ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
CANCER
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
MEN'S HEALTH
Countdown to Hair Loss
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
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Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- A key compound in red wine known as resveratrol appears to protect against many of the health ravages associated with growing old, new animal research reveals.

"It's very hard to extrapolate from this finding to comment on the benefits of red wine directly, because red wine has many other compounds besides resveratrol, including ethanol, which have very active biological effects," noted study author Rafael de Cabo, unit chief of the laboratory of experimental gerontology at the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore.

"But red wine is a good source of resveratrol," he added. "And, in this mouse study, we have shown that this particular compound has very strong positive effects on preventing cardiovascular disease, reducing heart inflammation, keeping bone health in terms of structure and function, and maintaining loco-motor and balance activity. So, if these effects translate into humans, it will have a very good impact on the standard of human health."

De Cabo conducted the research with David A. Sinclair, of Harvard Medical School. Their team is publishing its findings in the July 3 online issue of Cell Metabolism.

Daily consumption of the compound -- also found in the skin of grapes and the crust of peanuts and walnuts -- broadly improved the long-term quality of life of middle-aged mice, although most mice did not end up living longer.

Nevertheless, the age-defying health benefits of resveratrol closely mimicked those previously associated with rigorous calorie-restricted diets -- raising hopes for simpler and easier means by which to help fight off age-related decline.

The authors noted that prior research has touted the healthy benefits associated with daily caloric restriction of between 30 percent and 50 percent below average, as well as with fasting every other day. Such diets have been linked to a reduction in the risk for age-associated disease and stress, alongside a slowing of age-related functional decline.

"But we can't have half of America going permanently on a diet," said de Cabo. "We just can't do it. It's not practical, and it's not going to happen."

Alternatively, he and his colleagues began to explore the potential of resveratrol -- a compound that has already been shown to extend the lives of yeast, worms, flies and fish.

In initial studies, the team found that consuming the compound did improve the health and survival of obese mice -- despite consuming a high-calorie diet.

To follow up, the researchers now compared the health and life spans of middle-age mice given either a standard diet or a calorie-restricted diet, with or without high or low daily dosages of resveratrol.

De Cabo and his colleagues found that resveratrol had the same positive impact on mouse livers, muscles, hearts and bones as calorie restriction alone.

Regardless of dietary protocol, the general health and vigor of mice on a long-term regimen (approximately one year) of resveratrol improved overall, without apparent side effects. However, only mice consuming resveratrol alongside a high-calorie diet were found to actually live longer.

"This certainly is consistent with previous studies," noted Dr. Edward A. Fisher, a professor of cardiovascular medicine and cell biology at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City. "So, I'm not surprised by the finding."

"But by looking at specific outcomes in specific tissues, this work is certainly more detailed and rigorous," he added. "And it further supports the hypothesis that this compound staves off the effects of aging."

On another food front, researchers out of Athens Medical School in Greece have published a new study in the current issue of the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation suggesting that drinking green tea is good for the heart.

Consuming green tea, the authors noted, appeared to quickly improve the function of cells that line the circulatory system, known as endothelial cells. Because endothelial cell damage is a key contributor to the onset of atherosclerosis, boosting the performance of such cells could help stave off heart disease.

More information

For additional information on health benefits associated with red wine and resveratrol, visit the Mayo Clinic.



SOURCES: Rafael de Cabo, Ph.D., investigator and unit chief, laboratory of experimental gerontology, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore; Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., professor, cardiovascular medicine and cell biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; July 3, 2008, Cell Metabolism, online

Last Updated: July 03, 2008

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