ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Osteoporosis May Raise Risk for Vertigo
Put Your Best Foot Forward Next Year
CANCER
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Babies Born in High Pollen Months at Wheezing Risk
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Smog Tougher on the Obese
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
DIET, NUTRITION
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
EYE CARE, VISION
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Protein Might One Day Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Marathoners Go the Distance on Heart Health
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
When It Comes to Lifting, the Pros Have Your Back
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Sun, Smoke, Extra Weight Add Years to Skin
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Add your Article

Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down

Regular moderate-intensity exercise during pregnancy reduces an infant's birth weight, which may lower the child's risk of obesity later in life, researchers say.

In a new study, 84 first-time pregnant women were randomly assigned to exercise or control groups, with those in the exercise group participating in a weekly maximum of five 40-minute sessions on a stationary cycle. They did this program until at least 36 weeks into their pregnancy.

Babies born to mothers in the exercise group were an average of 143 grams lighter than infants born to mothers in the control group, and also had a lower body-mass index (a measurement that takes into account height and weight), the researchers found.

The exercise training had no effect on the mothers' body weight or body-mass index during late pregnancy, and had no effect on insulin resistance from the start of the study to late gestation, according to the report published online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Our findings show that regular aerobic exercise alters the maternal environment in some way that has an impact on nutrient stimulation of fetal growth, resulting in a reduction in offspring birth weight," study co-author Dr. Paul Hofman, of the University of Auckland in New Zealand, said in an Endocrine Society news release. "Given that large birth size is associated with an increased risk of obesity, a modest reduction in birth weight may have long-term health benefits for offspring by lowering this risk in later life."

Hofman added that the "physiological response to pregnancy appears to supersede the chronic improvements in insulin sensitivity previously described in response to exercise training in non-pregnant individuals. This may be an important finding for athletes who want to continue regular training during their pregnancy as it suggests that training will not have a major adverse impact on insulin resistance."

SOURCES: The Endocrine Society, news release, April 5, 2010 Published on: April 05, 2010