ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
CAREGIVING
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Pregnant Rural Women More at Risk
Are Medical Meetings Environmentally Unfriendly?
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Go To Work But Skip The Car
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Help Your Kids Stay Active
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
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Eating Less May Slow Aging Process

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting just 300 to 500 calories a day from your diet could be the key to slowing the signs of aging and living longer, according to a new study.

Studies have long shown that reducing calorie intake slows the aging process in rats and mice. A popular theory is that fewer daily calories decreases production of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), which then slows metabolism and tissue aging.

A new study, by Saint Louis University researchers, found this hormone decrease occurs when humans regularly skip rich desserts or substitute a turkey sandwich for a Big Mac and fries every day.

"Our research provides evidence that calorie restriction does work in humans like it has been shown to work in animals," study lead author Edward Weiss, associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at Saint Louis University's Doisy College of Health Sciences, said in a prepared statement. "The next step is to determine if this in fact slows age-related tissue deterioration. The only way to be certain, though, is to do a long-term study."

The findings, published in the June 2008 issue of Rejuvenation Research, are based on a study of healthy but sedentary, non-smoking, 50- to 60-year-old men and post-menopausal women. For a year, the volunteers participated in either: a calorie-restriction group that cut their daily calorie intake by 300 to 500 calories per day; a group that stayed on their regular diet and exercised regularly; or a group that maintained its normal routine.

While those in the calorie-restriction and exercise groups both lost body fat mass, only those in the calorie restriction group also had lower levels of the thyroid hormone.

Although a long-term study is still needed to determine if reducing T3 levels through calorie restriction does indeed slow the aging process, Weiss said cutting back on calories is a good idea.

"There is plenty of evidence the calorie restriction can reduce your risks for many common diseases including cancer, diabetes and heart disease," Weiss said. "And you may live to be substantially older."

Weiss warned that while cutting calories, people need to maintain a healthy diet by eating nutrient-rich foods. He noted that long-term slowing of the metabolism could also make people more prone to weight gain over time.

The key to maintaining a healthy weight, Weiss said, is keeping a consistent diet and exercising regularly.

More information

The Calorie Restriction Society has more about calorie restriction.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Saint Louis University Medical Center, news release, July 2, 2008

Last Updated: July 14, 2008

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