ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
New Insights Show Ginseng Fights Inflammation
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Human Ancestors Put Best Foot Forward 1.5M Years Ago
CANCER
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
CAREGIVING
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Eating Free Range
The High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) Debate
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
EYE CARE, VISION
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
FITNESS
Football Can Shrink Players
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Proven Strategies for Avoiding Colds and the Flu
Be Healthy, Spend Less
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
School Meals Need to Get Healthier
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
SENIORS
Rapid Weight Loss in Seniors Signals Higher Dementia Risk
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun

SUNDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Don't overlook your eyes when you're thinking about ultraviolet (UV) protection as the weather heats up, experts say.

Overexposure to the sun's UV rays has been linked to a number of eye problems, such as age-related cataracts, pterygium, photokeratitis and corneal degenerative changes, according to the American Optometric Association (AOA).

These conditions can cause blurred vision, irritation, redness, tearing, temporary vision loss and, in some cases, blindness.

"Just as skin is 'burned' by UV radiation, the eye can also suffer damage. The lesson -- especially for young people -- is that eyes need protection, too. Protection can be achieved by simple, safe and inexpensive methods such as wearing a brimmed hat and using eyewear that properly absorbs UV radiation," Gregory Good, a member of AOA's commission on ophthalmic standards, said in a prepared statement.

Children and teens are particularly susceptible to sun-related eye damage, because they typically spend more time outdoors than adults, and the lenses of their eyes are more transparent than those of adults, which means that more harmful light can reach the retina.

But it appears many people still don't fully understand the danger the UV rays pose to eyes.

A 2007 AOA survey found that 40 percent of Americans don't think UV protection is an important factor to consider when buying sunglasses. The survey also found that 61 percent of Americans buy sunglasses for their children, but 23 percent don't check if the lenses provide protection against UV rays.

The AOA offers the following advice about sunglasses:

* Wear protective eyewear any time your eyes are exposed to UV radiation, even on cloudy days and during the winter.
* Purchase quality sunglasses that offer good UV protection. They should block out 99 percent of UV-A and UV-B radiation and screen out 75 percent to 90 percent of visible light.
* Make sure sunglass lenses are perfectly matched in color and free of distortions or imperfections.
* Buy gray-colored lenses. They reduce light-intensity without altering the color of objects, providing the most natural color vision.
* Make sure children and teens wear sunglasses. They typically spend more time in the sun than adults.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about sun exposure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Optometric Association, news release, May 2008

Last Updated: May 25, 2008

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