ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Countdown to Hair Loss
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
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Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All

Most people will welcome the start of daylight savings time this Sunday because it starts to stay light longer, even if that means the early mornings will be dark once again.

However, that shift may not be such a welcome change for people with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a seasonal depression that occurs in the fall and winter and is caused, at least in part, by the lack of daylight during these seasons. Some experts suspect that light in the morning may be especially important for helping people with SAD, as well as for jumpstarting circadian rhythms in all people.

"In general, in terms of normal sleep patterns, daylight in the morning is better than light later in the day. Remember, our circadian rhythms were set eons ago to a rhythm that didn't include daylight savings time, so the shift tends to throw people off a bit," said Dr. Nicholas Rummo, director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mt. Kisco, N.Y.

"Daylight savings time is anti-physiologic, and it's a little deleterious, at least for several days," he said, adding that research has shown that the rate of auto accidents goes up slightly in the days following the change to daylight savings time.

For people with SAD, he noted, the shift in daylight may be even more difficult. "Normally, people with SAD start to feel better around this time of the year, and light earlier in the day is more helpful for them," said Rummo.

Seasonal affective disorder is a type of depression that appears during the colder months of the year, and symptoms tend to be at their worst in January and February, according to the American Psychiatric Association. Symptoms of SAD include fatigue, a lack of interest in usual activities, social withdrawal, weight gain and a craving for foods high in carbohydrates, according to the association.

"The hallmark of seasonal affective disorder is a pattern of depression that occurs in the fall and winter months that improves in the spring. There's a definite seasonal pattern," explained Dr. Emil Coccaro, the E.C. Manning professor and chairman of the department of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago. "They have a major depression in the fall and winter when there's less light and they recover when there's more and more light."

The main treatment for SAD is exposure to bright lights, he said. And, during the fall and winter, people with SAD do this using light boxes that flood extra light into an area.

Previous research, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, has suggested that bright light treatment is most effective when done in the morning for people with SAD.

Rummo said that people on the Western edges of a time zone, and those living in Northern areas, may be affected a little bit more because they already experience more darkness in the morning.

"This is something that people should be a little bit aware of," said Rummo. But, he noted, it's also important to remember that it is just an hour, and everyone, including people with SAD, will eventually adjust to the switch.

And, Coccaro added that for people with SAD, the amount of light you're exposed to during the day is likely more important than the timing of that light exposure.

SOURCES: Nicholas Rummo, M.D., sleep specialist and director, Center for Sleep Medicine, Northern Westchester Hospital, Mt. Kisco, N.Y.; Emil Coccaro, M.D., E.C. Manning Professor, and chairman, department of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience, University of Chicago