ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
CANCER
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
1976 Italian Dioxin Release Damaged Babies' Thyroids
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
A Honey of a Sinusitis Treatment
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment

THURSDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Improper use of chemical disinfectants might actually make the bacteria they are trying to kill stronger and more resistant over time, a new report says.

When these chemicals, called biocides, are used at lower-than-lethal concentrations, the bacteria can survive and eventually become resistant to the chemical and antibiotics, according to a paper published in the October issue of Microbiology.

In experiments done on the potentially lethal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, researchers found the samples mutated when exposed to low concentrations of several biocides and dyes regular used in hospitals for disinfecting. The mutated bacterium had increased numbers of efflux pumps, which remove toxins from its cells. The pumps eliminate antibiotics from the cell and can make the bacteria resistant to those drugs.

"Pathogenic bacteria with more pumps are a threat to patients, as they could be more resistant to treatment," author Dr. Glenn Kaatz, head of infectious diseases for the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Detroit, said in a society news release.

If the surviving bacteria are exposed repeatedly to biocides, they may build up resistance to disinfectants and antibiotics. Such bacteria contribute to hospital-acquired infections.

"Careful use of antibiotics and the use of biocides that are not known to be recognized by efflux pumps may reduce the frequency at which resistant strains are found," Kaatz said. "Alternatively, the combination of a pump inhibitor with an antimicrobial agent or biocide will reduce the emergence of such strains and their clinical impact."

More information

The Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics has more about antibacterial agents.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Society for General Microbiology, news release, Oct. 5, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2008

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