ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Scientists Discover How Osteoarthritis Destroys Cartilage
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
CAREGIVING
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Mutation May Cause Some Cases of Seasonal Affective Disorder
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
FITNESS
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Countdown to Hair Loss
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
SENIORS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Add your Article

Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Tongue and throat exercises may help people with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) find relief, a new report says.

A three-month program helped reduce OSA severity by 40 percent in the test subjects and improved symptoms such as low oxygen saturation levels in blood, sleepiness, snoring and poor sleep quality, according to the findings in the second issue for May of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Of the 10 moderate OSA sufferers who did the exercises, eight were reclassified afterward as having only a mild condition and two were upgraded to having no OSA.

"It was commonly thought among doctors that strengthening and toning oropharyngeal muscles would have no benefit to the patient during sleep, but a recent study showed that didgeridoo playing helped decrease snoring and OSA," study investigator Dr. Geraldo Lorenzi-Filho of the sleep laboratory at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, said in an American Thoracic Society news release. "This was a change of paradigm, and indicated that not everything you do during the day is lost during sleep."

For the study, 16 people diagnosed with mild to moderate OSA performed a daily and weekly regimen of tongue and pharyngeal exercises, while 15 other sufferers performed a placebo treatment of deep breathing and nasal rinsing with saline solution. The control group experienced no change in their condition, and neither group experienced a change in weight or body size, two factors in the cause of OSA.

"The muscles of the upper airways are extremely complex, and the mechanisms leading to OSA are far from being well understood," Lorenzi-Filho said. "A strong muscle may be working on the wrong direction and not necessarily helping to open the airways. The overall set of exercises we tested target the correct physiology of the upper airway and should promote remodeling of the upper airways."

He said the researchers were unsure exactly how the exercises caused the change and if all of them were equally effective, but suggested further research would explore these questions.

More information

The American Sleep Apnea Association has more about OSA.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Thoracic Society, news release, May 7, 2009

Last Updated: May 08, 2009

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