ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
CANCER
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
No Verdict Yet on Grape Seed Extract vs. Breast Cancer
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Multivitamins Might Prolong Life
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
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Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- At any time of year, but especially in warm weather, don't even think about leaving a child unattended in a vehicle.

New research from the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows the leading cause of non-crash vehicle deaths for children is hyperthermia, better known as heat stroke.

"Even with the windows rolled down two inches, it only takes 10 minutes for the inside of a vehicle to reach deadly temperatures on a hot summer day," Ronald Medford, acting deputy administrator of NHTSA, said in a news release. "Children should never be left alone in or around a motor vehicle, not even for a quick errand. Any number of things can go critically wrong in the blink of an eye."

Strangulation by power windows and carbon monoxide poisoning are among the other leading causes of the 44 deaths and 105,000 injuries to children that occur on average in non-crash-related vehicle incidents each year.

The NHTSA warns adults to never leave a child unattended in a vehicle and never let them play in an unattended vehicle. Always lock the vehicle and roll up windows when parking in an area where children could enter your vehicle. If a child in the area is missing, always check your car interior and trunk first, the organization advises.

If you spot a child alone in a hot vehicle or suspect hyperthermia, call the police or 911 for help. Warning signs of hyperthermia include skin that is red, hot and moist or dry, a lack of sweating, a strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse, nausea or acting strangely. In these cases, try to cool the child rapidly.

If you are not in the habit of driving an infant or small child, experts recommend several strategies to remind you about your little passenger so you do not inadvertently leave him or her behind. These include putting a reminder note somewhere you will notice when leaving the vehicle or placing your purse, briefcase or some other necessary belonging in the back seat so you will have to check there before leaving the vehicle.

SOURCES: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, news release, June 2009