ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Psychiatric Drugs Might Raise Cardiac Death Risk
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
The Unmedicated Mind
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
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Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adolescents have experienced at least one bout of major depression in the past year, but only about 39 percent of those cases received treatment, a new government report released Wednesday shows.

Conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the report found that health insurance coverage was a major deciding factor in whether or not treatment occurred. For example, 42.9 percent of adolescents suffering from depression who were covered by Medicaid/CHIP received treatment, as did 40.6 percent of those covered by health insurance. But only 17.2 percent of adolescents without insurance coverage received the depression treatment they needed, the SAMHSA report found.

Among those children who did receive treatment for depression, about 59 percent saw or spoke with a counselor, just under 37 percent interacted with a psychologist, 27.3 percent saw or spoke with either a psychiatrist or psychotherapist, 26.6 percent used a general practitioner or family doctor, and 46.8 percent received a prescription medication to treat their depression.

A major depressive episode was defined as a period of two weeks or more in which the person experienced depressed mood or loss of interest, plus at least four other symptoms such as change in functioning, trouble sleeping or eating and/or problems with concentration or self-image.

The report draws on data from SAMHSA's 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which included information on a representative sampling of about 22,000 12- to 17-year-olds throughout the United States.

More information

There's more on spotting and preventing depression among young people at the National Institutes of Health.



-- E.J. Mundell



SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, news release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 13, 2009

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