ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
CANCER
Healthy Behaviors Slow Functional Decline After Cancer
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
EYE CARE, VISION
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
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Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image

THURSDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to glasses, contact lenses improve how children feel about their appearance, their ability to play sports and their acceptance among friends, a study of 484 nearsighted children finds.

"Many studies have examined the effect of spectacle wear on self-perception and the perception of others, but the majority of this research has been conducted on adults," study leader Jeffrey J. Walline, from Ohio State University's College of Optometry, said in an American Academy of Optometry news release. "Research shows spectacles to be associated with poorer self-perception in adults if they were first worn during childhood."

The children in this study, aged 8 to 11, were randomly assigned to wear either glasses (237) or contact lenses (247) for three years. Over that time, the researchers checked for changes in the children's self-perception in areas such as social acceptance, academic competence, athletic competence, physical appearance and behavioral conduct.

By the end of the study, children with contact lenses had significantly higher scores of self-perceived physical appearance, athletic competence and social acceptance. Academic confidence was higher for contact lens wearers who initially disliked wearing glasses.

The study, published in the March issue of Optometry and Vision Science, received funding from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Inc. and The Vision Care Institute, LLC, a Johnson & Johnson Co.

"Published studies have shown glasses to be associated with negative attributes in areas of self-perception and attractiveness, so it was not surprising that children's physical appearance self-perception benefits from contact lens wear," study co-author Mitchell J. Prinstein, director of clinical physiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in the news release.

The finding that children wearing contact lenses felt better about their athletic ability "are consistent with the growing body of research in this area demonstrating that contact lenses significantly improve how children feel about participating in activities such as sports," Walline noted.

"Anecdotally, children may participate in recreational activities without vision correction rather than risk breaking their glasses. Unlike glasses, contact lenses provide clear vision without impairing peripheral vision, so children may feel that their athletic competence improves, because they can see more clearly while participating in recreational activities," he said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children's vision.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Optometry, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 05, 2009

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