ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Know Your Asthma Triggers
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Most Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Lack Vitamin D
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
CAREGIVING
Hispanic Children More Likely to Have Hearing Loss
Caregiving May Lengthen Life
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Updated
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
6 Million U.S. Kids Lack Enough Vitamin D
Asparagus May Ease Hangover
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Clear Skies Have Become Less So Over Time, Data Show
EYE CARE, VISION
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Internet Program Helps Problem Drinkers
Hidden Salt in Diet Haunts Many With Heart Failure
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down

Regular moderate-intensity exercise during pregnancy reduces an infant's birth weight, which may lower the child's risk of obesity later in life, researchers say.

In a new study, 84 first-time pregnant women were randomly assigned to exercise or control groups, with those in the exercise group participating in a weekly maximum of five 40-minute sessions on a stationary cycle. They did this program until at least 36 weeks into their pregnancy.

Babies born to mothers in the exercise group were an average of 143 grams lighter than infants born to mothers in the control group, and also had a lower body-mass index (a measurement that takes into account height and weight), the researchers found.

The exercise training had no effect on the mothers' body weight or body-mass index during late pregnancy, and had no effect on insulin resistance from the start of the study to late gestation, according to the report published online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Our findings show that regular aerobic exercise alters the maternal environment in some way that has an impact on nutrient stimulation of fetal growth, resulting in a reduction in offspring birth weight," study co-author Dr. Paul Hofman, of the University of Auckland in New Zealand, said in an Endocrine Society news release. "Given that large birth size is associated with an increased risk of obesity, a modest reduction in birth weight may have long-term health benefits for offspring by lowering this risk in later life."

Hofman added that the "physiological response to pregnancy appears to supersede the chronic improvements in insulin sensitivity previously described in response to exercise training in non-pregnant individuals. This may be an important finding for athletes who want to continue regular training during their pregnancy as it suggests that training will not have a major adverse impact on insulin resistance."

SOURCES: The Endocrine Society, news release, April 5, 2010 Published on: April 05, 2010