ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Add your Article

Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Daily exercise provides cardiovascular benefits even during the preteen years, reveals a new German study.

It found that schoolchildren, who averaged 11 years old, lowered their blood pressure, improved their levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol and triglycerides and were less likely to be obese if they regularly participated in a supervised exercise program that included at least 15 minutes of endurance training. The research was conducted in the city of Leipzig.

"Even from these first-year results, we can say that regular physical activity has a significant beneficial effect on body composition, exercise capacity and cardiovascular risk markers in children," investigator Claudia Walther, of the Heart Centre of the University of Leipzig, said in a news release issued by European Society of Cardiology. The findings were presented last week at a conference in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the society.

For the study, the researchers randomly assigned 188 children to participate in the daily exercise program or follow the school's regular curriculum of two weekly sports lessons. A year later, the percentage of overweight and obese children in the daily exercise group had fallen from 13 percent to 9 percent while it had risen from 11 percent to 13 percent in the group that did only the standard sports programs.

Although the researchers had expected improvement among those in the daily exercise group, Walther said they were surprised by the "significant reduction in the overall prevalence of obesity or excess weight."

"It's so easy," she said. "All it needs is a little more time allocated to exercise lessons. The teachers are there, they supervise, and they all seem enthusiastic. If we can include daily exercise in the school curriculum, I'm sure we'll see an effect."

Kids who participated in the study will be followed for the next two decades to evaluate whether daily exercise during their youth affects their health in later years, Walther said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children and exercise.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, May 8, 2009

Last Updated: May 14, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com