ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinkers Might Live Longer
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
EYE CARE, VISION
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Football Can Shrink Players
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Workplace Wellness Seems to Really Work
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
New Options Offered for Sleep Apnea
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adolescents have experienced at least one bout of major depression in the past year, but only about 39 percent of those cases received treatment, a new government report released Wednesday shows.

Conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the report found that health insurance coverage was a major deciding factor in whether or not treatment occurred. For example, 42.9 percent of adolescents suffering from depression who were covered by Medicaid/CHIP received treatment, as did 40.6 percent of those covered by health insurance. But only 17.2 percent of adolescents without insurance coverage received the depression treatment they needed, the SAMHSA report found.

Among those children who did receive treatment for depression, about 59 percent saw or spoke with a counselor, just under 37 percent interacted with a psychologist, 27.3 percent saw or spoke with either a psychiatrist or psychotherapist, 26.6 percent used a general practitioner or family doctor, and 46.8 percent received a prescription medication to treat their depression.

A major depressive episode was defined as a period of two weeks or more in which the person experienced depressed mood or loss of interest, plus at least four other symptoms such as change in functioning, trouble sleeping or eating and/or problems with concentration or self-image.

The report draws on data from SAMHSA's 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which included information on a representative sampling of about 22,000 12- to 17-year-olds throughout the United States.

More information

There's more on spotting and preventing depression among young people at the National Institutes of Health.



-- E.J. Mundell



SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, news release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 13, 2009

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