ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Gene Studies Reveal Cancer's Secrets
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
CAREGIVING
Newborn Screenings Now Required Across U.S.
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Heavy Traffic Can Be Heartbreaking
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
FITNESS
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
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Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise may play a key role in helping people recover from total knee replacement and knee osteoarthritis (OA), two new studies show.

After receiving a total knee replacement, patients following a six-week progressive strengthening program showed much improvement in strength, function and pain when compared to those following the conventional care of inpatient rehabilitation and home physical therapy, according to a University of Delaware study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Those in the exercise program -- which consisted of sessions focused on knee extension, range of motion, kneecap mobility, quadriceps strength, pain control and gait two to three times a week -- also showed much greater strength in their quadriceps and functional performance than the other group a year after the program.

Half of those in the exercise group also received neuromuscular electrical stimulation, but the additional treatment didn't seem to have any further effect on the results.

"Our data suggest that individuals who do not undertake an intensive rehabilitation program following [total knee replacement] are clearly at a disadvantage," the authors concluded. "Failing to obtain adequate functional recovery may accelerate functional decline and predispose these individuals to an early loss of functional independence as they age."

The other study, published in the same issue of Arthritis Care & Research, found that people who engaged in activities with low muscle strength (such as light household work) or high mechanical strain (such as dancing or tennis) had a greater risk of developing knee osteoarthritis.

VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam based its findings on physical activity questionnaires filled out by almost 1,700 seniors throughout a 12-year period. The activities were scored for intensity, mechanical strain, turning action and muscle strength, then evaluated. The findings also took into account demographics, health and physical activity from earlier in life.

The authors noted a particular lack of a link between being overweight and mechanical strain to knee osteoarthritis.

"This finding could indicate that the higher risk of knee OA in obese persons may be explained by factors other than increased mechanical strain, and higher levels of physical activity may not negatively affect knee health in heavier respondents," the authors wrote.

The authors called for more research to determine the optimal amount of daily activity needed for healthy joints for each activity before using their findings to advise exercise routines for older adults.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about osteoarthritis.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Wiley-Blackwell, news release, Jan. 29, 2009

Last Updated: Feb. 04, 2009

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