ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
The Zen Way to Pain Relief
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Acupuncture Eases Side Effects of Head, Neck Cancer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Study Examines How Rheumatoid Arthritis Destroys Bone
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Night Shift Work Hard on the Heart
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Dental Implants Need More Work Than Root Canals
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
DIABETES
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Spices, Herbs Boost Health for Diabetics
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
Most Fast-Food French Fries Cooked in Unhealthiest Oil
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FITNESS
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
MENTAL HEALTH
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Add your Article

Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status

FRIDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with inconsistent health-care coverage, or no health care coverage, are less likely to get regular eye care, even if they have vision problems, according to a new study.

The finding stems from a review of data on almost 290,000 adults who took part in the National Health Interview Survey from 1997 through 2005.

Respondents who said they sought eye care in the previous year included about 58 percent of those with severe visual impairment, 50 percent of those with some visual impairment and 34 percent of those with no visual impairment. Among people without health insurance, eye care visits were reported by about 36 percent of those with severe vision impairment, 24 percent who had some impairment and 14 percent with no visual impairment.

The lowest rates of eye care visits were reported by people without health insurance for a year or more. In this group, eye care visits were reported by 11 percent of those with no visual impairment, 20 percent who had some impairment and 34 percent with severe vision impairment.

"Interventions designed to increase eye care utilization rates in select socio-demographic subgroups are needed," wrote David J. Lee, of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and his colleagues. "Overall utilization rates may also be enhanced if progress is made toward dramatically increasing the number of Americans with health insurance."

The study was published in the March issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

The researchers "assert that providing universal vision care coverage would insure that financial resources are no longer a barrier for those seeking access to a vision care provider," Steven M. Kymes and Kevin D. Frick, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, wrote in an accompanying editorial. "However, we must also consider whether this would indeed be the most effective method to achieve the social goal of increased use of vision care services."

"Lee and his colleagues have made an important contribution to this growing literature by examining barriers to vision care," the editorial said. "However, the principles of scientific inquiry should not be shortchanged simply because we are debating a policy question rather than a biochemical one. The vision care community has an obligation to fully consider alternative solutions and their consequences in seeking ways to remove barriers to vision care."

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about financial aid for eye care.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, March 9, 2009

Last Updated: March 13, 2009

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