ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Drinking Cuts Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
CANCER
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Optimism May Boost Immune System
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old

-- Regular exercise reduces the risk of falls in both young and old, a new study shows.

Falls are a major hazard in the United States, with about 19,000 people dying from them each year and an estimated 8 million seeking treatment in emergency rooms annually.

The protective effect of exercise was documented by University of Pittsburgh researchers, who analyzed data from people taking part in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study from 1970 to 1989 and in a follow-up survey conducted in 1990. The survey asked whether they had fallen within the previous year and, if so, what they were doing when they fell.

Participants also took a treadmill test and answered questions about how many minutes of aerobic exercise they got each week.

Twenty percent of the 10,615 participants, aged 20 to 87, reported falling in the previous year. Of those, 15 percent fell while walking.

In general, people need about two hours of exercise a week to reduce the risk of falls, the researchers found.

Women were 2.8 times more likely than men to fall while walking, but the women's fitness levels appeared to make little difference. Fitness levels in men were important, however: Men with low fitness levels were 2.2 times more likely to fall than men with high fitness levels.

"We were surprised to find that fitness and physical activity seem to have a stronger relationship with walking-related falls in men compared with women," lead author Dr. Kristin Mertz, in the epidemiology department at the University of Pittsburgh, said in a Center for the Advancement of Health news release.

Although falls are the leading cause of injuries among people aged 65 or older, researchers also found that young people topple over as much as seniors.

"We were not surprised that people 65 and older were no more likely to report falling than younger people, given that younger people are more likely to engage in more risky activities, such as standing on ladders, running and playing sports," Mertz said.

SOURCES: Center for the Advancement of Health, June 8, 2010, news release. Published on: June 10, 2010