ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
CANCER
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
The Unmedicated Mind
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment

FRIDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- Better coordination between paramedics, emergency room staff and laboratory personnel has led to steady improvements in the time needed to restore blood flow to people having a severe heart attack, new research shows.

The study involved patients who had what's known as an ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the deadliest type of heart attack. They were treated initially at a major North Carolina medical center or transferred there from other area hospitals.

Researchers compared data from four time periods spanning from before the new practices were put into place in 2005 through mid-2008.

Measurements included how much time elapsed between a patient arriving at the hospital and having medications initiated (called door-to-needle, in hospital parlance) and the time from hospital arrival to angioplasty, a procedure to open a blocked blood vessel (called door-to-balloon).

"Significant reductions in treatment times across all measured parameters between pre- and post-intervention phases were noted," the researchers said in a news release from the American Heart Association. "Continuing statistically significant improvements were seen after completion of the official study period in door-to-needle as well as door-to-balloon and patient transfer times."

The study was to be presented Friday at American Heart Association's 10th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in Washington, D.C.

Every year, about 400,000 Americans experience a STEMI heart attack. STEMI, which affects a large area of the heart, carries a high risk of mortality and disability.

The study showed that better coordination can shorten the time to beginning coronary reperfusion -- techniques and treatments such as clot-dissolving drugs, angioplasty or surgery -- used to restore blood flow to the part of the heart muscle damaged during a heart attack. The finding "strongly favors the establishment of formal regional STEMI care networks," the researchers said.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on STEMI.



-- Jennifer Thomas



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, April 24, 2009

Last Updated: April 24, 2009

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