ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
Insight on Herbals Eludes Doctors, Patients Alike
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Sea Worm Inspires Novel Bone Glue
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
CANCER
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
When the Caregiver Becomes the Patient
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Walk 100 Steps a Minute for 'Moderate' Exercise
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Fatty Acid in Olive Oil Wards Off Hunger
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Ozone Pollution Taking Toll on American Lives
What's Cookin'? It Could Be Air Pollution
EYE CARE, VISION
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
Too Much Sun, Too Few Antioxidants Spell Eye Trouble
FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
After Job Loss, People Report More Health Issues
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Trouble
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Health Tip: Back Pain in Children
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
Eating Fish, Breast-Feeding Boost Infant Development
MEN'S HEALTH
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimerís
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Tai Chi May Help Ward Off Knee Pain in Seniors
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
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Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Fish from five U.S. rivers were found to be tainted with traces of medications and common chemicals, according to a new study from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Baylor University.

The common antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl), an anticonvulsant and two types of antidepressants were among the seven types of pharmaceuticals found in the tissue and livers of fish from waterways in or near Chicago, Dallas, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Orlando, Fla. Each river is considered "effluent-dominated," because they receive large amounts of wastewater discharge from nearby sewage treatment plants.

While federal standards exist for treated wastewater, they do not address pharmaceuticals or most personal care products, and little is known about the effects they have on the environment and wildlife. This study is part of a federal strategy to address the issue.

Previous research has concluded that behavior vital for fish survival, such as mating and fighting, can be affected if too much antidepressant residue collects in their systems.

While other studies have found pharmaceuticals and personal care products in wild river fish, this is the first time multiple compounds have been found in fish from several different locations, co-lead investigator Bryan Brooks, an associate professor of environmental sciences at Baylor, said in a news release issued by the Texas-based university.

The medications and chemicals found from among the 36 tested for were, aside from diphenhydramine:

* the cholesterol drug gemfibrozil (Lopid), which researchers say had never before been found in wild fish;
* diltiazem (Cardizem), a medication that helps control high blood pressure;
* carbamazepine (Tegretol), a drug used for epilepsy and bipolar disorder;
* norfluoxetine, an active ingredient in the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac);
* the antidepressant sertraline (Zoloft);
* galaxolide and tonalide, common odor-enhancing ingredients in soap and other hygiene products.

Galaxolide and tonalide were found in the highest concentrations in the fish tissue, while the others were more concentrated in the liver, which processes foreign substances that enter the body.

The study was presented Wednesday at the American Chemical Society annual meeting in Salt Lake City, while the results also are to be published in a special online edition of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

More information

The U.S. Geologic Survey has more about toxins in wastewater.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Baylor University, news release, March 25, 2009

Last Updated: March 26, 2009

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