ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
U.S. Spends Billions On Alternative Medicine
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Omega-3 Fatty Acid May Help 'Preemie' Girls' Brains
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Flu Strikes a Milder Blow This Season
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Eating More Soy May Be Good For Your Lung Function
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
Radiation Exposure Linked to Aggressive Thyroid Cancers
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Man's Best Friend Helps Mend Broken Hearts
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise, Weight Control May Keep Fibromyalgia at Bay
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Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun

SUNDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Don't overlook your eyes when you're thinking about ultraviolet (UV) protection as the weather heats up, experts say.

Overexposure to the sun's UV rays has been linked to a number of eye problems, such as age-related cataracts, pterygium, photokeratitis and corneal degenerative changes, according to the American Optometric Association (AOA).

These conditions can cause blurred vision, irritation, redness, tearing, temporary vision loss and, in some cases, blindness.

"Just as skin is 'burned' by UV radiation, the eye can also suffer damage. The lesson -- especially for young people -- is that eyes need protection, too. Protection can be achieved by simple, safe and inexpensive methods such as wearing a brimmed hat and using eyewear that properly absorbs UV radiation," Gregory Good, a member of AOA's commission on ophthalmic standards, said in a prepared statement.

Children and teens are particularly susceptible to sun-related eye damage, because they typically spend more time outdoors than adults, and the lenses of their eyes are more transparent than those of adults, which means that more harmful light can reach the retina.

But it appears many people still don't fully understand the danger the UV rays pose to eyes.

A 2007 AOA survey found that 40 percent of Americans don't think UV protection is an important factor to consider when buying sunglasses. The survey also found that 61 percent of Americans buy sunglasses for their children, but 23 percent don't check if the lenses provide protection against UV rays.

The AOA offers the following advice about sunglasses:

* Wear protective eyewear any time your eyes are exposed to UV radiation, even on cloudy days and during the winter.
* Purchase quality sunglasses that offer good UV protection. They should block out 99 percent of UV-A and UV-B radiation and screen out 75 percent to 90 percent of visible light.
* Make sure sunglass lenses are perfectly matched in color and free of distortions or imperfections.
* Buy gray-colored lenses. They reduce light-intensity without altering the color of objects, providing the most natural color vision.
* Make sure children and teens wear sunglasses. They typically spend more time in the sun than adults.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about sun exposure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: American Optometric Association, news release, May 2008

Last Updated: May 25, 2008

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