ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
CANCER
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- A diet that prevents and lowers high blood pressure has been linked to a reduced risk of heart failure in women, a new study finds.

"The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] diet may contribute to prevention of heart failure in some cases because it effectively reduced blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol levels in clinical trials," wrote Emily B. Levitan, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues.

"This diet features high intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and whole grains, resulting in high potassium, magnesium, calcium and fiber consumption, moderately high protein consumption, and low total fat and saturated fat consumption," the authors added.

The researchers analyzed data from 36,019 Swedish women, aged 48 to 83, who did not have heart failure in 1997-1998 when they completed a questionnaire about their eating habits. During seven years of follow-up, 443 of the women developed heart failure, including 415 who were hospitalized and 28 who died of the condition, according to the report published in the May 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The 25 percent of women with the highest DASH diet scores had a 37 percent lower rate of heart failure than the 25 percent of women with the lowest DASH diet scores, the researchers found. Women within the top 10 percent of DASH diet scores had half the rate of heart failure of those with the lowest DASH diet scores.

Previous research has shown that the DASH diet cuts systolic (top number) blood pressure by about 5.5 mm Hg, a decrease that could lower the rate of heart failure an estimated 12 percent, Levitan noted in a news release from the journal. Lower levels of LDL cholesterol, the estrogen-like effects of some of the nutrients in the diet, and a decrease in oxygen-related cell damage may also contribute to reduced heart failure risk in those who eat the DASH diet.

More information

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation has more about women and heart failure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 11, 2009

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