ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
CAREGIVING
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Drink Away Dementia?
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
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Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment

FRIDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- Better coordination between paramedics, emergency room staff and laboratory personnel has led to steady improvements in the time needed to restore blood flow to people having a severe heart attack, new research shows.

The study involved patients who had what's known as an ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the deadliest type of heart attack. They were treated initially at a major North Carolina medical center or transferred there from other area hospitals.

Researchers compared data from four time periods spanning from before the new practices were put into place in 2005 through mid-2008.

Measurements included how much time elapsed between a patient arriving at the hospital and having medications initiated (called door-to-needle, in hospital parlance) and the time from hospital arrival to angioplasty, a procedure to open a blocked blood vessel (called door-to-balloon).

"Significant reductions in treatment times across all measured parameters between pre- and post-intervention phases were noted," the researchers said in a news release from the American Heart Association. "Continuing statistically significant improvements were seen after completion of the official study period in door-to-needle as well as door-to-balloon and patient transfer times."

The study was to be presented Friday at American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

Every year, about 400,000 Americans experience a STEMI heart attack. STEMI, which affects a large area of the heart, carries a high risk of mortality and disability.

The study showed that better coordination can shorten the time to beginning coronary reperfusion -- techniques and treatments such as clot-dissolving drugs, angioplasty or surgery -- used to restore blood flow to the part of the heart muscle damaged during a heart attack. The finding "strongly favors the establishment of formal regional STEMI care networks," the researchers said.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on STEMI.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 24, 2009

Last Updated: April 24, 2009

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