ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
CANCER
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
CAREGIVING
MRSA Infections Spreading to Kids in Community
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
DIET, NUTRITION
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Vitamin B12 Key to Aging Brain
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Showerheads Harbor a Bounty of Germs
Accumulated Lead May Affect Older Women's Brains
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
GENERAL HEALTH
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Countdown to Hair Loss
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Heal Your LifeŽ Tips for Living Well
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Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down

Regular moderate-intensity exercise during pregnancy reduces an infant's birth weight, which may lower the child's risk of obesity later in life, researchers say.

In a new study, 84 first-time pregnant women were randomly assigned to exercise or control groups, with those in the exercise group participating in a weekly maximum of five 40-minute sessions on a stationary cycle. They did this program until at least 36 weeks into their pregnancy.

Babies born to mothers in the exercise group were an average of 143 grams lighter than infants born to mothers in the control group, and also had a lower body-mass index (a measurement that takes into account height and weight), the researchers found.

The exercise training had no effect on the mothers' body weight or body-mass index during late pregnancy, and had no effect on insulin resistance from the start of the study to late gestation, according to the report published online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Our findings show that regular aerobic exercise alters the maternal environment in some way that has an impact on nutrient stimulation of fetal growth, resulting in a reduction in offspring birth weight," study co-author Dr. Paul Hofman, of the University of Auckland in New Zealand, said in an Endocrine Society news release. "Given that large birth size is associated with an increased risk of obesity, a modest reduction in birth weight may have long-term health benefits for offspring by lowering this risk in later life."

Hofman added that the "physiological response to pregnancy appears to supersede the chronic improvements in insulin sensitivity previously described in response to exercise training in non-pregnant individuals. This may be an important finding for athletes who want to continue regular training during their pregnancy as it suggests that training will not have a major adverse impact on insulin resistance."

SOURCES: The Endocrine Society, news release, April 5, 2010 Published on: April 05, 2010