ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
CANCER
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Small Doses of Carbon Monoxide Might Help Stroke Victims
Improved Fungicides May Be Easier on Environment
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
FITNESS
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Healthy Eating While On Vacation
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture and exercise may bring some relief to the one in 10 women of childbearing age who suffer from a common endocrine disease called polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).

Women with the condition have elevated levels of androgen hormones -- including testosterone -- and often develop ovarian cysts, irregular menstrual cycles and infertility. A key feature of the disease is an increase in the high muscle sympathetic nerve activity. This regular constricting of blood vessels, which normally occurs during the body's fight or flight response to danger, can increase a woman's chances of developing diabetes and high blood pressure or having a heart attack or stroke.

The study, appearing online in a recent issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, looked at 20 women who received either regular low-frequency electro-acupuncture on body parts commonly thought to be linked to the ovaries, took part in thrice-weekly moderate exercise or received no treatment at all over a 16-week period.

When comparing the sympathetic nerve activity before and after the study, researchers found noticeably decreased activity in the acupuncture and exercise groups compared with the control group. In the acupuncture group, the team also found significantly lower testosterone levels. High levels of this "male" hormone predict and have been thought to trigger chronic sympathetic nerve activity in women.

Those who received acupuncture also had regular menstrual cycles, while the exercise and control groups showed no change.

"The findings that low-frequency electro-acupuncture and exercise decrease sympathetic nerve activity in women with PCOS indicates a possible alternative non-pharmacologic approach to reduce cardiovascular risk in these patients," researcher Elisabet Stener-Victorin of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, said in a news release.

The authors noted that the study's small sample size was one of several limitations, and it may require more research into the issue before a definite conclusion could be drawn.

SOURCES: The American Physiological Society, news release, June 29, 2009 Published on: July 09, 2009