ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Varicose, Spider Veins May Be Inevitable for Some
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
CAREGIVING
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
10 Beginner Tips for Fast Weight Loss, the Low-Carb Way!
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
FITNESS
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Healthy Living Adds Years to Life
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Countdown to Hair Loss
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Iodine in Prenatal Vitamins Varies Widely
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Add your Article

Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old

-- Regular exercise reduces the risk of falls in both young and old, a new study shows.

Falls are a major hazard in the United States, with about 19,000 people dying from them each year and an estimated 8 million seeking treatment in emergency rooms annually.

The protective effect of exercise was documented by University of Pittsburgh researchers, who analyzed data from people taking part in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study from 1970 to 1989 and in a follow-up survey conducted in 1990. The survey asked whether they had fallen within the previous year and, if so, what they were doing when they fell.

Participants also took a treadmill test and answered questions about how many minutes of aerobic exercise they got each week.

Twenty percent of the 10,615 participants, aged 20 to 87, reported falling in the previous year. Of those, 15 percent fell while walking.

In general, people need about two hours of exercise a week to reduce the risk of falls, the researchers found.

Women were 2.8 times more likely than men to fall while walking, but the women's fitness levels appeared to make little difference. Fitness levels in men were important, however: Men with low fitness levels were 2.2 times more likely to fall than men with high fitness levels.

"We were surprised to find that fitness and physical activity seem to have a stronger relationship with walking-related falls in men compared with women," lead author Dr. Kristin Mertz, in the epidemiology department at the University of Pittsburgh, said in a Center for the Advancement of Health news release.

Although falls are the leading cause of injuries among people aged 65 or older, researchers also found that young people topple over as much as seniors.

"We were not surprised that people 65 and older were no more likely to report falling than younger people, given that younger people are more likely to engage in more risky activities, such as standing on ladders, running and playing sports," Mertz said.

SOURCES: Center for the Advancement of Health, June 8, 2010, news release. Published on: June 10, 2010