ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
CANCER
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
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Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas

TUESDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- People with kidney failure who live in rural or remote areas are not less likely to get a kidney transplant than people in urban areas, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed U.S. data on 699,751 adults with kidney failure who were placed on a kidney transplant list between 1995 and 2007. After about two years on the list, 122,785 (17.5 percent) of them had received a transplant. Median distance to the closest transplant center was 15 miles.

In contrast to their pre-study theory that people who lived farthest from a transplant center were less likely to get a transplant, "the likelihood of receiving a kidney transplant from a deceased or living donor among patients living farther away was similar to or greater than those residing within 15 miles of kidney transplant centers," the study authors wrote. "Similarly, and again in contrast to our hypotheses, the adjusted likelihood of kidney transplant was slightly lower among rural dwellers."

The study is in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"Although unexpected, our findings are encouraging because determining eligibility for kidney transplantation is a logistically challenging process that requires sequential diagnostic tests and encounters with health-care clinicians," wrote Dr. Marcello Tonelli, of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues. "The finding that time to transplantation is similar or even shorter among remote- and rural-dwelling patients with kidney failure suggests that disparities in access for remote- and rural-dwellers with other diseases could be reduced or eliminated."

"These data suggest that efforts to improve equitable access to transplantation should not focus on populations defined solely by residence location," the researchers concluded.

More information

The National Kidney Foundation has more about kidney transplantation.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, April 21, 2009

Last Updated: April 21, 2009

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