ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Antioxidant-Rich Foods Lose Nutritional Luster Over Time
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Almost Two-Thirds of Americans Meet Exercise Guidelines
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Natural Relief for Painful Menstrual Cramps
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Eating in America Still Unhealthy

(HealthDay News) -- Most Americans don't eat the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables, says a U.S. government study released Tuesday. And no state has achieved national objectives for consumption of fruits and vegetables, it found.

The goal for the Healthy People 2010 program is to get at least 75 percent of Americans to eat the recommended two or more daily servings of fruit and for at least 50 percent of Americans to consume three or more daily servings of vegetables.

But surveys from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that only 33 percent of adults meet the fruit consumption target and only 27 percent eat the recommended amount of vegetables. The statistics are worse for high school students -- only 32 percent eat the recommended amount of fruit and 13 percent meet the goal for vegetables.

"A diet high in fruits and vegetables is important for optimal child growth, maintaining a healthy weight, and prevention of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and some cancers, all of which currently contribute to health care costs in the United States," Dr. William H. Dietz, director of the CDC's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, said in a CDC news release.

"This report will help states determine what is taking place in their communities and schools and come up with ways to encourage people to eat more fruits and vegetables," Dietz said.

The report -- the State Indicator Report on Fruits and Vegetables, 2009 -- is the first to detail state-by-state data about fruit and vegetable consumption and policies that may help boost fruit and vegetable consumption.

It spotlights three important policy and environmental areas associated with fruit and vegetable consumption: healthier food retail, availability of healthier foods in schools, and food system support.

Food stores that stock a variety of high-quality fruits and vegetables can play a key role in residents' health, the report notes. But only eight states have a policy for healthier food retail improvements that can increase the number of full-service grocery stores in areas where they're lacking, increase the availability of healthier foods in small food stores, and promote healthier foods by providing information to consumers in food stores.

Schools can influence better eating by students, staff, parents and other members of the community. But the report found that only 21 percent of U.S. middle schools and high schools offer fruits and non-fried vegetables in vending machines, school stores or snack bars. Fewer than half the states (21) have policies to support farm-to-school programs that can increase access to fruits and vegetables and teach students about nutrition and agriculture.

The report also mentioned food policy councils, which are organizations that look at access to fresh produce at the community and state levels. Food policy councils make recommendations about policies and programs such as community gardens, farmers' markets, availability of fresh produce in supermarkets and farm-to-school programs. Currently, 59 local food policy councils operate across the United States, and 20 states have a state-level food policy council.

"We have seen the tremendous benefit of state and local officials, health professionals, employers, food store owners, farmers, school staff, and community members working together on food and nutrition issues," CDC epidemiologist Heidi Michels Blanck said in the news release. "Their efforts can help to increase the availability of affordable healthier food choices such as fruits and vegetables."

SOURCES: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release, Sept. 29, 2009