ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Family History Key Player in Brain Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Exercise During Pregnancy May Help Baby
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Support Network May Play Role in Benefits of Drinking
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Drug May Not Help Diabetes-Related Eye Damage
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Pesticides on Produce Tied to ADHD in Children
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
Air Pollution Exposure May Slow Fetal Growth
Home Renovations by Affluent Families Can Unleash Lead Threat
EYE CARE, VISION
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
Eye Problems, Hearing Loss May Be Linked
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Super Bowl Loss Can 'Kill' Some Fans
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Biomarkers May Help Measure Rate of Decline in Dementia
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Brain Scans Show How Humans 'Hear' Emotion
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
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Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men

WEDNESDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Men who consume fatty fish and marine omega-3 fatty acids appear to have a reduced risk of heart failure, a new study has found.

Between 1998 and 2004, U.S. and Swedish researchers followed nearly 40,000 Swedish men, ages 45 to 79, recorded details of their diets and tracking their health outcomes. During that time, 597 men with no history of heart disease or diabetes developed heart failure, and 34 of them died from the disorder.

Men who ate fatty fish -- such as salmon, mackerel, herring, whitefish and char -- once a week were 12 percent less likely to develop heart failure than men who never ate fatty fish. The study also found that men who consumed a moderate amount (about 0.3 grams a day) of omega-3 fatty acids -- found in cod liver oil and other fish oils -- were less likely to develop heart failure than those who consumed little or no omega-3 fatty acids.

The beneficial heart effect was seen only in men who ate about one serving of fatty fish a week and who had a moderate intake of marine omega-3 fatty acids. Men who consumed more fatty fish or omega-3 fatty acids did not gain more heart protection and, in fact, had the same level of risk as men who never ate fatty fish or omega-3 fatty acids, the study found.

This was an unexpected finding and may be due to chance, the researchers said.

"Alternatively, these may be men in poor health who ate more fish to try to improve their ill-health, and therefore the fatty fish and fatty acids appear to be risk factors for heart failure," the study's leader, Dr. Emily Levitan, a cardiology research fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School in Boston, said in a news release from the European Heart Journal, where the findings are published. "I suspect this is the most likely explanation, but we cannot be certain from our data."

More information

The Heart Rhythm Society outlines heart failure risk factors.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: European Heart Journal, news release, April 21, 2009

Last Updated: April 22, 2009

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