ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Winter Is Tough on Feet
CANCER
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
Six Healthy-Sounding Foods That Really Aren't
Just Say No to Nuts During Pregnancy
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Hybrid Cars Pose Risk to Blind, Visually Impaired
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Swine Flu May Pose Problems for Pregnant Women
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Countdown to Hair Loss
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Add your Article

Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down

Regular moderate-intensity exercise during pregnancy reduces an infant's birth weight, which may lower the child's risk of obesity later in life, researchers say.

In a new study, 84 first-time pregnant women were randomly assigned to exercise or control groups, with those in the exercise group participating in a weekly maximum of five 40-minute sessions on a stationary cycle. They did this program until at least 36 weeks into their pregnancy.

Babies born to mothers in the exercise group were an average of 143 grams lighter than infants born to mothers in the control group, and also had a lower body-mass index (a measurement that takes into account height and weight), the researchers found.

The exercise training had no effect on the mothers' body weight or body-mass index during late pregnancy, and had no effect on insulin resistance from the start of the study to late gestation, according to the report published online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Our findings show that regular aerobic exercise alters the maternal environment in some way that has an impact on nutrient stimulation of fetal growth, resulting in a reduction in offspring birth weight," study co-author Dr. Paul Hofman, of the University of Auckland in New Zealand, said in an Endocrine Society news release. "Given that large birth size is associated with an increased risk of obesity, a modest reduction in birth weight may have long-term health benefits for offspring by lowering this risk in later life."

Hofman added that the "physiological response to pregnancy appears to supersede the chronic improvements in insulin sensitivity previously described in response to exercise training in non-pregnant individuals. This may be an important finding for athletes who want to continue regular training during their pregnancy as it suggests that training will not have a major adverse impact on insulin resistance."

SOURCES: The Endocrine Society, news release, April 5, 2010 Published on: April 05, 2010