ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
CANCER
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Add your Article

Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image

THURSDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to glasses, contact lenses improve how children feel about their appearance, their ability to play sports and their acceptance among friends, a study of 484 nearsighted children finds.

"Many studies have examined the effect of spectacle wear on self-perception and the perception of others, but the majority of this research has been conducted on adults," study leader Jeffrey J. Walline, from Ohio State University's College of Optometry, said in an American Academy of Optometry news release. "Research shows spectacles to be associated with poorer self-perception in adults if they were first worn during childhood."

The children in this study, aged 8 to 11, were randomly assigned to wear either glasses (237) or contact lenses (247) for three years. Over that time, the researchers checked for changes in the children's self-perception in areas such as social acceptance, academic competence, athletic competence, physical appearance and behavioral conduct.

By the end of the study, children with contact lenses had significantly higher scores of self-perceived physical appearance, athletic competence and social acceptance. Academic confidence was higher for contact lens wearers who initially disliked wearing glasses.

The study, published in the March issue of Optometry and Vision Science, received funding from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Inc. and The Vision Care Institute, LLC, a Johnson & Johnson Co.

"Published studies have shown glasses to be associated with negative attributes in areas of self-perception and attractiveness, so it was not surprising that children's physical appearance self-perception benefits from contact lens wear," study co-author Mitchell J. Prinstein, director of clinical physiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in the news release.

The finding that children wearing contact lenses felt better about their athletic ability "are consistent with the growing body of research in this area demonstrating that contact lenses significantly improve how children feel about participating in activities such as sports," Walline noted.

"Anecdotally, children may participate in recreational activities without vision correction rather than risk breaking their glasses. Unlike glasses, contact lenses provide clear vision without impairing peripheral vision, so children may feel that their athletic competence improves, because they can see more clearly while participating in recreational activities," he said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children's vision.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Optometry, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 05, 2009

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