ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
EYE CARE, VISION
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
FITNESS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Add your Article

Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- People who eat quickly and until they're full are three times more likely to be overweight than others, a Japanese study says.

For the research, 1,122 men and 2,165 women, ages 30 to 69, filled out a diet history questionnaire about their eating habits, which revealed that 50.9 percent of men and 58.4 percent of women said they ate until they were full, while 45.6 percent of men and 36 percent of women said they ate quickly.

Those who said they ate quickly and until they were full had a higher body mass index (BMI) and total energy intake, and were three times more likely to be overweight than those who didn't eat until they were full and didn't eat quickly.

The study, published online Oct. 22 in the British Medical Journal, shows that eating quickly and until full has "a supra-additive effect on overweight," concluded Professor Hiroyasu Iso, of Osaka University, and colleagues.

Until recently, most adults didn't have the opportunity to consume enough energy to enable the body to store fat, according to background information in the study. But eating behaviors have changed due to increased availability of inexpensive food in larger portions, fast food, fewer families eating together, and eating while distracted (such as watching TV).

The study findings illustrate how current eating patterns in many nations may play a role in the epidemic of obesity, Elizabeth Denney-Wilson, of the University of New South Wales, and Karen Campbell, of Deakin University, both in Australia, wrote in an accompanying editorial.

They said doctors need to work with parents to encourage healthy eating habits in children, such as eating slowly, serving appropriate portion sizes, and eating as a family in a non-distracting environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about factors that contribute to overweight and obesity.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: British Medical Journal, news release, Oct. 22, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 22, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com