ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
CANCER
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
FITNESS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Countdown to Hair Loss
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adolescents have experienced at least one bout of major depression in the past year, but only about 39 percent of those cases received treatment, a new government report released Wednesday shows.

Conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the report found that health insurance coverage was a major deciding factor in whether or not treatment occurred. For example, 42.9 percent of adolescents suffering from depression who were covered by Medicaid/CHIP received treatment, as did 40.6 percent of those covered by health insurance. But only 17.2 percent of adolescents without insurance coverage received the depression treatment they needed, the SAMHSA report found.

Among those children who did receive treatment for depression, about 59 percent saw or spoke with a counselor, just under 37 percent interacted with a psychologist, 27.3 percent saw or spoke with either a psychiatrist or psychotherapist, 26.6 percent used a general practitioner or family doctor, and 46.8 percent received a prescription medication to treat their depression.

A major depressive episode was defined as a period of two weeks or more in which the person experienced depressed mood or loss of interest, plus at least four other symptoms such as change in functioning, trouble sleeping or eating and/or problems with concentration or self-image.

The report draws on data from SAMHSA's 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which included information on a representative sampling of about 22,000 12- to 17-year-olds throughout the United States.

More information

There's more on spotting and preventing depression among young people at the National Institutes of Health.



-- E.J. Mundell



SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, news release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 13, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com