ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Low Vitamin D Raises Women's Hip Fracture Risk
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
EYE CARE, VISION
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Antioxidants Blunt Exercise Benefit, Study Shows
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Week of Historic Senate Hearings on Integrative Medicine May Open New Doors
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Don't Leave Your Kids In The Car !
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
Add your Article

Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old

-- Regular exercise reduces the risk of falls in both young and old, a new study shows.

Falls are a major hazard in the United States, with about 19,000 people dying from them each year and an estimated 8 million seeking treatment in emergency rooms annually.

The protective effect of exercise was documented by University of Pittsburgh researchers, who analyzed data from people taking part in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study from 1970 to 1989 and in a follow-up survey conducted in 1990. The survey asked whether they had fallen within the previous year and, if so, what they were doing when they fell.

Participants also took a treadmill test and answered questions about how many minutes of aerobic exercise they got each week.

Twenty percent of the 10,615 participants, aged 20 to 87, reported falling in the previous year. Of those, 15 percent fell while walking.

In general, people need about two hours of exercise a week to reduce the risk of falls, the researchers found.

Women were 2.8 times more likely than men to fall while walking, but the women's fitness levels appeared to make little difference. Fitness levels in men were important, however: Men with low fitness levels were 2.2 times more likely to fall than men with high fitness levels.

"We were surprised to find that fitness and physical activity seem to have a stronger relationship with walking-related falls in men compared with women," lead author Dr. Kristin Mertz, in the epidemiology department at the University of Pittsburgh, said in a Center for the Advancement of Health news release.

Although falls are the leading cause of injuries among people aged 65 or older, researchers also found that young people topple over as much as seniors.

"We were not surprised that people 65 and older were no more likely to report falling than younger people, given that younger people are more likely to engage in more risky activities, such as standing on ladders, running and playing sports," Mertz said.

SOURCES: Center for the Advancement of Health, June 8, 2010, news release. Published on: June 10, 2010