ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
CAREGIVING
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin E Helps Treat Common Liver Disease
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment

FRIDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- Better coordination between paramedics, emergency room staff and laboratory personnel has led to steady improvements in the time needed to restore blood flow to people having a severe heart attack, new research shows.

The study involved patients who had what's known as an ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the deadliest type of heart attack. They were treated initially at a major North Carolina medical center or transferred there from other area hospitals.

Researchers compared data from four time periods spanning from before the new practices were put into place in 2005 through mid-2008.

Measurements included how much time elapsed between a patient arriving at the hospital and having medications initiated (called door-to-needle, in hospital parlance) and the time from hospital arrival to angioplasty, a procedure to open a blocked blood vessel (called door-to-balloon).

"Significant reductions in treatment times across all measured parameters between pre- and post-intervention phases were noted," the researchers said in a news release from the American Heart Association. "Continuing statistically significant improvements were seen after completion of the official study period in door-to-needle as well as door-to-balloon and patient transfer times."

The study was to be presented Friday at American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

Every year, about 400,000 Americans experience a STEMI heart attack. STEMI, which affects a large area of the heart, carries a high risk of mortality and disability.

The study showed that better coordination can shorten the time to beginning coronary reperfusion -- techniques and treatments such as clot-dissolving drugs, angioplasty or surgery -- used to restore blood flow to the part of the heart muscle damaged during a heart attack. The finding "strongly favors the establishment of formal regional STEMI care networks," the researchers said.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on STEMI.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 24, 2009

Last Updated: April 24, 2009

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