ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
CANCER
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
CAREGIVING
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
The Raw Food Diet
Leafy Greens Top Risky Food List
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
Hypertension May Hit Black Males Earlier
Bed Bugs Bring No Disease Danger
EYE CARE, VISION
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
The Unmedicated Mind
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
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Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old

-- Regular exercise reduces the risk of falls in both young and old, a new study shows.

Falls are a major hazard in the United States, with about 19,000 people dying from them each year and an estimated 8 million seeking treatment in emergency rooms annually.

The protective effect of exercise was documented by University of Pittsburgh researchers, who analyzed data from people taking part in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study from 1970 to 1989 and in a follow-up survey conducted in 1990. The survey asked whether they had fallen within the previous year and, if so, what they were doing when they fell.

Participants also took a treadmill test and answered questions about how many minutes of aerobic exercise they got each week.

Twenty percent of the 10,615 participants, aged 20 to 87, reported falling in the previous year. Of those, 15 percent fell while walking.

In general, people need about two hours of exercise a week to reduce the risk of falls, the researchers found.

Women were 2.8 times more likely than men to fall while walking, but the women's fitness levels appeared to make little difference. Fitness levels in men were important, however: Men with low fitness levels were 2.2 times more likely to fall than men with high fitness levels.

"We were surprised to find that fitness and physical activity seem to have a stronger relationship with walking-related falls in men compared with women," lead author Dr. Kristin Mertz, in the epidemiology department at the University of Pittsburgh, said in a Center for the Advancement of Health news release.

Although falls are the leading cause of injuries among people aged 65 or older, researchers also found that young people topple over as much as seniors.

"We were not surprised that people 65 and older were no more likely to report falling than younger people, given that younger people are more likely to engage in more risky activities, such as standing on ladders, running and playing sports," Mertz said.

SOURCES: Center for the Advancement of Health, June 8, 2010, news release. Published on: June 10, 2010