ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
CANCER
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
Air Pollution Raises Risk of Heart Disease, Death
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Natural Therapies for Menopause
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Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise may play a key role in helping people recover from total knee replacement and knee osteoarthritis (OA), two new studies show.

After receiving a total knee replacement, patients following a six-week progressive strengthening program showed much improvement in strength, function and pain when compared to those following the conventional care of inpatient rehabilitation and home physical therapy, according to a University of Delaware study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Those in the exercise program -- which consisted of sessions focused on knee extension, range of motion, kneecap mobility, quadriceps strength, pain control and gait two to three times a week -- also showed much greater strength in their quadriceps and functional performance than the other group a year after the program.

Half of those in the exercise group also received neuromuscular electrical stimulation, but the additional treatment didn't seem to have any further effect on the results.

"Our data suggest that individuals who do not undertake an intensive rehabilitation program following [total knee replacement] are clearly at a disadvantage," the authors concluded. "Failing to obtain adequate functional recovery may accelerate functional decline and predispose these individuals to an early loss of functional independence as they age."

The other study, published in the same issue of Arthritis Care & Research, found that people who engaged in activities with low muscle strength (such as light household work) or high mechanical strain (such as dancing or tennis) had a greater risk of developing knee osteoarthritis.

VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam based its findings on physical activity questionnaires filled out by almost 1,700 seniors throughout a 12-year period. The activities were scored for intensity, mechanical strain, turning action and muscle strength, then evaluated. The findings also took into account demographics, health and physical activity from earlier in life.

The authors noted a particular lack of a link between being overweight and mechanical strain to knee osteoarthritis.

"This finding could indicate that the higher risk of knee OA in obese persons may be explained by factors other than increased mechanical strain, and higher levels of physical activity may not negatively affect knee health in heavier respondents," the authors wrote.

The authors called for more research to determine the optimal amount of daily activity needed for healthy joints for each activity before using their findings to advise exercise routines for older adults.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Wiley-Blackwell, news release, Jan. 29, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 04, 2009

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