ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Needling Away Your Headaches With Acupuncture
Regular Yoga May Improve Eating Habits
Higher Vitamin D Intake Could Cut Cancer Risk
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Fall Sports Peak Time for Lower Leg Damage
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
CANCER
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
CAREGIVING
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
Birthmark or Blood Vessel Problem?
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Health Tip: Are You Anemic?
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Poor Blood Sugar Control After Heart Surgery Impacts Outcomes
DIET, NUTRITION
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Smog Standards Need Tightening, Activists Say
Think You Are Lead-Free? Check Your Soil
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Unconscious Learning: In the Eye of the Beholder?
FITNESS
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Guard Kids' Eyes Against Long-Term Sun Damage
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Combo Treatment Eases Wheezing in Babies
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Friends, Not Grandkids, Key to Happy Retirement
Protein Deposits May Show Up Before Memory Problems Occur, Study Says
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Add your Article

Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks

(HealthDay News) -- Eating fish twice a week may help reduce the risk of kidney disease in people with diabetes, according to a British study of more than 22,000 adults, including 517 with diabetes.

The participants' fish consumption was determined using dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. People with diabetes who ate less than one serving of fish per week were about four times more likely (18 percent) to have protein in their urine than those who ate at least two servings of fish per week (4 percent).

"Protein in the urine is one of the earliest signs of kidney disease," noted study co-author Dr. Amanda Adler, of the Medical Research Council epidemiology unit at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge.

The study was published in the November issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

Adler and her colleagues suggested the "unique nutrient composition of fish" may benefit kidney function by enhancing blood glucose control and improving plasma lipid profiles.

People who consume fish may have other lifestyle factors that reduce their risk of having protein in the urine (albuminuria), but the study design attempted to account for that possibility, Adler said.

"Diet is a relatively simple lifestyle change to make, and the benefits could be significant," Dr. Kerry Willis, senior vice president for scientific activities at the U.S. National Kidney Foundation, said in a foundation news release.

In addition to eating fish, other measures that help lower the risk of albuminuria include tight control of glucose, keeping blood pressure under control, quitting smoking, and following a diabetic diet as prescribed by a doctor, according to the kidney foundation.

More information

The U.S. National Kidney Foundation has more about diabetes and kidney disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. National Kidney Foundation, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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