ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Indigo Ointment Benefits Psoriasis Patients
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
Functional Foods Uncovered
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Treat symptoms (result of disease) or diagnose systems (cause of disease)?
Dr Churchill & Ashley Pelton Interview 1 of 4
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Safety Should Be Priority for Those Involved in Kids' Sports
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
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Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas

TUESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- People with kidney failure who live in rural or remote areas are not less likely to get a kidney transplant than people in urban areas, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed U.S. data on 699,751 adults with kidney failure who were placed on a kidney transplant list between 1995 and 2007. After about two years on the list, 122,785 (17.5 percent) of them had received a transplant. Median distance to the closest transplant center was 15 miles.

In contrast to their pre-study theory that people who lived farthest from a transplant center were less likely to get a transplant, "the likelihood of receiving a kidney transplant from a deceased or living donor among patients living farther away was similar to or greater than those residing within 15 miles of kidney transplant centers," the study authors wrote. "Similarly, and again in contrast to our hypotheses, the adjusted likelihood of kidney transplant was slightly lower among rural dwellers."

The study is in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"Although unexpected, our findings are encouraging because determining eligibility for kidney transplantation is a logistically challenging process that requires sequential diagnostic tests and encounters with health-care clinicians," wrote Dr. Marcello Tonelli, of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues. "The finding that time to transplantation is similar or even shorter among remote- and rural-dwelling patients with kidney failure suggests that disparities in access for remote- and rural-dwellers with other diseases could be reduced or eliminated."

"These data suggest that efforts to improve equitable access to transplantation should not focus on populations defined solely by residence location," the researchers concluded.

More information

The National Kidney Foundation has more about kidney transplantation.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, April 21, 2009

Last Updated: April 21, 2009

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