ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
CANCER
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Old-Growth Forests Dying Off in U.S. West
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
FITNESS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Can You Talk Your Way to Happy?
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Add your Article

Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old

(HealthDay News) -- Older adults who get regular exercise may live longer and be at lower risk for physical disabilities, according to an Israeli study.

The research included almost 1,900 people born in 1920 and 1921 who were assessed at ages 70, 78 and 85. Those who did less than four hours of physical activity per week were considered sedentary, while those who exercised about four hours a week, did vigorous activities such as swimming or jogging at least twice a week, or those who got regular physical activity (such as walking at least an hour a day) were considered physically active.

The researchers found that 53.4 percent of participants were physically active at age 70, 76.9 percent at age 77, and 64 percent at age 85. Compared to those who were sedentary, physically active people were 12 percent less likely to die between ages 70 and 78, 15 percent less likely to die between ages 78 and 85, and 17 percent less likely to die between ages 85 and 88.

Physically active participants also experienced fewer declines in their ability to perform daily tasks, were more likely to be able to live independently, and were less likely to be lonely and to rate their health as poor.

The findings appear in the Sept. 14 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

By improving cardiovascular fitness, slowing loss of muscle mass, reducing fat, improving immunity and suppressing inflammation, physical activity may delay the onset of decline that can begin when a person is no longer able to perform daily activities, the study authors suggested.

"Despite the increasing likelihood of comorbidity, frailty, dependence and ever-shortening life expectancy, remaining and even starting to be physically active increases the likelihood of living longer and staying functionally independent," wrote Dr. Jochanan Stessman and colleagues at Hebrew University Medical Center and Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem.

"The clinical ramifications are far-reaching," they added. "As this rapidly growing sector of the population assumes a prominent position in preventive and public health measures, our findings clearly support the continued encouragement of physical activity, even among the oldest old. Indeed, it seems that it is never too late to start."

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives Journals, news release, Sept. 14, 2009