ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old

-- Regular exercise reduces the risk of falls in both young and old, a new study shows.

Falls are a major hazard in the United States, with about 19,000 people dying from them each year and an estimated 8 million seeking treatment in emergency rooms annually.

The protective effect of exercise was documented by University of Pittsburgh researchers, who analyzed data from people taking part in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study from 1970 to 1989 and in a follow-up survey conducted in 1990. The survey asked whether they had fallen within the previous year and, if so, what they were doing when they fell.

Participants also took a treadmill test and answered questions about how many minutes of aerobic exercise they got each week.

Twenty percent of the 10,615 participants, aged 20 to 87, reported falling in the previous year. Of those, 15 percent fell while walking.

In general, people need about two hours of exercise a week to reduce the risk of falls, the researchers found.

Women were 2.8 times more likely than men to fall while walking, but the women's fitness levels appeared to make little difference. Fitness levels in men were important, however: Men with low fitness levels were 2.2 times more likely to fall than men with high fitness levels.

"We were surprised to find that fitness and physical activity seem to have a stronger relationship with walking-related falls in men compared with women," lead author Dr. Kristin Mertz, in the epidemiology department at the University of Pittsburgh, said in a Center for the Advancement of Health news release.

Although falls are the leading cause of injuries among people aged 65 or older, researchers also found that young people topple over as much as seniors.

"We were not surprised that people 65 and older were no more likely to report falling than younger people, given that younger people are more likely to engage in more risky activities, such as standing on ladders, running and playing sports," Mertz said.

SOURCES: Center for the Advancement of Health, June 8, 2010, news release. Published on: June 10, 2010