol alongside a high-calorie diet were found to actually live longer.

"This certainly is consistent with previous studies," noted Dr. Edward A. Fisher, a professor of cardiovascular medicine and cell biology at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City. "So, I'm not surprised by the finding."

"But by looking at specific outcomes in specific tissues, this work is certainly more detailed and rigorous," he added. "And it further supports the hypothesis that this compound staves off the effects of aging."

On another food front, researchers out of Athens Medical School in Greece have published a new study in the current issue of the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation suggesting that drinking green tea is good for the heart.

Consuming green tea, the authors noted, appeared to quickly improve the function of cells that line the circulatory system, known as endothelial cells. Because endothelial cell damage is a key contributor to the onset of atherosclerosis, boosting the performance of such cells could help stave off heart disease.

More information

For additional information on health benefits associated with red wine and resveratrol, visit the Mayo Clinic.



SOURCES: Rafael de Cabo, Ph.D., investigator and unit chief, laboratory of experimental gerontology, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore; Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., professor, cardiovascular medicine and cell biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; July 3, 2008, Cell Metabolism, online

Last Updated: July 03, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com