ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
EYE CARE, VISION
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Barefoot Best for Running?
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Add your Article

Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image

THURSDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to glasses, contact lenses improve how children feel about their appearance, their ability to play sports and their acceptance among friends, a study of 484 nearsighted children finds.

"Many studies have examined the effect of spectacle wear on self-perception and the perception of others, but the majority of this research has been conducted on adults," study leader Jeffrey J. Walline, from Ohio State University's College of Optometry, said in an American Academy of Optometry news release. "Research shows spectacles to be associated with poorer self-perception in adults if they were first worn during childhood."

The children in this study, aged 8 to 11, were randomly assigned to wear either glasses (237) or contact lenses (247) for three years. Over that time, the researchers checked for changes in the children's self-perception in areas such as social acceptance, academic competence, athletic competence, physical appearance and behavioral conduct.

By the end of the study, children with contact lenses had significantly higher scores of self-perceived physical appearance, athletic competence and social acceptance. Academic confidence was higher for contact lens wearers who initially disliked wearing glasses.

The study, published in the March issue of Optometry and Vision Science, received funding from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Inc. and The Vision Care Institute, LLC, a Johnson & Johnson Co.

"Published studies have shown glasses to be associated with negative attributes in areas of self-perception and attractiveness, so it was not surprising that children's physical appearance self-perception benefits from contact lens wear," study co-author Mitchell J. Prinstein, director of clinical physiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, said in the news release.

The finding that children wearing contact lenses felt better about their athletic ability "are consistent with the growing body of research in this area demonstrating that contact lenses significantly improve how children feel about participating in activities such as sports," Walline noted.

"Anecdotally, children may participate in recreational activities without vision correction rather than risk breaking their glasses. Unlike glasses, contact lenses provide clear vision without impairing peripheral vision, so children may feel that their athletic competence improves, because they can see more clearly while participating in recreational activities," he said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children's vision.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Academy of Optometry, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 05, 2009

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