ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
The Raw Food Diet
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
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Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of dementia in developing countries have been greatly underestimated, according to researchers who used a specially-developed method of calculating dementia prevalence.

Previous studies have suggested that rates of dementia in developing countries are much lower than in high-income countries. However, the quality and evidence base of these studies are poor, according to the authors of the new study, who are members of the 10/66 Research Group.

The group is named to reflect the global research community's neglect of dementia patients in developing countries. Just 10 percent of research is focused on the 66 percent of dementia patients living in low- and middle-income countries.

The standard DSM-IV criteria for dementia diagnosis are too restrictive, requiring memory impairment (which is not an early feature in some dementia subtypes), and clear evidence of social and occupational impairment (which can be difficult to establish in low- and middle-income countries), according to background information in the study.

The 10/66 group developed its own method of dementia diagnosis, based on an assessment at the person's home, including a clinical interview, cognitive tests, and interviews with family and friends. This approach may reveal more mild and moderate cases of dementia, according to the group.

Using DSM-IV criteria, rates of dementia in developing countries varied widely, from 0.3 percent in rural India to 6.3 percent in Cuba. The prevalence of dementia in urban Latin America sites was 80 percent of that in Europe, in China the prevalence was half of that in Europe, and in India and rural Latin American the prevalence was a quarter or less of that in Europe.

The 10/66 method revealed a higher prevalence of dementia in developing countries and was more consistent across sites, varying between 5.6 percent in rural China and 11.7 percent in the Dominican Republic.

While 847 of the 1,345 cases of dementia identified by the 10/66 method weren't confirmed as DSM-IV dementia, the validity of those 847 cases was supported by high levels of associated disability, the study authors said.

"We believe that our methods have drawn attention to a substantial prevalence of dementia that might have been missed. Prevalence differences between developed and developing countries might not be as large as previously thought," the study authors wrote.

The study was released online by The Lancet to coincide with a presentation at the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Chicago.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians outlines common signs of dementia.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, July 27, 2008

Last Updated: July 28, 2008

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