ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Holiday Eating Without the Guilt -- or the Pounds
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- People who eat quickly and until they're full are three times more likely to be overweight than others, a Japanese study says.

For the research, 1,122 men and 2,165 women, ages 30 to 69, filled out a diet history questionnaire about their eating habits, which revealed that 50.9 percent of men and 58.4 percent of women said they ate until they were full, while 45.6 percent of men and 36 percent of women said they ate quickly.

Those who said they ate quickly and until they were full had a higher body mass index (BMI) and total energy intake, and were three times more likely to be overweight than those who didn't eat until they were full and didn't eat quickly.

The study, published online Oct. 22 in the British Medical Journal, shows that eating quickly and until full has "a supra-additive effect on overweight," concluded Professor Hiroyasu Iso, of Osaka University, and colleagues.

Until recently, most adults didn't have the opportunity to consume enough energy to enable the body to store fat, according to background information in the study. But eating behaviors have changed due to increased availability of inexpensive food in larger portions, fast food, fewer families eating together, and eating while distracted (such as watching TV).

The study findings illustrate how current eating patterns in many nations may play a role in the epidemic of obesity, Elizabeth Denney-Wilson, of the University of New South Wales, and Karen Campbell, of Deakin University, both in Australia, wrote in an accompanying editorial.

They said doctors need to work with parents to encourage healthy eating habits in children, such as eating slowly, serving appropriate portion sizes, and eating as a family in a non-distracting environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about factors that contribute to overweight and obesity.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: British Medical Journal, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

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