ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
What you need to know about swine flu.
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Add your Article

Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Daily exercise provides cardiovascular benefits even during the preteen years, reveals a new German study.

It found that schoolchildren, who averaged 11 years old, lowered their blood pressure, improved their levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol and triglycerides and were less likely to be obese if they regularly participated in a supervised exercise program that included at least 15 minutes of endurance training. The research was conducted in the city of Leipzig.

"Even from these first-year results, we can say that regular physical activity has a significant beneficial effect on body composition, exercise capacity and cardiovascular risk markers in children," investigator Claudia Walther, of the Heart Centre of the University of Leipzig, said in a news release issued by European Society of Cardiology. The findings were presented last week at a conference in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the society.

For the study, the researchers randomly assigned 188 children to participate in the daily exercise program or follow the school's regular curriculum of two weekly sports lessons. A year later, the percentage of overweight and obese children in the daily exercise group had fallen from 13 percent to 9 percent while it had risen from 11 percent to 13 percent in the group that did only the standard sports programs.

Although the researchers had expected improvement among those in the daily exercise group, Walther said they were surprised by the "significant reduction in the overall prevalence of obesity or excess weight."

"It's so easy," she said. "All it needs is a little more time allocated to exercise lessons. The teachers are there, they supervise, and they all seem enthusiastic. If we can include daily exercise in the school curriculum, I'm sure we'll see an effect."

Kids who participated in the study will be followed for the next two decades to evaluate whether daily exercise during their youth affects their health in later years, Walther said.

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about children and exercise.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, May 8, 2009

Last Updated: May 14, 2009

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