ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Bone Density Predicts Chances of Breast Cancer
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
CANCER
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Low Vitamin D Levels May Initiate Cancer Development
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
Pollution Particles Impair Blood Vessel Function
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
EYE CARE, VISION
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%

Physical exercise can decrease the risk of developing lung cancer by up to 45 percent in former smokers, while proper diet can decrease it even further, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's Sixth Annual International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research in Philadelphia.

Researchers studied 3,800 non-Hispanic white women and men using a pairing system that sorts people according to smoking status. Therefore, smokers with lung cancer would only be compared to smokers without lung cancer, with the same pairing taking place for former smokers and those who have never smoked. Researchers compared those who had not developed lung cancer based on a variety of factors including exposure to secondhand smoke, dust exposure, family cancer history, personal respiratory history, diet and exercise.

Exercise was determined based on whether the participants gardened or not. According to researcher Michele Forman, "gardening is one of the few activities that people with lung cancer report doing."

Former smokers who gardened reduced their lung cancer risk by 45 percent, while current smokers who gardened reduced their risk by 33 percent. Former smokers who gardened and who also ate four or more salads per week reduced their risk by 67 percent. Among current smokers, the risk reduction from both gardening and high salad intake was 71 percent.

According to Forman, salad consumption "is a marker for consumption of many vegetables."

"We are trying to understand what components of lifestyle can reduce lung cancer risk in people who have quit smoking, which has been a neglected field of study," Forman said. She noted that further research is needed to make sure that exercise from gardening is actually the cause of the correlation, rather than gardening being associated with some other risk-reducing factor, such as low alcohol consumption.