ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
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Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!

(HealthDay News) -- Despite 14 years of public education campaigns, only one-third of Americans know about national recommendations for a minimum of 30 minutes of exercise a day, and fewer than half meet that goal, a new study has found.

The lack of awareness is greatest among men, the unemployed and people born in the United States, the researchers said. Their finding came from an analysis of data from 2,381 people who took part in the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey.

One reason why efforts to spread the message about physical activity are having limited success is the "highly generalized, saturating effect of media in the current environment," the authors wrote. "Through varied sources, many are bombarded with multiple physical activity and general health promotion 'recommendations' that may be challenging to differentiate."

A report on the study is in the October issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Since 1995, the U.S. government and national organizations have used radio, TV, print publications and the Internet to make Americans aware they should be doing at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity each day.

If more people followed the recommendations, it could help reduce rates of chronic health problems, said the study's lead author, Gary Bennett, an associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University.

"Physical activity is important for protecting against a large number of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, some cancer, diabetes, even some cognitive disorders," Bennett said in a Duke news release. "So the physical activity recommendations are extremely important to help increase awareness among the American population about the amount of physical activity that is necessary to reduce the risk of developing these diseases," he added.

"We've seen a lot of discussion about prevention in health-care reform debates over the last few months, and it's becoming clear that increasing physical activity among Americans may, in the long run, reduce some of the major costs that burden our health-care system," Bennett said.

SOURCES: Duke University, news release, Sept. 24, 2009