ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Winter Is Tough on Feet
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
The Unmedicated Mind
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Add your Article

DASH Diet Has Extra Benefits for Women's Health

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- A diet that prevents and lowers high blood pressure has been linked to a reduced risk of heart failure in women, a new study finds.

"The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] diet may contribute to prevention of heart failure in some cases because it effectively reduced blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol levels in clinical trials," wrote Emily B. Levitan, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues.

"This diet features high intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and whole grains, resulting in high potassium, magnesium, calcium and fiber consumption, moderately high protein consumption, and low total fat and saturated fat consumption," the authors added.

The researchers analyzed data from 36,019 Swedish women, aged 48 to 83, who did not have heart failure in 1997-1998 when they completed a questionnaire about their eating habits. During seven years of follow-up, 443 of the women developed heart failure, including 415 who were hospitalized and 28 who died of the condition, according to the report published in the May 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The 25 percent of women with the highest DASH diet scores had a 37 percent lower rate of heart failure than the 25 percent of women with the lowest DASH diet scores, the researchers found. Women within the top 10 percent of DASH diet scores had half the rate of heart failure of those with the lowest DASH diet scores.

Previous research has shown that the DASH diet cuts systolic (top number) blood pressure by about 5.5 mm Hg, a decrease that could lower the rate of heart failure an estimated 12 percent, Levitan noted in a news release from the journal. Lower levels of LDL cholesterol, the estrogen-like effects of some of the nutrients in the diet, and a decrease in oxygen-related cell damage may also contribute to reduced heart failure risk in those who eat the DASH diet.

More information

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation has more about women and heart failure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 11, 2009

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