ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Acupuncture Eases Breast Cancer Treatment Side Effects
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Using a Balloon to Repair a Broken Back
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Eating Vegan or Raw-Vegan at Regular Restaurants
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Gas Stove Emissions Boost Asthma in Inner-City Kids
Gene Explains How High-Fructose Diets Lead to Insulin Resistance
Smog Tougher on the Obese
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids Who Spend More Time Outdoors Have Better Vision
Music Can Help Restore Stroke Patients' Sight
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
Will the Wii Keep You Fit?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
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Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility

THURSDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who were overweight or obese earlier in life are at increased risk for physical disabilities, even if they've shed the excess weight they had when they were younger, says a new U.S. study.

"In both men and women, being overweight or obese put them at greater risk of developing mobility limitations in old age, and the longer they had been overweight or obese, the greater the risk," lead investigator Denise Houston, an expert on aging and nutrition and an assistant professor of gerontology at the School of Medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, said in a center news release.

"We also found that, if you were of normal weight in old age but had previously been overweight or obese, you were at greater risk for mobility limitations," she added.

Houston noted that weight loss later in life is usually caused by an underlying chronic condition.

The study included 2,845 participants who were an average of 74 years old when they were enrolled. They had no mobility problems at the start of the study. During seven years of follow-up, women who were overweight or obese (body mass index of 25 or greater) from their mid-20s to their 70s were nearly three times more likely to develop mobility problems than women who were normal weight throughout their lives. Overweight or obese men were 1.6 times more likely to develop mobility problems.

The researchers also found that women who were obese (BMI of 30 or greater) at age 50, but not in their 70s, were 2.7 times more likely to develop mobility limitations than women who weren't obese throughout their lives. Men with a similar weight history were 1.8 times more likely to develop mobility problems.

The study is in the April 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Excess weight can put stress on joints, make exercise difficult, and lead to chronic conditions such as diabetes, arthritis and heart disease -- all of which are directly related to the development of mobility problems, Houston said.

More information

The AGS Foundation for Health in Aging has more about walking problems in seniors.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, news release, April 7, 2009

Last Updated: April 09, 2009

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