ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Maximize Your Run
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
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Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas

TUESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- People with kidney failure who live in rural or remote areas are not less likely to get a kidney transplant than people in urban areas, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed U.S. data on 699,751 adults with kidney failure who were placed on a kidney transplant list between 1995 and 2007. After about two years on the list, 122,785 (17.5 percent) of them had received a transplant. Median distance to the closest transplant center was 15 miles.

In contrast to their pre-study theory that people who lived farthest from a transplant center were less likely to get a transplant, "the likelihood of receiving a kidney transplant from a deceased or living donor among patients living farther away was similar to or greater than those residing within 15 miles of kidney transplant centers," the study authors wrote. "Similarly, and again in contrast to our hypotheses, the adjusted likelihood of kidney transplant was slightly lower among rural dwellers."

The study is in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"Although unexpected, our findings are encouraging because determining eligibility for kidney transplantation is a logistically challenging process that requires sequential diagnostic tests and encounters with health-care clinicians," wrote Dr. Marcello Tonelli, of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues. "The finding that time to transplantation is similar or even shorter among remote- and rural-dwelling patients with kidney failure suggests that disparities in access for remote- and rural-dwellers with other diseases could be reduced or eliminated."

"These data suggest that efforts to improve equitable access to transplantation should not focus on populations defined solely by residence location," the researchers concluded.

More information

The National Kidney Foundation has more about kidney transplantation.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, April 21, 2009

Last Updated: April 21, 2009

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