ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
CANCER
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Low-Fat Diet Does Little to Alter Cholesterol Levels
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
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Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- People who eat quickly and until they're full are three times more likely to be overweight than others, a Japanese study says.

For the research, 1,122 men and 2,165 women, ages 30 to 69, filled out a diet history questionnaire about their eating habits, which revealed that 50.9 percent of men and 58.4 percent of women said they ate until they were full, while 45.6 percent of men and 36 percent of women said they ate quickly.

Those who said they ate quickly and until they were full had a higher body mass index (BMI) and total energy intake, and were three times more likely to be overweight than those who didn't eat until they were full and didn't eat quickly.

The study, published online Oct. 22 in the British Medical Journal, shows that eating quickly and until full has "a supra-additive effect on overweight," concluded Professor Hiroyasu Iso, of Osaka University, and colleagues.

Until recently, most adults didn't have the opportunity to consume enough energy to enable the body to store fat, according to background information in the study. But eating behaviors have changed due to increased availability of inexpensive food in larger portions, fast food, fewer families eating together, and eating while distracted (such as watching TV).

The study findings illustrate how current eating patterns in many nations may play a role in the epidemic of obesity, Elizabeth Denney-Wilson, of the University of New South Wales, and Karen Campbell, of Deakin University, both in Australia, wrote in an accompanying editorial.

They said doctors need to work with parents to encourage healthy eating habits in children, such as eating slowly, serving appropriate portion sizes, and eating as a family in a non-distracting environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about factors that contribute to overweight and obesity.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: British Medical Journal, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

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