ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Get to Know the Pap Test
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Weekend Admission May Be Riskier for GI Bleeding
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Antioxidants Abound in Cereals, Popcorn, Whole-Grain Snacks
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring

TUESDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans with diabetic retinopathy is expected to increase from 5.5 million to 16 million by the year 2050, according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study.

Diabetic retinopathy, which is damage to the small blood vessels in the retina, is the leading cause of blindness among working-age adults in the United States. In 2004, about $500 million was spent on direct medical costs for diabetic retinopathy, according to background information in the study.

"People with diabetes mellitus also have a higher prevalence of other eye diseases, such as cataracts and glaucoma, than the general population," the researchers wrote. "Vision loss related to eye disease among people with diabetes is an important disability that threatens independence and can lead to depression, reduced mobility and reduced quality of life."

For their study, Dr. Jinan B Saaddine and colleagues analyzed data from the 2004 National Health Interview Survey and the U.S. Census Bureau to predict the number of Americans with diabetes who will have diabetic retinopathy, vision threatening diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and cataracts in 2050, when the country's population is expected to be 402 million.

Along with the increase in diabetic retinopathy cases from 5.5 million to 16 million, the researchers also projected that:

* The number of cases of vision threatening diabetic retinopathy will increase from 1.2 million to 3.4 million.
* Among Americans 65 and older, the number of cases of diabetic retinopathy will rise from 2.5 million to 9.9 million, and the number of cases of vision threatening diabetic retinopathy will increase from 500,000 to 1.9 million.
* Cataract cases among whites and blacks age 40 or older with diabetes will increase 235 percent.
* Cataract cases among people age 75 and older with diabetes will increase 637 percent for black women and 677 percent for black men.
* Glaucoma cases among Hispanics age 65 and older with diabetes will increase 12-fold.

"In summary, our projections have shown higher numbers than previously estimated for diabetic retinopathy, vision threatening diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, and glaucoma among Americans with diabetes. Efforts to prevent diabetes and to optimally manage diabetes and its complications are needed," the researchers concluded.

The study was published in the December issue of the journal Archives of Ophthalmology.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more about diabetes-related eye complications.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, Dec. 8, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 09, 2008

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