ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Exposure to 9/11 Fumes Tied to Chronic Headaches
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
FITNESS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
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Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of dementia in developing countries have been greatly underestimated, according to researchers who used a specially-developed method of calculating dementia prevalence.

Previous studies have suggested that rates of dementia in developing countries are much lower than in high-income countries. However, the quality and evidence base of these studies are poor, according to the authors of the new study, who are members of the 10/66 Research Group.

The group is named to reflect the global research community's neglect of dementia patients in developing countries. Just 10 percent of research is focused on the 66 percent of dementia patients living in low- and middle-income countries.

The standard DSM-IV criteria for dementia diagnosis are too restrictive, requiring memory impairment (which is not an early feature in some dementia subtypes), and clear evidence of social and occupational impairment (which can be difficult to establish in low- and middle-income countries), according to background information in the study.

The 10/66 group developed its own method of dementia diagnosis, based on an assessment at the person's home, including a clinical interview, cognitive tests, and interviews with family and friends. This approach may reveal more mild and moderate cases of dementia, according to the group.

Using DSM-IV criteria, rates of dementia in developing countries varied widely, from 0.3 percent in rural India to 6.3 percent in Cuba. The prevalence of dementia in urban Latin America sites was 80 percent of that in Europe, in China the prevalence was half of that in Europe, and in India and rural Latin American the prevalence was a quarter or less of that in Europe.

The 10/66 method revealed a higher prevalence of dementia in developing countries and was more consistent across sites, varying between 5.6 percent in rural China and 11.7 percent in the Dominican Republic.

While 847 of the 1,345 cases of dementia identified by the 10/66 method weren't confirmed as DSM-IV dementia, the validity of those 847 cases was supported by high levels of associated disability, the study authors said.

"We believe that our methods have drawn attention to a substantial prevalence of dementia that might have been missed. Prevalence differences between developed and developing countries might not be as large as previously thought," the study authors wrote.

The study was released online by The Lancet to coincide with a presentation at the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Chicago.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians outlines common signs of dementia.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, July 27, 2008

Last Updated: July 28, 2008

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