ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Body Fat, Muscle Distribution Linked to RA Disability
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
CANCER
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
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Eating in America Still Unhealthy

(HealthDay News) -- Most Americans don't eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables, says a U.S. government study released Tuesday. And no state has achieved national objectives for consumption of fruits and vegetables, it found.

The goal for the Healthy People 2010 program is to get at least 75 percent of Americans to eat the recommended two or more daily servings of fruit and for at least 50 percent of Americans to consume three or more daily servings of vegetables.

But surveys from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that only 33 percent of adults meet the fruit consumption target and only 27 percent eat the recommended amount of vegetables. The statistics are worse for high school students -- only 32 percent eat the recommended amount of fruit and 13 percent meet the goal for vegetables.

"A diet high in fruits and vegetables is important for optimal child growth, maintaining a healthy weight, and prevention of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and some cancers, all of which currently contribute to health care costs in the United States," Dr. William H. Dietz, director of the CDC's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, said in a CDC news release.

"This report will help states determine what is taking place in their communities and schools and come up with ways to encourage people to eat more fruits and vegetables," Dietz said.

The report -- the State Indicator Report on Fruits and Vegetables, 2009 -- is the first to detail state-by-state data about fruit and vegetable consumption and policies that may help boost fruit and vegetable consumption.

It spotlights three important policy and environmental areas associated with fruit and vegetable consumption: healthier food retail, availability of healthier foods in schools, and food system support.

Food stores that stock a variety of high-quality fruits and vegetables can play a key role in residents' health, the report notes. But only eight states have a policy for healthier food retail improvements that can increase the number of full-service grocery stores in areas where they're lacking, increase the availability of healthier foods in small food stores, and promote healthier foods by providing information to consumers in food stores.

Schools can influence better eating by students, staff, parents and other members of the community. But the report found that only 21 percent of U.S. middle schools and high schools offer fruits and non-fried vegetables in vending machines, school stores or snack bars. Fewer than half the states (21) have policies to support farm-to-school programs that can increase access to fruits and vegetables and teach students about nutrition and agriculture.

The report also mentioned food policy councils, which are organizations that look at access to fresh produce at the community and state levels. Food policy councils make recommendations about policies and programs such as community gardens, farmers' markets, availability of fresh produce in supermarkets and farm-to-school programs. Currently, 59 local food policy councils operate across the United States, and 20 states have a state-level food policy council.

"We have seen the tremendous benefit of state and local officials, health professionals, employers, food store owners, farmers, school staff, and community members working together on food and nutrition issues," CDC epidemiologist Heidi Michels Blanck said in the news release. "Their efforts can help to increase the availability of affordable healthier food choices such as fruits and vegetables."

SOURCES: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Sept. 29, 2009