ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Add your Article

DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- A diet that prevents and lowers high blood pressure has been linked to a reduced risk of heart failure in women, a new study finds.

"The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] diet may contribute to prevention of heart failure in some cases because it effectively reduced blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol levels in clinical trials," wrote Emily B. Levitan, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues.

"This diet features high intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and whole grains, resulting in high potassium, magnesium, calcium and fiber consumption, moderately high protein consumption, and low total fat and saturated fat consumption," the authors added.

The researchers analyzed data from 36,019 Swedish women, aged 48 to 83, who did not have heart failure in 1997-1998 when they completed a questionnaire about their eating habits. During seven years of follow-up, 443 of the women developed heart failure, including 415 who were hospitalized and 28 who died of the condition, according to the report published in the May 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The 25 percent of women with the highest DASH diet scores had a 37 percent lower rate of heart failure than the 25 percent of women with the lowest DASH diet scores, the researchers found. Women within the top 10 percent of DASH diet scores had half the rate of heart failure of those with the lowest DASH diet scores.

Previous research has shown that the DASH diet cuts systolic (top number) blood pressure by about 5.5 mm Hg, a decrease that could lower the rate of heart failure an estimated 12 percent, Levitan noted in a news release from the journal. Lower levels of LDL cholesterol, the estrogen-like effects of some of the nutrients in the diet, and a decrease in oxygen-related cell damage may also contribute to reduced heart failure risk in those who eat the DASH diet.

More information

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation has more about women and heart failure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 11, 2009

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