ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Fasting on Alternate Days May Make Dieting Easier
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Meat-Eating Dinosaurs Used Legs and Arms Like Birds
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Moderate Aerobic Exercise Lowers Diabetics' Liver Fat
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Optimism May Boost Immune System
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
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Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Children as young as 9 years old can and should learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), Austrian researchers say.

In a study of 147 students who received six hours of life-support training, 86 percent of the children performed CPR correctly at a follow-up session four months after the training, according to the report published online in the journal Critical Care.

"The usefulness of CPR training in schools has been questioned, since young students may not have the physical and cognitive skills needed to perform such complex tasks correctly," Dr. Fritz Sterz, of the Medical University of Vienna, said in a news release from the journal's publisher.

"We found that, in fact, students as young as 9 years are able to successfully and effectively learn basic life-support skills. As in adults, physical strength may limit depth of chest compressions and ventilation volumes, but skill retention is good," he added.

In the training program, the children were taught CPR, how to use of automatic defibrillators, the correct recovery position and how to call for emergency services. Body mass index, not age, was the major factor in depth of CPR compressions and amount of air exhalation. That means that a well-built 9-year-old child can be just as capable at CPR as an older child, the researchers said.

"Given the excellent performance by the students evaluated in this study, the data support the concept that CPR training can be taught and learned by schoolchildren and that CPR education can be implemented effectively in primary schools at all levels," Sterz and colleagues concluded.

SOURCES: BioMed Central, news release, July 30, 2009