ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
CANCER
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
CAREGIVING
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Eat Light - Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
EYE CARE, VISION
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Football Can Shrink Players
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Multivitamins Might Prolong Life
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
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Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adolescents have experienced at least one bout of major depression in the past year, but only about 39 percent of those cases received treatment, a new government report released Wednesday shows.

Conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the report found that health insurance coverage was a major deciding factor in whether or not treatment occurred. For example, 42.9 percent of adolescents suffering from depression who were covered by Medicaid/CHIP received treatment, as did 40.6 percent of those covered by health insurance. But only 17.2 percent of adolescents without insurance coverage received the depression treatment they needed, the SAMHSA report found.

Among those children who did receive treatment for depression, about 59 percent saw or spoke with a counselor, just under 37 percent interacted with a psychologist, 27.3 percent saw or spoke with either a psychiatrist or psychotherapist, 26.6 percent used a general practitioner or family doctor, and 46.8 percent received a prescription medication to treat their depression.

A major depressive episode was defined as a period of two weeks or more in which the person experienced depressed mood or loss of interest, plus at least four other symptoms such as change in functioning, trouble sleeping or eating and/or problems with concentration or self-image.

The report draws on data from SAMHSA's 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which included information on a representative sampling of about 22,000 12- to 17-year-olds throughout the United States.

More information

There's more on spotting and preventing depression among young people at the National Institutes of Health.



-- E.J. Mundell



SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, news release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 13, 2009

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