ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Naprapathy: A Hands-On Approach to Pain Management
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Barefoot Lifestyle Has Its Dangers
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
CANCER
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
CAREGIVING
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
DIET, NUTRITION
Keep Stress Off the Holiday Meal Menu, Expert Advises
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Hurricane Threats: Time to Batten Down the Hatches
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
EYE CARE, VISION
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
FITNESS
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Occupational Therapy Plus Exercise Benefits Osteoarthritis
Simple Steps Get Walkers Moving
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
What you need to know about swine flu.
The Brain Comes Alive With the Sounds of Music
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Exercise Eases Obesity and Anger in Kids
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
MEN'S HEALTH
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Add your Article

Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun

SUNDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Don't overlook your eyes when you're thinking about ultraviolet (UV) protection as the weather heats up, experts say.

Overexposure to the sun's UV rays has been linked to a number of eye problems, such as age-related cataracts, pterygium, photokeratitis and corneal degenerative changes, according to the American Optometric Association (AOA).

These conditions can cause blurred vision, irritation, redness, tearing, temporary vision loss and, in some cases, blindness.

"Just as skin is 'burned' by UV radiation, the eye can also suffer damage. The lesson -- especially for young people -- is that eyes need protection, too. Protection can be achieved by simple, safe and inexpensive methods such as wearing a brimmed hat and using eyewear that properly absorbs UV radiation," Gregory Good, a member of AOA's commission on ophthalmic standards, said in a prepared statement.

Children and teens are particularly susceptible to sun-related eye damage, because they typically spend more time outdoors than adults, and the lenses of their eyes are more transparent than those of adults, which means that more harmful light can reach the retina.

But it appears many people still don't fully understand the danger the UV rays pose to eyes.

A 2007 AOA survey found that 40 percent of Americans don't think UV protection is an important factor to consider when buying sunglasses. The survey also found that 61 percent of Americans buy sunglasses for their children, but 23 percent don't check if the lenses provide protection against UV rays.

The AOA offers the following advice about sunglasses:

* Wear protective eyewear any time your eyes are exposed to UV radiation, even on cloudy days and during the winter.
* Purchase quality sunglasses that offer good UV protection. They should block out 99 percent of UV-A and UV-B radiation and screen out 75 percent to 90 percent of visible light.
* Make sure sunglass lenses are perfectly matched in color and free of distortions or imperfections.
* Buy gray-colored lenses. They reduce light-intensity without altering the color of objects, providing the most natural color vision.
* Make sure children and teens wear sunglasses. They typically spend more time in the sun than adults.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about sun exposure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Optometric Association, news release, May 2008

Last Updated: May 25, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com