ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
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'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
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Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
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Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
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Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
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Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
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Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
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Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Health Tip: After Liposuction
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Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
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Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
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Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
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Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
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EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
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Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
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Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Sleep and Do Better
When Clocks Change, Body May Need Time to Adjust
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Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
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Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
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MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

THURSDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture and exercise may bring some relief to the one in 10 women of childbearing age who suffer from a common endocrine disease called polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).

Women with the condition have elevated levels of androgen hormones -- including testosterone -- and often develop ovarian cysts, irregular menstrual cycles and infertility. A key feature of the disease is an increase in the high muscle sympathetic nerve activity. This regular constricting of blood vessels, which normally occurs during the body's fight or flight response to danger, can increase a woman's chances of developing diabetes and high blood pressure or having a heart attack or stroke.

The study, appearing online in a recent issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, looked at 20 women who received either regular low-frequency electro-acupuncture on body parts commonly thought to be linked to the ovaries, took part in thrice-weekly moderate exercise or received no treatment at all over a 16-week period.

When comparing the sympathetic nerve activity before and after the study, researchers found noticeably decreased activity in the acupuncture and exercise groups compared with the control group. In the acupuncture group, the team also found significantly lower testosterone levels. High levels of this "male" hormone predict and have been thought to trigger chronic sympathetic nerve activity in women.

Those who received acupuncture also had regular menstrual cycles, while the exercise and control groups showed no change.

"The findings that low-frequency electro-acupuncture and exercise decrease sympathetic nerve activity in women with PCOS indicates a possible alternative non-pharmacologic approach to reduce cardiovascular risk in these patients," researcher Elisabet Stener-Victorin of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, said in a news release.

The authors noted that the study's small sample size was one of several limitations, and it may require more research into the issue before a definite conclusion could be drawn.

SOURCES: The American Physiological Society, news release, June 29, 2009 Published on: July 09, 2009