ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
CAREGIVING
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
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Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall

WEDNESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The number of underweight children aged 2 to 19 in the United States decreased from 5.1 percent in 1971-1974 to 3.3 percent in 2003-2006, says a U.S. government study.

Being underweight can be caused by malnutrition or underlying health problems.

Researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics analyzed results from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and compared them with results from the 1970s. They found that underweight decreased from 5.8 percent to 2.8 percent among children aged 2 to 5, from 5.3 percent to 2.7 percent among children aged 6 to 11, and from 4.7 percent to 3.8 percent among those aged 12 to 19.

Surveys before 1971 didn't include children aged 2 to 5, the authors of the report noted.

The NHANES participants underwent a household interview and a physical examination that included weight and height measurements taken by trained health technicians using standardized measuring procedures and equipment.

Children with body-mass index (BMI) values below the 5th percentile of the sex-specific BMI-for-age growth charts are classified as underweight.

SOURCES: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, July 15, 2009