ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Successful Weight Loss Shows Unique Brain Patterns
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
EYE CARE, VISION
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Maximize Your Run
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Help Your Kids Stay Active
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage

THURSDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- The drug calcium dobesilate does not prevent the development of blindness-causing macular edema in people with diabetes who have mild-to-moderate diabetic retinopathy, a new study has found.

About 50 percent of people who have type 1 diabetes and 30 percent of those with type 2 diabetes develop retinopathy, which is damage to the retina caused by diabetes-related complications. Clinically significant macular edema (CSME) occurs when diabetic retinopathy progresses.

When this happens, fluid and protein deposits accumulate near or at the macula, the central area of the retina, causing it to thicken and swell, according to background information in a news release from The Lancet. The results of the study are in this week's issue of the journal.

The multi-center study included 635 people with type 2 diabetes and mild-to-moderate diabetic retinopathy who were randomly selected to take either calcium dobesilate or a placebo.

CSME developed in 86 of the 324 people who took calcium dobesilate and in 69 of the 311 who took the placebo. The researchers determined that people who took the drug were 32 percent more likely to develop CSME than those who took the placebo.

"Our findings showed that calcium dobesilate could neither prevent occurrence of CSME nor reduce probability of developing CSME during the five-year follow-up period" in the participants, concluded Dr. Christos Haritoglou, of Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, Germany, and his colleagues.

An accompanying commentary stressed the need to "distinguish between the prevention of retinopathy and the prevention of diabetic blindness." It was written by Dr. Anna B. Einarsdottir and Dr. Einar Stefansson of the University of Iceland and Landspitali, National Hospital, in Reykjavik, Iceland.

"Diabetic blindness can be reduced or prevented without reducing retinopathy," they said. "Systemic screening for diabetic retinopathy and preventive laser treatment for those who develop macular edema or proliferative retinopathy reduces the rate of blindness to about 0.5 percent in the diabetic population, regardless of the prevalence of retinopathy."

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about diabetic eye disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: The Lancet, news release, April 16, 2009

Last Updated: April 17, 2009

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