ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
New Clues to How Fish Oils Help Arthritis Patients
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
CANCER
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
CAREGIVING
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
Organ Donation Policies Vary Among Children's Hospitals
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating your way to Good Health
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Skin Woes Take Toll on U.S. Combat Troops
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
FDA Mandates New Warnings for Botox
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Sleep and Do Better
Autumn Chores Often Hazardous
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Breast-Fed Baby May Mean Better Behaved Child
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Add your Article

Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down

Regular moderate-intensity exercise during pregnancy reduces an infant's birth weight, which may lower the child's risk of obesity later in life, researchers say.

In a new study, 84 first-time pregnant women were randomly assigned to exercise or control groups, with those in the exercise group participating in a weekly maximum of five 40-minute sessions on a stationary cycle. They did this program until at least 36 weeks into their pregnancy.

Babies born to mothers in the exercise group were an average of 143 grams lighter than infants born to mothers in the control group, and also had a lower body-mass index (a measurement that takes into account height and weight), the researchers found.

The exercise training had no effect on the mothers' body weight or body-mass index during late pregnancy, and had no effect on insulin resistance from the start of the study to late gestation, according to the report published online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Our findings show that regular aerobic exercise alters the maternal environment in some way that has an impact on nutrient stimulation of fetal growth, resulting in a reduction in offspring birth weight," study co-author Dr. Paul Hofman, of the University of Auckland in New Zealand, said in an Endocrine Society news release. "Given that large birth size is associated with an increased risk of obesity, a modest reduction in birth weight may have long-term health benefits for offspring by lowering this risk in later life."

Hofman added that the "physiological response to pregnancy appears to supersede the chronic improvements in insulin sensitivity previously described in response to exercise training in non-pregnant individuals. This may be an important finding for athletes who want to continue regular training during their pregnancy as it suggests that training will not have a major adverse impact on insulin resistance."

SOURCES: The Endocrine Society, news release, April 5, 2010 Published on: April 05, 2010