ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
For All Their Plusses, Pets Pose a Risk for Falls, Too
Studies Struggle to Gauge Glucosamine's Worth
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Are Hospital Mobile Phones Dialing Up Superbugs?
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Milk Destroys Antioxidant Benefits in Blueberries
5 Reasons why you could gain weight while dieting
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
U.S. Diet Needs Heart-Felt Overhaul
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
Impotence Drugs Don't Harm Vision: Study
FITNESS
Run for Your Life
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
MEN'S HEALTH
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
Psychotherapy Can Boost Happiness More Than Money
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
For a Healthier Retirement, Work a Little
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Add your Article

Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Only a small number of hospitals in the United States have comprehensive electronic health record systems currently in place, a new study finds.

The biggest obstacle to adopting such systems is the cost, which can run as high as $20 million to $100 million, plus the reluctance of doctors to change their ways, experts say.

"President Obama, members of Congress and other policymakers have been pushing the notion that we need to have electronic records in hospitals and doctor's offices to make our health-care system work better," said lead researcher Dr. Ashish K. Jha, an associate professor at the Harvard School of Public Health.

But few hospitals have adopted these systems, Jha noted. "Achieving the vision of having electronic health care records deployed widely across the health-care system, we have a very long way to go," he said.

The report is published in the March 25 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

For the study, researchers questioned 3,049 U.S. hospitals about their electronic health record systems. They found that only 1.5 percent of these centers had comprehensive systems. A comprehensive system was defined as hospital-wide clinical documentation of cases, test results, prescription and test ordering, plus support for decision-making that included treatment guidelines.

Almost 8 percent of hospitals have an electronic records system that includes physician and nursing notes, but these systems do not have decision support. Some 10.9 percent have a basic system that does not include physician and nursing notes, and can only be used in one area of the hospital. When looking at computerized prescribing, the researchers found that 17 percent of the hospitals had this capacity, the researchers found.

The staggering cost of these systems has been a deterrent: The researchers noted that many hospitals don't have the resources to pay for them and there is no way to recoup the investment. "Hospitals don't get any more money for implementing these systems," Jha noted.

The researchers did not include federal hospitals in their analysis, since the Veterans Affairs hospitals have already implemented comprehensive electronic health record systems.

Jha noted that the recently passed stimulus bill includes $19 billion for promoting electronic medical records. "I think that's a great start, but given how low adoption rates are, it's just a start. It will help some hospitals get over the hump, but for many institutions, if the government really wants to help create incentives it's going to have to put a lot more resources into this area," he said.

The federal government can also base payments on improved quality of care rather than quantity of care, Jha said. Contrary to common belief, electronic health care record systems may not save money. "The jury is still out on that -- it might. There is very convincing evidence that this technology is going to make care safer, it's going to make care better," he said.

Money is only one issue slowing down the adoption of these electronic systems. Physician resistance and the lack of universal standards are also reasons cited by hospitals for not instituting these systems, Jha said.

Getting all hospitals to adopt electronic medical record systems will not happen overnight, Jha reasoned. "Even in the best-case scenario, it's going to take five to 10 years," he said.

Dr. David Blumenthal, director of the Institute for Health Policy and a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital/Partners HealthCare System, Boston, said during an afternoon teleconference Tuesday that the government is trying to soften the financial blow of adopting systems.

"The Congress and the administration showed enormous foresight and commitment to the goal of increasing adoption rates through the provisions of the stimulus bill," Blumenthal said. "The Congress wants to see results for the American people in terms of health and health care, not just in terms of technology adoption."

Blumenthal served as an advisor to the Obama campaign; in mid-April Blumenthal takes up his new job in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.

But two other researchers believe there's a long way to go in lowering the cost of implementing electronic medical record systems while also making them more flexible.

Current electronic record systems are monolithic, and they either fit the practice well ort hey don't, said Dr. Isaac S. Kohane, a professor of pediatrics and medicine at Harvard Medical School, co-director of the school's Center for Biomedical Informatics, and co-author of an accompanying journal article. If the system doesn't fit, "you are engaged in a costly customization process," he said.

Kohane and his co-author Dr. Kenneth Mandl, an associate professor at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, contend that using a platform of modular programs that can be made available through the federal government would allow hospitals to pick and choose the applications that best suit them, much like people now select the options they want from Google, Facebook and other Web sites.

"What we have is an opportunity to take a rational approach to what the characteristics are of a national system that would allow a standardized method of substitutable applications to access a core set of data to drive improvements in health care," Mandl said.

In addition, these applications should be less expensive than current systems, Kohane said.

-Steven Reinberg

More information

For more information on electronic medical records, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.



SOURCES: Ashish K. Jha, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor, Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, Boston; Isaac S. Kohane, M.D., Ph.D., professor, pediatrics and medicine, Harvard Medical School, and co-director, HMS Center for Biomedical Informatics, Boston; Kenneth Mandl, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Boston; March 24, 2009, teleconference with: David Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.P., director, Institute for Health Policy and physician, The Massachusetts General Hospital/Partners HealthCare System, Boston; March 25, 2009, New England Journal of Medicine, online

Last Updated: March 25, 2009

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