ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
CANCER
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
U.S. Reported 25,000 Cases of HPV-Related Cancers Annually
Tanning Beds Shown To Raise Cancer Risk, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Depression, PTSD Common Among Lung Transplant Patient Caregivers
Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
TV Food Ads Promote Bad Diets
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
FITNESS
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
The Brain Comes Alive With the Sounds of Music
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Coconut Oil May Help Fight Childhood Pneumonia
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
SENIORS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
Add your Article

Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status

FRIDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with inconsistent health-care coverage, or no health care coverage, are less likely to get regular eye care, even if they have vision problems, according to a new study.

The finding stems from a review of data on almost 290,000 adults who took part in the National Health Interview Survey from 1997 through 2005.

Respondents who said they sought eye care in the previous year included about 58 percent of those with severe visual impairment, 50 percent of those with some visual impairment and 34 percent of those with no visual impairment. Among people without health insurance, eye care visits were reported by about 36 percent of those with severe vision impairment, 24 percent who had some impairment and 14 percent with no visual impairment.

The lowest rates of eye care visits were reported by people without health insurance for a year or more. In this group, eye care visits were reported by 11 percent of those with no visual impairment, 20 percent who had some impairment and 34 percent with severe vision impairment.

"Interventions designed to increase eye care utilization rates in select socio-demographic subgroups are needed," wrote David J. Lee, of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and his colleagues. "Overall utilization rates may also be enhanced if progress is made toward dramatically increasing the number of Americans with health insurance."

The study was published in the March issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

The researchers "assert that providing universal vision care coverage would insure that financial resources are no longer a barrier for those seeking access to a vision care provider," Steven M. Kymes and Kevin D. Frick, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, wrote in an accompanying editorial. "However, we must also consider whether this would indeed be the most effective method to achieve the social goal of increased use of vision care services."

"Lee and his colleagues have made an important contribution to this growing literature by examining barriers to vision care," the editorial said. "However, the principles of scientific inquiry should not be shortchanged simply because we are debating a policy question rather than a biochemical one. The vision care community has an obligation to fully consider alternative solutions and their consequences in seeking ways to remove barriers to vision care."

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about financial aid for eye care.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 9, 2009

Last Updated: March 13, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com