ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
CAREGIVING
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
FITNESS
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
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Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals

THURSDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Dental implants require much more follow-up treatment than root canals, according to a study by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

The findings suggest that every effort should be made to preserve natural teeth before considering implants.

The researchers examined the charts of a group of patients who received a total of 129 dental implants and a group of patients who received 143 root canals. The follow-up ranged from 15 to 57 months (average of 36 months) for the dental implants and 18 to 59 months (average of 22 months) for the root canals.

The success rate for the dental implants was 98.4 percent; for root canals it was 99.3 percent. However, 12.4 percent of the dental implants required additional interventions, compared with 1.4 percent of the root canals.

The findings were published in the November issue of the Journal of Endodontics.

"Many dental professionals today are faced with the dilemma of whether root canal treatment or dental implants are the best option for their patients," lead investigator Dr. James Porter Hannahan, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said in an American Association of Endodontists (AAE) news release. "While the success of both procedures is similar, saving the natural tooth through a root canal rarely requires follow-up treatment and generally lasts a lifetime; implants, on the other hand, have more post-operative complications and higher long-term failure rates."

Research has shown that poor oral health and tooth loss may be associated with serious health problems such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and even certain types of cancer.

"Considering these (study) results in light of the growing body of evidence on the impact of oral health on overall health, it is imperative for dental professionals to partner with endodontists who have advanced training in examining whether a natural tooth can be saved through root canal treatment," AAE President Dr. Louis Rossman said in the news release. "While implants may be an appropriate solution for people with missing teeth, endodontic treatment should be the first choice for restoring a compromised tooth."

In root canal, the inflamed pulp that's causing pain is removed, and the inside of the tooth is cleaned, filled and sealed. Most root canals can be completed in one visit. Each year in the United States, root canals restore and save about 17 million teeth. In dental implants, the tooth is extracted, a metal post is inserted in the jaw, and a porcelain crown is attached to the post. An implant can require three or more visits over the course of several months, according to the AAE.

More information

The American Dental Association has more about root canal.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Association of Endodontists, news relase, Nov. 13, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 20, 2008

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