ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Massage Fosters Healing in Bereaved Relatives
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
B Cells Can Act Alone in Autoimmune Diseases
Many Americans Fall Short on Their Vitamin D
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Vitamin D May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
Breast Self-Exam Rates Go Up With Counseling
CAREGIVING
Reduce Suffering, Urge Heart Failure Patients and Caregivers
Rapid Infant Weight Gain Linked to Childhood Obesity
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
COSMETIC
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
EYE CARE, VISION
Time Teaches Brain to Recognize Objects
Vision Test for Young Children Called Unreliable
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
FITNESS
Barefoot Best for Running?
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
GENERAL HEALTH
Lack of Vitamin D Linked to High Blood Pressure
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Toxins May Form When Skin, Indoor Ozone Meet
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
The Unmedicated Mind
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Yoga's Benefits Outweigh Risks for Pregnant Women
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Add your Article

Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks

(HealthDay News) -- Eating fish twice a week may help reduce the risk of kidney disease in people with diabetes, according to a British study of more than 22,000 adults, including 517 with diabetes.

The participants' fish consumption was determined using dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. People with diabetes who ate less than one serving of fish per week were about four times more likely (18 percent) to have protein in their urine than those who ate at least two servings of fish per week (4 percent).

"Protein in the urine is one of the earliest signs of kidney disease," noted study co-author Dr. Amanda Adler, of the Medical Research Council epidemiology unit at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge.

The study was published in the November issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

Adler and her colleagues suggested the "unique nutrient composition of fish" may benefit kidney function by enhancing blood glucose control and improving plasma lipid profiles.

People who consume fish may have other lifestyle factors that reduce their risk of having protein in the urine (albuminuria), but the study design attempted to account for that possibility, Adler said.

"Diet is a relatively simple lifestyle change to make, and the benefits could be significant," Dr. Kerry Willis, senior vice president for scientific activities at the U.S. National Kidney Foundation, said in a foundation news release.

In addition to eating fish, other measures that help lower the risk of albuminuria include tight control of glucose, keeping blood pressure under control, quitting smoking, and following a diabetic diet as prescribed by a doctor, according to the kidney foundation.

More information

The U.S. National Kidney Foundation has more about diabetes and kidney disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. National Kidney Foundation, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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