ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
EYE CARE, VISION
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
FITNESS
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
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Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%

Physical exercise can decrease the risk of developing lung cancer by up to 45 percent in former smokers, while proper diet can decrease it even further, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's Sixth Annual International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research in Philadelphia.

Researchers studied 3,800 non-Hispanic white women and men using a pairing system that sorts people according to smoking status. Therefore, smokers with lung cancer would only be compared to smokers without lung cancer, with the same pairing taking place for former smokers and those who have never smoked. Researchers compared those who had not developed lung cancer based on a variety of factors including exposure to secondhand smoke, dust exposure, family cancer history, personal respiratory history, diet and exercise.

Exercise was determined based on whether the participants gardened or not. According to researcher Michele Forman, "gardening is one of the few activities that people with lung cancer report doing."

Former smokers who gardened reduced their lung cancer risk by 45 percent, while current smokers who gardened reduced their risk by 33 percent. Former smokers who gardened and who also ate four or more salads per week reduced their risk by 67 percent. Among current smokers, the risk reduction from both gardening and high salad intake was 71 percent.

According to Forman, salad consumption "is a marker for consumption of many vegetables."

"We are trying to understand what components of lifestyle can reduce lung cancer risk in people who have quit smoking, which has been a neglected field of study," Forman said. She noted that further research is needed to make sure that exercise from gardening is actually the cause of the correlation, rather than gardening being associated with some other risk-reducing factor, such as low alcohol consumption.