ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
CANCER
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Get to Know the Pap Test
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
EYE CARE, VISION
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Deployment Takes Toll on Army Wives
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
Any Old Cane Won't Do
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
SENIORS
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
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Eating Less May Slow Aging Process

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting just 300 to 500 calories a day from your diet could be the key to slowing the signs of aging and living longer, according to a new study.

Studies have long shown that reducing calorie intake slows the aging process in rats and mice. A popular theory is that fewer daily calories decreases production of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), which then slows metabolism and tissue aging.

A new study, by Saint Louis University researchers, found this hormone decrease occurs when humans regularly skip rich desserts or substitute a turkey sandwich for a Big Mac and fries every day.

"Our research provides evidence that calorie restriction does work in humans like it has been shown to work in animals," study lead author Edward Weiss, associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at Saint Louis University's Doisy College of Health Sciences, said in a prepared statement. "The next step is to determine if this in fact slows age-related tissue deterioration. The only way to be certain, though, is to do a long-term study."

The findings, published in the June 2008 issue of Rejuvenation Research, are based on a study of healthy but sedentary, non-smoking, 50- to 60-year-old men and post-menopausal women. For a year, the volunteers participated in either: a calorie-restriction group that cut their daily calorie intake by 300 to 500 calories per day; a group that stayed on their regular diet and exercised regularly; or a group that maintained its normal routine.

While those in the calorie-restriction and exercise groups both lost body fat mass, only those in the calorie restriction group also had lower levels of the thyroid hormone.

Although a long-term study is still needed to determine if reducing T3 levels through calorie restriction does indeed slow the aging process, Weiss said cutting back on calories is a good idea.

"There is plenty of evidence the calorie restriction can reduce your risks for many common diseases including cancer, diabetes and heart disease," Weiss said. "And you may live to be substantially older."

Weiss warned that while cutting calories, people need to maintain a healthy diet by eating nutrient-rich foods. He noted that long-term slowing of the metabolism could also make people more prone to weight gain over time.

The key to maintaining a healthy weight, Weiss said, is keeping a consistent diet and exercising regularly.

More information

The Calorie Restriction Society has more about calorie restriction.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Saint Louis University Medical Center, news release, July 2, 2008

Last Updated: July 14, 2008

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