ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
CANCER
Vitamin D May Improve Melanoma Survival
Some Spices Cut Cancer Risk That Comes With Grilled Burgers
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
More Educated Choose Healthier Foods, But Pay More
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Add your Article

Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old

(HealthDay News) -- Older adults who get regular exercise may live longer and be at lower risk for physical disabilities, according to an Israeli study.

The research included almost 1,900 people born in 1920 and 1921 who were assessed at ages 70, 78 and 85. Those who did less than four hours of physical activity per week were considered sedentary, while those who exercised about four hours a week, did vigorous activities such as swimming or jogging at least twice a week, or those who got regular physical activity (such as walking at least an hour a day) were considered physically active.

The researchers found that 53.4 percent of participants were physically active at age 70, 76.9 percent at age 77, and 64 percent at age 85. Compared to those who were sedentary, physically active people were 12 percent less likely to die between ages 70 and 78, 15 percent less likely to die between ages 78 and 85, and 17 percent less likely to die between ages 85 and 88.

Physically active participants also experienced fewer declines in their ability to perform daily tasks, were more likely to be able to live independently, and were less likely to be lonely and to rate their health as poor.

The findings appear in the Sept. 14 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

By improving cardiovascular fitness, slowing loss of muscle mass, reducing fat, improving immunity and suppressing inflammation, physical activity may delay the onset of decline that can begin when a person is no longer able to perform daily activities, the study authors suggested.

"Despite the increasing likelihood of comorbidity, frailty, dependence and ever-shortening life expectancy, remaining and even starting to be physically active increases the likelihood of living longer and staying functionally independent," wrote Dr. Jochanan Stessman and colleagues at Hebrew University Medical Center and Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem.

"The clinical ramifications are far-reaching," they added. "As this rapidly growing sector of the population assumes a prominent position in preventive and public health measures, our findings clearly support the continued encouragement of physical activity, even among the oldest old. Indeed, it seems that it is never too late to start."

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives Journals, news release, Sept. 14, 2009