ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Vitamin C Shows Promise as Cancer Treatment
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
B Vitamins Might Lower Stroke Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Disinfectants Can Boost Bacteria's Resistance to Treatment
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Poor Night Vision May Predict Age-Related Eye Disease
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Magnetic Pulses to Brain Improve Lazy Eye in Adults
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Have Fun But Put Play It Safe on the 4th
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
Laughter Can Stimulate a Dull Appetite
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
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Extra Pounds in Mid-Life Affect Later Mobility

THURSDAY, April 9 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who were overweight or obese earlier in life are at increased risk for physical disabilities, even if they've shed the excess weight they had when they were younger, says a new U.S. study.

"In both men and women, being overweight or obese put them at greater risk of developing mobility limitations in old age, and the longer they had been overweight or obese, the greater the risk," lead investigator Denise Houston, an expert on aging and nutrition and an assistant professor of gerontology at the School of Medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, said in a center news release.

"We also found that, if you were of normal weight in old age but had previously been overweight or obese, you were at greater risk for mobility limitations," she added.

Houston noted that weight loss later in life is usually caused by an underlying chronic condition.

The study included 2,845 participants who were an average of 74 years old when they were enrolled. They had no mobility problems at the start of the study. During seven years of follow-up, women who were overweight or obese (body mass index of 25 or greater) from their mid-20s to their 70s were nearly three times more likely to develop mobility problems than women who were normal weight throughout their lives. Overweight or obese men were 1.6 times more likely to develop mobility problems.

The researchers also found that women who were obese (BMI of 30 or greater) at age 50, but not in their 70s, were 2.7 times more likely to develop mobility limitations than women who weren't obese throughout their lives. Men with a similar weight history were 1.8 times more likely to develop mobility problems.

The study is in the April 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Excess weight can put stress on joints, make exercise difficult, and lead to chronic conditions such as diabetes, arthritis and heart disease -- all of which are directly related to the development of mobility problems, Houston said.

More information

The AGS Foundation for Health in Aging has more about walking problems in seniors.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, news release, April 7, 2009

Last Updated: April 09, 2009

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