ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
Vigorous Exercise Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Simple Holistic Approach to Fight the Common Cold
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Add your Article

Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels

An analysis of studies has produced what its authors describe as a precise description of the beneficial effects of nut consumption on cholesterol and other heart-related fats.

It provides "the best evidence yet that eating nuts reduces LDL cholesterol and improves the blood lipids profile," said Dr. Joan Sabate, who chairs the nutrition department at the Loma Linda University School of Public Health in California and was a co-author of the report, published May 10 in Archives of Internal Medicine.

Sabate and fellow researchers at the university pooled data on 583 men and women who had participated in 25 nut consumption trials. The results showed that eating about 2.3 ounces of nuts a day -- a third of a cupful -- reduced total cholesterol levels by 5.1 percent and "bad" LDL cholesterol by 7.4 percent.

That amount of nut eating also improved the ratio of LDL cholesterol to "good" HDL cholesterol by 8.3 percent and caused a decrease of 10.2 percent in triglyceride levels among people with high levels of those blood fats.

Sabate is a leading figure in the somewhat limited field of nut nutrition. His first report on the beneficial effects, published in 1993, led to other studies that eventually prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue a qualified health claim for nuts a decade later.

The 2003 FDA statement said that "scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces of most nuts per day, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease."

On food labels, that claim is followed by a caution: "See nutrition information for fat content."

The FDA statement was issued in response to a petition filed by the International Tree Nut Council Research and Education Foundation, which supports the work done by Sabate and other nut nutrition researchers. The foundation helped fund the latest report.

The new study found that the benefits from eating nuts was greatest among thin people, those with high LDL cholesterol and those consuming a fat-rich diet.

But enthusiasm for nuts should be restrained, Sabate said. They are highly caloric, and thus can contribute to obesity. A 3-ounce-a-day limit was recommended.

Jeannie Gazzaniga-Moloo, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association who is in private practice in Sacramento, Calif., said that "nuts can be a very healthy addition to any diet," but she recommends eating somewhat less of them.

She said she suggests that her clients consume about an ounce a day of nuts -- about 22 walnuts, for example, providing about 150 calories -- as part of their daily diet. "They are rich in protein and dietary fiber as well as numerous proteins and in various vitamins," Gazzaniga-Moloo said.

"They should eat the nuts they enjoy," she said. "They can try a variety."

Sabata said that the type of nuts eaten doesn't seem to matter. The study found essentially the same results for walnuts, almonds, peanuts, pecans, hazelnuts, macadamias and pistachios.

"Nuts are a matrix of healthy nutrients, and the most obvious reason for the cholesterol-lowering effect is their unsaturated fat content," Sabate said. "Nuts also contain fiber, vegetable protein, phytoesterols and other antioxidants."

The best evidence for the beneficial effect of nuts, though, has come from studies of walnuts and almonds, he added.

SOURCES: Joan Sabate, chairman, nutrition department, Loma Linda University School of Public Health, Loma Linda, Calif.; Jeannie Gazzaniga-Moloo, Ph.D., R.D., dietitian, Sacramento, Calif.; May 10, 2010, Archives of Internal Medicine Published on: May 10, 2010