ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tequila Plant May Help Fight Bone Loss
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Gene Screen May Predict Colon Cancer's Return
Vitamin D Good for Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Most Women Struggle With Rising Health Care Costs
Older Caregivers Prone to Worse Sleep Patterns
With Age Comes Greater Risk of Hypothermia
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
DIET, NUTRITION
Teens Lose More Weight Using Healthy Strategies
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Pilots May Face Greater Cancer Risk
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
EYE CARE, VISION
Cases of Age-Related Farsightedness to Soar
Eye Test Could Spot Diabetes Vision Trouble Early
Drinking Green Tea May Protect Eyes
FITNESS
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Obese People Seem to Do Better With Heart Disease
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Working Intensely Early on May Help Autistic Kids
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
PAIN
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
SENIORS
Any Old Cane Won't Do
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
Add your Article

Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks

(HealthDay News) -- Eating fish twice a week may help reduce the risk of kidney disease in people with diabetes, according to a British study of more than 22,000 adults, including 517 with diabetes.

The participants' fish consumption was determined using dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. People with diabetes who ate less than one serving of fish per week were about four times more likely (18 percent) to have protein in their urine than those who ate at least two servings of fish per week (4 percent).

"Protein in the urine is one of the earliest signs of kidney disease," noted study co-author Dr. Amanda Adler, of the Medical Research Council epidemiology unit at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge.

The study was published in the November issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

Adler and her colleagues suggested the "unique nutrient composition of fish" may benefit kidney function by enhancing blood glucose control and improving plasma lipid profiles.

People who consume fish may have other lifestyle factors that reduce their risk of having protein in the urine (albuminuria), but the study design attempted to account for that possibility, Adler said.

"Diet is a relatively simple lifestyle change to make, and the benefits could be significant," Dr. Kerry Willis, senior vice president for scientific activities at the U.S. National Kidney Foundation, said in a foundation news release.

In addition to eating fish, other measures that help lower the risk of albuminuria include tight control of glucose, keeping blood pressure under control, quitting smoking, and following a diabetic diet as prescribed by a doctor, according to the kidney foundation.

More information

The U.S. National Kidney Foundation has more about diabetes and kidney disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. National Kidney Foundation, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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