ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
CANCER
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee or Tea Consumption May Lower Stroke Risk
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !

THURSDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- At any time of year, but especially in warm weather, don't even think about leaving a child unattended in a vehicle.

New research from the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows the leading cause of non-crash vehicle deaths for children is hyperthermia, better known as heat stroke.

"Even with the windows rolled down two inches, it only takes 10 minutes for the inside of a vehicle to reach deadly temperatures on a hot summer day," Ronald Medford, acting deputy administrator of NHTSA, said in a news release. "Children should never be left alone in or around a motor vehicle, not even for a quick errand. Any number of things can go critically wrong in the blink of an eye."

Strangulation by power windows and carbon monoxide poisoning are among the other leading causes of the 44 deaths and 105,000 injuries to children that occur on average in non-crash-related vehicle incidents each year.

The NHTSA warns adults to never leave a child unattended in a vehicle and never let them play in an unattended vehicle. Always lock the vehicle and roll up windows when parking in an area where children could enter your vehicle. If a child in the area is missing, always check your car interior and trunk first, the organization advises.

If you spot a child alone in a hot vehicle or suspect hyperthermia, call the police or 911 for help. Warning signs of hyperthermia include skin that is red, hot and moist or dry, a lack of sweating, a strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse, nausea or acting strangely. In these cases, try to cool the child rapidly.

If you are not in the habit of driving an infant or small child, experts recommend several strategies to remind you about your little passenger so you do not inadvertently leave him or her behind. These include putting a reminder note somewhere you will notice when leaving the vehicle or placing your purse, briefcase or some other necessary belonging in the back seat so you will have to check there before leaving the vehicle.

SOURCES: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, news release, June 2009