ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
The Raw Food Diet
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
FITNESS
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Food and Water Supply Poisoned by Perchlorate
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image

THURSDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to glasses, contact lenses improve how children feel about their appearance, their ability to play sports and their acceptance among friends, a study of 484 nearsighted children finds.

"Many studies have examined the effect of spectacle wear on self-perception and the perception of others, but the majority of this research has been conducted on adults," study leader Jeffrey J. Walline, from Ohio State University's College of Optometry, said in an American Academy of Optometry news release. "Research shows spectacles to be associated with poorer self-perception in adults if they were first worn during childhood."

The children in this study, aged 8 to 11, were randomly assigned to wear either glasses (237) or contact lenses (247) for three years. Over that time, the researchers checked for changes in the children's self-perception in areas such as social acceptance, academic competence, athletic competence, physical appearance and behavioral conduct.

By the end of the study, children with contact lenses had significantly higher scores of self-perceived physical appearance, athletic competence and social acceptance. Academic confidence was higher for contact lens wearers who initially disliked wearing glasses.

The study, published in the March issue of Optometry and Vision Science, received funding from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Inc. and The Vision Care Institute, LLC, a Johnson & Johnson Co.

"Published studies have shown glasses to be associated with negative attributes in areas of self-perception and attractiveness, so it was not surprising that children's physical appearance self-perception benefits from contact lens wear," study co-author Mitchell J. Prinstein, director of clinical physiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in the news release.

The finding that children wearing contact lenses felt better about their athletic ability "are consistent with the growing body of research in this area demonstrating that contact lenses significantly improve how children feel about participating in activities such as sports," Walline noted.

"Anecdotally, children may participate in recreational activities without vision correction rather than risk breaking their glasses. Unlike glasses, contact lenses provide clear vision without impairing peripheral vision, so children may feel that their athletic competence improves, because they can see more clearly while participating in recreational activities," he said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children's vision.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Optometry, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 05, 2009

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