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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
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ANIMAL CARE
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BONES & JOINTS
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CANCER
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Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
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CAREGIVING
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More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Robots May Come to Aging Boomers' Rescue
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
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COSMETIC
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DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Any Exercise Good After a Heart Attack
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Meat Additives May Be Dangerous for Kidney Patients
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
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HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
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HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
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INFECTIOUS DISEASE
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INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
MEN'S HEALTH
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Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
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PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
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Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old

-- Regular exercise reduces the risk of falls in both young and old, a new study shows.

Falls are a major hazard in the United States, with about 19,000 people dying from them each year and an estimated 8 million seeking treatment in emergency rooms annually.

The protective effect of exercise was documented by University of Pittsburgh researchers, who analyzed data from people taking part in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study from 1970 to 1989 and in a follow-up survey conducted in 1990. The survey asked whether they had fallen within the previous year and, if so, what they were doing when they fell.

Participants also took a treadmill test and answered questions about how many minutes of aerobic exercise they got each week.

Twenty percent of the 10,615 participants, aged 20 to 87, reported falling in the previous year. Of those, 15 percent fell while walking.

In general, people need about two hours of exercise a week to reduce the risk of falls, the researchers found.

Women were 2.8 times more likely than men to fall while walking, but the women's fitness levels appeared to make little difference. Fitness levels in men were important, however: Men with low fitness levels were 2.2 times more likely to fall than men with high fitness levels.

"We were surprised to find that fitness and physical activity seem to have a stronger relationship with walking-related falls in men compared with women," lead author Dr. Kristin Mertz, in the epidemiology department at the University of Pittsburgh, said in a Center for the Advancement of Health news release.

Although falls are the leading cause of injuries among people aged 65 or older, researchers also found that young people topple over as much as seniors.

"We were not surprised that people 65 and older were no more likely to report falling than younger people, given that younger people are more likely to engage in more risky activities, such as standing on ladders, running and playing sports," Mertz said.

SOURCES: Center for the Advancement of Health, June 8, 2010, news release. Published on: June 10, 2010