ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Pain More a Cause of Arthritis Than a Symptom
CANCER
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Add your Article

Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image

THURSDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to glasses, contact lenses improve how children feel about their appearance, their ability to play sports and their acceptance among friends, a study of 484 nearsighted children finds.

"Many studies have examined the effect of spectacle wear on self-perception and the perception of others, but the majority of this research has been conducted on adults," study leader Jeffrey J. Walline, from Ohio State University's College of Optometry, said in an American Academy of Optometry news release. "Research shows spectacles to be associated with poorer self-perception in adults if they were first worn during childhood."

The children in this study, aged 8 to 11, were randomly assigned to wear either glasses (237) or contact lenses (247) for three years. Over that time, the researchers checked for changes in the children's self-perception in areas such as social acceptance, academic competence, athletic competence, physical appearance and behavioral conduct.

By the end of the study, children with contact lenses had significantly higher scores of self-perceived physical appearance, athletic competence and social acceptance. Academic confidence was higher for contact lens wearers who initially disliked wearing glasses.

The study, published in the March issue of Optometry and Vision Science, received funding from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Inc. and The Vision Care Institute, LLC, a Johnson & Johnson Co.

"Published studies have shown glasses to be associated with negative attributes in areas of self-perception and attractiveness, so it was not surprising that children's physical appearance self-perception benefits from contact lens wear," study co-author Mitchell J. Prinstein, director of clinical physiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in the news release.

The finding that children wearing contact lenses felt better about their athletic ability "are consistent with the growing body of research in this area demonstrating that contact lenses significantly improve how children feel about participating in activities such as sports," Walline noted.

"Anecdotally, children may participate in recreational activities without vision correction rather than risk breaking their glasses. Unlike glasses, contact lenses provide clear vision without impairing peripheral vision, so children may feel that their athletic competence improves, because they can see more clearly while participating in recreational activities," he said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children's vision.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Optometry, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 05, 2009

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