ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
CANCER
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
CAREGIVING
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Add your Article

DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- A diet that prevents and lowers high blood pressure has been linked to a reduced risk of heart failure in women, a new study finds.

"The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] diet may contribute to prevention of heart failure in some cases because it effectively reduced blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol levels in clinical trials," wrote Emily B. Levitan, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues.

"This diet features high intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and whole grains, resulting in high potassium, magnesium, calcium and fiber consumption, moderately high protein consumption, and low total fat and saturated fat consumption," the authors added.

The researchers analyzed data from 36,019 Swedish women, aged 48 to 83, who did not have heart failure in 1997-1998 when they completed a questionnaire about their eating habits. During seven years of follow-up, 443 of the women developed heart failure, including 415 who were hospitalized and 28 who died of the condition, according to the report published in the May 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The 25 percent of women with the highest DASH diet scores had a 37 percent lower rate of heart failure than the 25 percent of women with the lowest DASH diet scores, the researchers found. Women within the top 10 percent of DASH diet scores had half the rate of heart failure of those with the lowest DASH diet scores.

Previous research has shown that the DASH diet cuts systolic (top number) blood pressure by about 5.5 mm Hg, a decrease that could lower the rate of heart failure an estimated 12 percent, Levitan noted in a news release from the journal. Lower levels of LDL cholesterol, the estrogen-like effects of some of the nutrients in the diet, and a decrease in oxygen-related cell damage may also contribute to reduced heart failure risk in those who eat the DASH diet.

More information

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation has more about women and heart failure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 11, 2009

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