ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Green Areas Lower Health Inequities Between Rich, Poor
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Add your Article

Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Greater maternal consumption of fish and longer periods of breast-feeding are tied to better physical and cognitive development in infants, according to a new study.

The report, which looked at mothers and infants from Denmark, provides further evidence that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and compounds in breast milk aid infant development.

"These results, together with findings from other studies of women in the U.S. and the United Kingdom, provide additional evidence that moderate maternal fish intake during pregnancy does not harm child development and may on balance be beneficial," study lead author Emily Oken, an assistant professor at Harvard University, said in a university news release.

Researchers from the Maternal Nutrition Group at the Department of Epidemiology at Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark, also collaborated on the study, which was published in the September issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The research, which looked at 25,446 children born to mothers participating in a Danish study between 1997 and 2002, found that children whose mothers ate the most fish during pregnancy (about 2 ounces a day on average) were more likely to have better motor and cognitive skills. Meanwhile, those whose mothers ate the least fish had the lowest developmental scores at 18 months of age.

Children who were breast-fed for longer periods of time also scored better, especially at 18 months. Breast milk also contains omega-3 fatty acids. The benefit of fish consumption was similar among infants breast-fed for shorter or longer durations.

U.S. women are advised to limit their fish intake to two servings a week because some fish contain high traces of mercury, a known toxin. Most women in the study, however, consumed cod, plaice, salmon, herring and mackerel -- fish that tend to have low-mercury levels.

"In previous work in a population of U.S. women, we similarly found that higher prenatal fish consumption was associated with an overall benefit for child cognitive development, but that higher mercury levels attenuated this benefit," Oken said. "Therefore, women should continue to eat fish -- especially during pregnancy -- but should choose fish types likely to be lower in mercury."

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about mercury levels in fish.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Harvard Medical School, news release, September 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 29, 2008

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