ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Irregular Heartbeat Tied to Alzheimer's Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Treat Kids to a Safe Halloween
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
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Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- People who eat quickly and until they're full are three times more likely to be overweight than others, a Japanese study says.

For the research, 1,122 men and 2,165 women, ages 30 to 69, filled out a diet history questionnaire about their eating habits, which revealed that 50.9 percent of men and 58.4 percent of women said they ate until they were full, while 45.6 percent of men and 36 percent of women said they ate quickly.

Those who said they ate quickly and until they were full had a higher body mass index (BMI) and total energy intake, and were three times more likely to be overweight than those who didn't eat until they were full and didn't eat quickly.

The study, published online Oct. 22 in the British Medical Journal, shows that eating quickly and until full has "a supra-additive effect on overweight," concluded Professor Hiroyasu Iso, of Osaka University, and colleagues.

Until recently, most adults didn't have the opportunity to consume enough energy to enable the body to store fat, according to background information in the study. But eating behaviors have changed due to increased availability of inexpensive food in larger portions, fast food, fewer families eating together, and eating while distracted (such as watching TV).

The study findings illustrate how current eating patterns in many nations may play a role in the epidemic of obesity, Elizabeth Denney-Wilson, of the University of New South Wales, and Karen Campbell, of Deakin University, both in Australia, wrote in an accompanying editorial.

They said doctors need to work with parents to encourage healthy eating habits in children, such as eating slowly, serving appropriate portion sizes, and eating as a family in a non-distracting environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about factors that contribute to overweight and obesity.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: British Medical Journal, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

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