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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
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CANCER
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CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
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COSMETIC
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DENTAL, ORAL
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Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
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EYE CARE, VISION
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FITNESS
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Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
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GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
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Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
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GENERAL HEALTH
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FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds
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HEAD & NECK
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Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
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HEARING
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HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
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INFECTIOUS DISEASE
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INFERTILITY
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KID'S HEALTH
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MEN'S HEALTH
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MENTAL HEALTH
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Optimism May Boost Immune System
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PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
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Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
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More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
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Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Fish from five U.S. rivers were found to be tainted with traces of medications and common chemicals, according to a new study from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Baylor University.

The common antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl), an anticonvulsant and two types of antidepressants were among the seven types of pharmaceuticals found in the tissue and livers of fish from waterways in or near Chicago, Dallas, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Orlando, Fla. Each river is considered "effluent-dominated," because they receive large amounts of wastewater discharge from nearby sewage treatment plants.

While federal standards exist for treated wastewater, they do not address pharmaceuticals or most personal care products, and little is known about the effects they have on the environment and wildlife. This study is part of a federal strategy to address the issue.

Previous research has concluded that behavior vital for fish survival, such as mating and fighting, can be affected if too much antidepressant residue collects in their systems.

While other studies have found pharmaceuticals and personal care products in wild river fish, this is the first time multiple compounds have been found in fish from several different locations, co-lead investigator Bryan Brooks, an associate professor of environmental sciences at Baylor, said in a news release issued by the Texas-based university.

The medications and chemicals found from among the 36 tested for were, aside from diphenhydramine:

* the cholesterol drug gemfibrozil (Lopid), which researchers say had never before been found in wild fish;
* diltiazem (Cardizem), a medication that helps control high blood pressure;
* carbamazepine (Tegretol), a drug used for epilepsy and bipolar disorder;
* norfluoxetine, an active ingredient in the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac);
* the antidepressant sertraline (Zoloft);
* galaxolide and tonalide, common odor-enhancing ingredients in soap and other hygiene products.

Galaxolide and tonalide were found in the highest concentrations in the fish tissue, while the others were more concentrated in the liver, which processes foreign substances that enter the body.

The study was presented Wednesday at the American Chemical Society annual meeting in Salt Lake City, while the results also are to be published in a special online edition of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

More information

The U.S. Geologic Survey has more about toxins in wastewater.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Baylor University, news release, March 25, 2009

Last Updated: March 26, 2009

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