ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
EYE CARE, VISION
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Eat Light - Live Longer
U.S. Prepares for Possible Return of Swine Flu in Fall
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
Help Your Kids Stay Active
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
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Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms

(HealthDay News) -- New moms who breast-feed may need exercise -- including cardiovascular activity and strength training -- to fight off a loss of bone density caused by lower levels of calcium, research shows.

A new study published in the October issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found that new mothers who didn't exercise lost about 7 percent of the bone mineral density in their lower spine after giving birth. The findings come from an analysis of 20 women whose bone density was tested between four and 20 weeks post-partum.

"During lactation, women transfer around 200 milligrams of calcium per day from their own stores to their breast milk," researcher Cheryl Lovelady said in a news release from the American College of Sports Medicine.

"Calcium is critically linked to bone density and health, and this depletion can result in loss of bone mineral density," she added. "When mothers wean their infants, bone mineral density usually returns to normal levels. We proposed that weight-bearing exercise would minimize bone losses during lactation and decrease the risk of osteoporosis later in life."

Exercise decreased the level of bone loss during breast-feeding, the researchers found. A combination of strength training and aerobic exercise for three days a week resulted in less loss of bone mineral density: 4.8 percent compared to 7 percent among those who didn't exercise.

Women who performed weight-bearing exercise also lowered their percentage of body fat and increased their strength, the study authors noted.

"Women in our study found themselves overall healthier and stronger after completing the post-partum exercise program, which lasted just 16 weeks," Lovelady said. "Moreover, implementing this exercise into daily life can help entire families get active and improve their overall health."

SOURCES: American College of Sports Medicine, news release, Sept. 28, 2009 Published on: October 08, 2009