ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Compound in Red Wine Fights Ravages of Age
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Help Your Kids Stay Active
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Add your Article

Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring

TUESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans with diabetic retinopathy is expected to increase from 5.5 million to 16 million by the year 2050, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study.

Diabetic retinopathy, which is damage to the small blood vessels in the retina, is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in the United States. In 2004, about $500 million was spent on direct medical costs for diabetic retinopathy, according to background information in the study.

"People with diabetes mellitus also have a higher prevalence of other eye diseases, such as cataracts and glaucoma, than the general population," the researchers wrote. "Vision loss related to eye disease among people with diabetes is an important disability that threatens independence and can lead to depression, reduced mobility and reduced quality of life."

For their study, Dr. Jinan B Saaddine and colleagues analyzed data from the 2004 National Health Interview Survey and the U.S. Census Bureau to predict the number of Americans with diabetes who will have diabetic retinopathy, vision threatening diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and cataracts in 2050, when the country's population is expected to be 402 million.

Along with the increase in diabetic retinopathy cases from 5.5 million to 16 million, the researchers also projected that:

* The number of cases of vision threatening diabetic retinopathy will increase from 1.2 million to 3.4 million.
* Among Americans 65 and older, the number of cases of diabetic retinopathy will rise from 2.5 million to 9.9 million, and the number of cases of vision threatening diabetic retinopathy will increase from 500,000 to 1.9 million.
* Cataract cases among whites and blacks age 40 or older with diabetes will increase 235 percent.
* Cataract cases among people age 75 and older with diabetes will increase 637 percent for black women and 677 percent for black men.
* Glaucoma cases among Hispanics age 65 and older with diabetes will increase 12-fold.

"In summary, our projections have shown higher numbers than previously estimated for diabetic retinopathy, vision threatening diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, and glaucoma among Americans with diabetes. Efforts to prevent diabetes and to optimally manage diabetes and its complications are needed," the researchers concluded.

The study was published in the December issue of the journal Archives of Ophthalmology.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more about diabetes-related eye complications.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 09, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com