ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
CANCER
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All

Most people will welcome the start of daylight savings time this Sunday because it starts to stay light longer, even if that means the early mornings will be dark once again.

However, that shift may not be such a welcome change for people with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a seasonal depression that occurs in the fall and winter and is caused, at least in part, by the lack of daylight during these seasons. Some experts suspect that light in the morning may be especially important for helping people with SAD, as well as for jumpstarting circadian rhythms in all people.

"In general, in terms of normal sleep patterns, daylight in the morning is better than light later in the day. Remember, our circadian rhythms were set eons ago to a rhythm that didn't include daylight savings time, so the shift tends to throw people off a bit," said Dr. Nicholas Rummo, director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mt. Kisco, N.Y.

"Daylight savings time is anti-physiologic, and it's a little deleterious, at least for several days," he said, adding that research has shown that the rate of auto accidents goes up slightly in the days following the change to daylight savings time.

For people with SAD, he noted, the shift in daylight may be even more difficult. "Normally, people with SAD start to feel better around this time of the year, and light earlier in the day is more helpful for them," said Rummo.

Seasonal affective disorder is a type of depression that appears during the colder months of the year, and symptoms tend to be at their worst in January and February, according to the American Psychiatric Association. Symptoms of SAD include fatigue, a lack of interest in usual activities, social withdrawal, weight gain and a craving for foods high in carbohydrates, according to the association.

"The hallmark of seasonal affective disorder is a pattern of depression that occurs in the fall and winter months that improves in the spring. There's a definite seasonal pattern," explained Dr. Emil Coccaro, the E.C. Manning professor and chairman of the department of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago. "They have a major depression in the fall and winter when there's less light and they recover when there's more and more light."

The main treatment for SAD is exposure to bright lights, he said. And, during the fall and winter, people with SAD do this using light boxes that flood extra light into an area.

Previous research, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, has suggested that bright light treatment is most effective when done in the morning for people with SAD.

Rummo said that people on the Western edges of a time zone, and those living in Northern areas, may be affected a little bit more because they already experience more darkness in the morning.

"This is something that people should be a little bit aware of," said Rummo. But, he noted, it's also important to remember that it is just an hour, and everyone, including people with SAD, will eventually adjust to the switch.

And, Coccaro added that for people with SAD, the amount of light you're exposed to during the day is likely more important than the timing of that light exposure.

SOURCES: Nicholas Rummo, M.D., sleep specialist and director, Center for Sleep Medicine, Northern Westchester Hospital, Mt. Kisco, N.Y.; Emil Coccaro, M.D., E.C. Manning Professor, and chairman, department of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience, University of Chicago