ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
CANCER
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Imagine Food Aromas That Prevent Overeating
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
EYE CARE, VISION
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
FITNESS
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Add your Article

DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- A diet that prevents and lowers high blood pressure has been linked to a reduced risk of heart failure in women, a new study finds.

"The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] diet may contribute to prevention of heart failure in some cases because it effectively reduced blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol levels in clinical trials," wrote Emily B. Levitan, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues.

"This diet features high intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and whole grains, resulting in high potassium, magnesium, calcium and fiber consumption, moderately high protein consumption, and low total fat and saturated fat consumption," the authors added.

The researchers analyzed data from 36,019 Swedish women, aged 48 to 83, who did not have heart failure in 1997-1998 when they completed a questionnaire about their eating habits. During seven years of follow-up, 443 of the women developed heart failure, including 415 who were hospitalized and 28 who died of the condition, according to the report published in the May 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The 25 percent of women with the highest DASH diet scores had a 37 percent lower rate of heart failure than the 25 percent of women with the lowest DASH diet scores, the researchers found. Women within the top 10 percent of DASH diet scores had half the rate of heart failure of those with the lowest DASH diet scores.

Previous research has shown that the DASH diet cuts systolic (top number) blood pressure by about 5.5 mm Hg, a decrease that could lower the rate of heart failure an estimated 12 percent, Levitan noted in a news release from the journal. Lower levels of LDL cholesterol, the estrogen-like effects of some of the nutrients in the diet, and a decrease in oxygen-related cell damage may also contribute to reduced heart failure risk in those who eat the DASH diet.

More information

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation has more about women and heart failure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 11, 2009

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