ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Beans May Be Newest Stress-Buster
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
Topical Drugs May Pollute Waterways
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
EYE CARE, VISION
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
FITNESS
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Healthy Living Adds Years to Life
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Eating Less May Slow Aging Process

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting just 300 to 500 calories a day from your diet could be the key to slowing the signs of aging and living longer, according to a new study.

Studies have long shown that reducing calorie intake slows the aging process in rats and mice. A popular theory is that fewer daily calories decreases production of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), which then slows metabolism and tissue aging.

A new study, by Saint Louis University researchers, found this hormone decrease occurs when humans regularly skip rich desserts or substitute a turkey sandwich for a Big Mac and fries every day.

"Our research provides evidence that calorie restriction does work in humans like it has been shown to work in animals," study lead author Edward Weiss, associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at Saint Louis University's Doisy College of Health Sciences, said in a prepared statement. "The next step is to determine if this in fact slows age-related tissue deterioration. The only way to be certain, though, is to do a long-term study."

The findings, published in the June 2008 issue of Rejuvenation Research, are based on a study of healthy but sedentary, non-smoking, 50- to 60-year-old men and post-menopausal women. For a year, the volunteers participated in either: a calorie-restriction group that cut their daily calorie intake by 300 to 500 calories per day; a group that stayed on their regular diet and exercised regularly; or a group that maintained its normal routine.

While those in the calorie-restriction and exercise groups both lost body fat mass, only those in the calorie restriction group also had lower levels of the thyroid hormone.

Although a long-term study is still needed to determine if reducing T3 levels through calorie restriction does indeed slow the aging process, Weiss said cutting back on calories is a good idea.

"There is plenty of evidence the calorie restriction can reduce your risks for many common diseases including cancer, diabetes and heart disease," Weiss said. "And you may live to be substantially older."

Weiss warned that while cutting calories, people need to maintain a healthy diet by eating nutrient-rich foods. He noted that long-term slowing of the metabolism could also make people more prone to weight gain over time.

The key to maintaining a healthy weight, Weiss said, is keeping a consistent diet and exercising regularly.

More information

The Calorie Restriction Society has more about calorie restriction.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Saint Louis University Medical Center, news release, July 2, 2008

Last Updated: July 14, 2008

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