ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Seasons Arriving 2 Days Earlier, Study Says
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Vinegar Might Help Keep Off Pounds
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
A Little Alcohol May Help the Heart: Studies
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Countdown to Hair Loss
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old

(HealthDay News) -- Older adults who get regular exercise may live longer and be at lower risk for physical disabilities, according to an Israeli study.

The research included almost 1,900 people born in 1920 and 1921 who were assessed at ages 70, 78 and 85. Those who did less than four hours of physical activity per week were considered sedentary, while those who exercised about four hours a week, did vigorous activities such as swimming or jogging at least twice a week, or those who got regular physical activity (such as walking at least an hour a day) were considered physically active.

The researchers found that 53.4 percent of participants were physically active at age 70, 76.9 percent at age 77, and 64 percent at age 85. Compared to those who were sedentary, physically active people were 12 percent less likely to die between ages 70 and 78, 15 percent less likely to die between ages 78 and 85, and 17 percent less likely to die between ages 85 and 88.

Physically active participants also experienced fewer declines in their ability to perform daily tasks, were more likely to be able to live independently, and were less likely to be lonely and to rate their health as poor.

The findings appear in the Sept. 14 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

By improving cardiovascular fitness, slowing loss of muscle mass, reducing fat, improving immunity and suppressing inflammation, physical activity may delay the onset of decline that can begin when a person is no longer able to perform daily activities, the study authors suggested.

"Despite the increasing likelihood of comorbidity, frailty, dependence and ever-shortening life expectancy, remaining and even starting to be physically active increases the likelihood of living longer and staying functionally independent," wrote Dr. Jochanan Stessman and colleagues at Hebrew University Medical Center and Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem.

"The clinical ramifications are far-reaching," they added. "As this rapidly growing sector of the population assumes a prominent position in preventive and public health measures, our findings clearly support the continued encouragement of physical activity, even among the oldest old. Indeed, it seems that it is never too late to start."

SOURCES: JAMA/Archives Journals, news release, Sept. 14, 2009