ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
CANCER
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Marinades Help Keep Grilled Meat Safe
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
Licorice May Block Absorption of Organ Transplant Drug
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Staying Slim Is Good for the Environment
Lead Exposure in Childhood Linked to Criminal Behavior Later
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fructose Boosts Blood Pressure, Studies Find
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Time to Remind Teens About Sun Protection
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
The Unmedicated Mind
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Add your Article

Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status

FRIDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with inconsistent health-care coverage, or no health care coverage, are less likely to get regular eye care, even if they have vision problems, according to a new study.

The finding stems from a review of data on almost 290,000 adults who took part in the National Health Interview Survey from 1997 through 2005.

Respondents who said they sought eye care in the previous year included about 58 percent of those with severe visual impairment, 50 percent of those with some visual impairment and 34 percent of those with no visual impairment. Among people without health insurance, eye care visits were reported by about 36 percent of those with severe vision impairment, 24 percent who had some impairment and 14 percent with no visual impairment.

The lowest rates of eye care visits were reported by people without health insurance for a year or more. In this group, eye care visits were reported by 11 percent of those with no visual impairment, 20 percent who had some impairment and 34 percent with severe vision impairment.

"Interventions designed to increase eye care utilization rates in select socio-demographic subgroups are needed," wrote David J. Lee, of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and his colleagues. "Overall utilization rates may also be enhanced if progress is made toward dramatically increasing the number of Americans with health insurance."

The study was published in the March issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

The researchers "assert that providing universal vision care coverage would insure that financial resources are no longer a barrier for those seeking access to a vision care provider," Steven M. Kymes and Kevin D. Frick, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, wrote in an accompanying editorial. "However, we must also consider whether this would indeed be the most effective method to achieve the social goal of increased use of vision care services."

"Lee and his colleagues have made an important contribution to this growing literature by examining barriers to vision care," the editorial said. "However, the principles of scientific inquiry should not be shortchanged simply because we are debating a policy question rather than a biochemical one. The vision care community has an obligation to fully consider alternative solutions and their consequences in seeking ways to remove barriers to vision care."

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about financial aid for eye care.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 9, 2009

Last Updated: March 13, 2009

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