ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
CANCER
Minorities Distrust Medical System More
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Dark Chocolate May Lower Stroke Risk
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Seniors Cope With Sleep Loss Better Than Young Adults
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms

(HealthDay News) -- New moms who breast-feed may need exercise -- including cardiovascular activity and strength training -- to fight off a loss of bone density caused by lower levels of calcium, research shows.

A new study published in the October issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found that new mothers who didn't exercise lost about 7 percent of the bone mineral density in their lower spine after giving birth. The findings come from an analysis of 20 women whose bone density was tested between four and 20 weeks post-partum.

"During lactation, women transfer around 200 milligrams of calcium per day from their own stores to their breast milk," researcher Cheryl Lovelady said in a news release from the American College of Sports Medicine.

"Calcium is critically linked to bone density and health, and this depletion can result in loss of bone mineral density," she added. "When mothers wean their infants, bone mineral density usually returns to normal levels. We proposed that weight-bearing exercise would minimize bone losses during lactation and decrease the risk of osteoporosis later in life."

Exercise decreased the level of bone loss during breast-feeding, the researchers found. A combination of strength training and aerobic exercise for three days a week resulted in less loss of bone mineral density: 4.8 percent compared to 7 percent among those who didn't exercise.

Women who performed weight-bearing exercise also lowered their percentage of body fat and increased their strength, the study authors noted.

"Women in our study found themselves overall healthier and stronger after completing the post-partum exercise program, which lasted just 16 weeks," Lovelady said. "Moreover, implementing this exercise into daily life can help entire families get active and improve their overall health."

SOURCES: American College of Sports Medicine, news release, Sept. 28, 2009 Published on: October 08, 2009