ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
FITNESS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Add your Article

Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk

TUESDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- A class of diabetes drugs called glitazones are associated with an increased risk of a vision-threatening complication called diabetic macular edema (DME), which features swelling and fluid accumulation in the retina.

Glitazones are a newer class of diabetes drugs that includes medicines such as pioglitazone (Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia).

The U.S. study of 996 DME patients found that those who took glitazones were 2.6 times more likely to develop DME than those who didn't take the drugs. Even after adjusting for other factors, the risk of DME remained 60 percent higher for patients who took glitazones, said the researchers at the Southern California Permanente Medical Group.

The study, published in the April issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, isn't the first to suggest a link between glitazones and DME. But it does confirm that the drugs are "modestly associated" with increased risk of DME, which is a common complication of diabetes.

"When treating patients with DME, ophthalmologists should consider the role of the glitazone class of drugs," the study authors concluded.

"Ocular (eye) complications are an overlooked safety issue of systemic drugs," noted Dr. Thomas J. Liesegang, editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

"Safety is as important as the efficacy of a drug. However, long-term safety is not currently monitored, because the approval process is based on smaller, shorter-term clinical trials. Safety necessarily requires monitoring of treatment in larger groups of people over longer periods of time. This monitoring is often neglected and should be required of all therapies," Liesegang said.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more about diabetes-related eye complications.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Elsevier, news release, April 2, 2009

Last Updated: April 07, 2009

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