ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Most Women With Osteoporosis Unaware of Raised Fracture Risk
CANCER
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Poor Women Seem to Be Skipping Breast Cancer Drugs
Yoga May Bring Calm to Breast Cancer Treatment
CAREGIVING
U.S. Mental Health Spending Rises, But Many Still Left Out
Distance No Bar to Kidney Transplants in Remote Areas
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Good Oral Hygiene May Protect Against Heart Infections
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
'Standard' Glucose Test May Be Wrong One for Obese Children
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Iced Teas Pose High Risk of Kidney Stones
Blueberry Drink Protects Mice From Obesity, Diabetes
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
EYE CARE, VISION
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
FITNESS
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Coffee Cuts Liver Scarring in Hepatitis C
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
The Brain Comes Alive With the Sounds of Music
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Vitamin B3 May Help Repair Brain After a Stroke
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Any Old Cane Won't Do
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Vitamin D Deficiency Puts 40% of U.S. Infants and Toddlers At Risk
Add your Article

Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks

(HealthDay News) -- Eating fish twice a week may help reduce the risk of kidney disease in people with diabetes, according to a British study of more than 22,000 adults, including 517 with diabetes.

The participants' fish consumption was determined using dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. People with diabetes who ate less than one serving of fish per week were about four times more likely (18 percent) to have protein in their urine than those who ate at least two servings of fish per week (4 percent).

"Protein in the urine is one of the earliest signs of kidney disease," noted study co-author Dr. Amanda Adler, of the Medical Research Council epidemiology unit at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge.

The study was published in the November issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

Adler and her colleagues suggested the "unique nutrient composition of fish" may benefit kidney function by enhancing blood glucose control and improving plasma lipid profiles.

People who consume fish may have other lifestyle factors that reduce their risk of having protein in the urine (albuminuria), but the study design attempted to account for that possibility, Adler said.

"Diet is a relatively simple lifestyle change to make, and the benefits could be significant," Dr. Kerry Willis, senior vice president for scientific activities at the U.S. National Kidney Foundation, said in a foundation news release.

In addition to eating fish, other measures that help lower the risk of albuminuria include tight control of glucose, keeping blood pressure under control, quitting smoking, and following a diabetic diet as prescribed by a doctor, according to the kidney foundation.

More information

The U.S. National Kidney Foundation has more about diabetes and kidney disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. National Kidney Foundation, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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