ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
EYE CARE, VISION
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Retail Clinics Attracting Those Without Regular Doctors
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
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Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adolescents have experienced at least one bout of major depression in the past year, but only about 39 percent of those cases received treatment, a new government report released Wednesday shows.

Conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the report found that health insurance coverage was a major deciding factor in whether or not treatment occurred. For example, 42.9 percent of adolescents suffering from depression who were covered by Medicaid/CHIP received treatment, as did 40.6 percent of those covered by health insurance. But only 17.2 percent of adolescents without insurance coverage received the depression treatment they needed, the SAMHSA report found.

Among those children who did receive treatment for depression, about 59 percent saw or spoke with a counselor, just under 37 percent interacted with a psychologist, 27.3 percent saw or spoke with either a psychiatrist or psychotherapist, 26.6 percent used a general practitioner or family doctor, and 46.8 percent received a prescription medication to treat their depression.

A major depressive episode was defined as a period of two weeks or more in which the person experienced depressed mood or loss of interest, plus at least four other symptoms such as change in functioning, trouble sleeping or eating and/or problems with concentration or self-image.

The report draws on data from SAMHSA's 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which included information on a representative sampling of about 22,000 12- to 17-year-olds throughout the United States.

More information

There's more on spotting and preventing depression among young people at the National Institutes of Health.



-- E.J. Mundell



SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, news release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 13, 2009

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