ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
CAREGIVING
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
Greenhouse Gases Hazardous to Your Health
EYE CARE, VISION
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Hand-Washing Habits Still Need Improvement: Survey Says
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
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Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR

FRIDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Children as young as 9 years old can and should learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), Austrian researchers say.

In a study of 147 students who received six hours of life-support training, 86 percent of the children performed CPR correctly at a follow-up session four months after the training, according to the report published online in the journal Critical Care.

"The usefulness of CPR training in schools has been questioned, since young students may not have the physical and cognitive skills needed to perform such complex tasks correctly," Dr. Fritz Sterz, of the Medical University of Vienna, said in a news release from the journal's publisher.

"We found that, in fact, students as young as 9 years are able to successfully and effectively learn basic life-support skills. As in adults, physical strength may limit depth of chest compressions and ventilation volumes, but skill retention is good," he added.

In the training program, the children were taught CPR, how to use of automatic defibrillators, the correct recovery position and how to call for emergency services. Body mass index, not age, was the major factor in depth of CPR compressions and amount of air exhalation. That means that a well-built 9-year-old child can be just as capable at CPR as an older child, the researchers said.

"Given the excellent performance by the students evaluated in this study, the data support the concept that CPR training can be taught and learned by schoolchildren and that CPR education can be implemented effectively in primary schools at all levels," Sterz and colleagues concluded.

SOURCES: BioMed Central, news release, July 30, 2009