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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
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ANIMAL CARE
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BONES & JOINTS
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CANCER
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CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
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COSMETIC
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DENTAL, ORAL
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Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
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Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Americans Consuming More Sugary Beverages
DIET, NUTRITION
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To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
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Common Pesticide Tied to Development Delays in Kids
Climate Change Linked to Longer Pollen Seasons
EYE CARE, VISION
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Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
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FITNESS
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
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GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
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HEAD & NECK
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Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
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HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
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Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
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Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
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INFERTILITY
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KID'S HEALTH
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Too Many Infants Short on Vitamin D
MEN'S HEALTH
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MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
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Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
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Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
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Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Fish from five U.S. rivers were found to be tainted with traces of medications and common chemicals, according to a new study from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Baylor University.

The common antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl), an anticonvulsant and two types of antidepressants were among the seven types of pharmaceuticals found in the tissue and livers of fish from waterways in or near Chicago, Dallas, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Orlando, Fla. Each river is considered "effluent-dominated," because they receive large amounts of wastewater discharge from nearby sewage treatment plants.

While federal standards exist for treated wastewater, they do not address pharmaceuticals or most personal care products, and little is known about the effects they have on the environment and wildlife. This study is part of a federal strategy to address the issue.

Previous research has concluded that behavior vital for fish survival, such as mating and fighting, can be affected if too much antidepressant residue collects in their systems.

While other studies have found pharmaceuticals and personal care products in wild river fish, this is the first time multiple compounds have been found in fish from several different locations, co-lead investigator Bryan Brooks, an associate professor of environmental sciences at Baylor, said in a news release issued by the Texas-based university.

The medications and chemicals found from among the 36 tested for were, aside from diphenhydramine:

* the cholesterol drug gemfibrozil (Lopid), which researchers say had never before been found in wild fish;
* diltiazem (Cardizem), a medication that helps control high blood pressure;
* carbamazepine (Tegretol), a drug used for epilepsy and bipolar disorder;
* norfluoxetine, an active ingredient in the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac);
* the antidepressant sertraline (Zoloft);
* galaxolide and tonalide, common odor-enhancing ingredients in soap and other hygiene products.

Galaxolide and tonalide were found in the highest concentrations in the fish tissue, while the others were more concentrated in the liver, which processes foreign substances that enter the body.

The study was presented Wednesday at the American Chemical Society annual meeting in Salt Lake City, while the results also are to be published in a special online edition of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

More information

The U.S. Geologic Survey has more about toxins in wastewater.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Baylor University, news release, March 25, 2009

Last Updated: March 26, 2009

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