ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Scientists ID New Genes Tied to Crohn's Disease
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Moms Who Breast-Feed Less Likely to Neglect Child
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Walking Golf Course Affects Swing, Performance
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Fatality Rate a 'Little Bit' Higher Than That of Seasonal Flu
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise may play a key role in helping people recover from total knee replacement and knee osteoarthritis (OA), two new studies show.

After receiving a total knee replacement, patients following a six-week progressive strengthening program showed much improvement in strength, function and pain when compared to those following the conventional care of inpatient rehabilitation and home physical therapy, according to a University of Delaware study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Those in the exercise program -- which consisted of sessions focused on knee extension, range of motion, kneecap mobility, quadriceps strength, pain control and gait two to three times a week -- also showed much greater strength in their quadriceps and functional performance than the other group a year after the program.

Half of those in the exercise group also received neuromuscular electrical stimulation, but the additional treatment didn't seem to have any further effect on the results.

"Our data suggest that individuals who do not undertake an intensive rehabilitation program following [total knee replacement] are clearly at a disadvantage," the authors concluded. "Failing to obtain adequate functional recovery may accelerate functional decline and predispose these individuals to an early loss of functional independence as they age."

The other study, published in the same issue of Arthritis Care & Research, found that people who engaged in activities with low muscle strength (such as light household work) or high mechanical strain (such as dancing or tennis) had a greater risk of developing knee osteoarthritis.

VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam based its findings on physical activity questionnaires filled out by almost 1,700 seniors throughout a 12-year period. The activities were scored for intensity, mechanical strain, turning action and muscle strength, then evaluated. The findings also took into account demographics, health and physical activity from earlier in life.

The authors noted a particular lack of a link between being overweight and mechanical strain to knee osteoarthritis.

"This finding could indicate that the higher risk of knee OA in obese persons may be explained by factors other than increased mechanical strain, and higher levels of physical activity may not negatively affect knee health in heavier respondents," the authors wrote.

The authors called for more research to determine the optimal amount of daily activity needed for healthy joints for each activity before using their findings to advise exercise routines for older adults.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Wiley-Blackwell, news release, Jan. 29, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 04, 2009

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