ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
CAREGIVING
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
New Guidelines for Treating Heart Failure
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
DIET, NUTRITION
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Barefoot Best for Running?
Be Healthy, Spend Less
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
8 Drugs Doctors Would Never Take
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Laugh and the World Understands
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Add your Article

Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 American adolescents have experienced at least one bout of major depression in the past year, but only about 39 percent of those cases received treatment, a new government report released Wednesday shows.

Conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the report found that health insurance coverage was a major deciding factor in whether or not treatment occurred. For example, 42.9 percent of adolescents suffering from depression who were covered by Medicaid/CHIP received treatment, as did 40.6 percent of those covered by health insurance. But only 17.2 percent of adolescents without insurance coverage received the depression treatment they needed, the SAMHSA report found.

Among those children who did receive treatment for depression, about 59 percent saw or spoke with a counselor, just under 37 percent interacted with a psychologist, 27.3 percent saw or spoke with either a psychiatrist or psychotherapist, 26.6 percent used a general practitioner or family doctor, and 46.8 percent received a prescription medication to treat their depression.

A major depressive episode was defined as a period of two weeks or more in which the person experienced depressed mood or loss of interest, plus at least four other symptoms such as change in functioning, trouble sleeping or eating and/or problems with concentration or self-image.

The report draws on data from SAMHSA's 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which included information on a representative sampling of about 22,000 12- to 17-year-olds throughout the United States.

More information

There's more on spotting and preventing depression among young people at the National Institutes of Health.



-- E.J. Mundell



SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, news release, May 13, 2009

Last Updated: May 13, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com