ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Acupuncture May Trigger Natural Painkiller
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
CANCER
Antioxidants Pose No Melanoma Threat
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Deadly as Ever
Caregivers Face Multiple Strains Tending Older Parents
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Eating Lots Of Vegetables, Olive Oil May Extend Life
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Low Vitamin A, C Intake Tied to Asthma Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Prenatal Exposure to Traffic Pollution May Lead to Asthma
Population-Based Strategy Urged to Cut U.S. Obesity Rate
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Antioxidant-Rich Diet May Protect Against Eye Disease
Americans Losing Sight of Eye Health
FITNESS
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Barefoot Best for Running?
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
What you need to know about swine flu.
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Heavy Alcohol Use Linked to Cancer
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Drinking Your Way to Health? Perhaps Not
Fondness for Fish Keeps Japanese Hearts Healthy
Omega-3, Some Omega-6 Fatty Acids Boost Cardiovascular Health
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
SENIORS
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Healthy Diet Could Cut Alzheimer's Disease Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks

(HealthDay News) -- Eating fish twice a week may help reduce the risk of kidney disease in people with diabetes, according to a British study of more than 22,000 adults, including 517 with diabetes.

The participants' fish consumption was determined using dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. People with diabetes who ate less than one serving of fish per week were about four times more likely (18 percent) to have protein in their urine than those who ate at least two servings of fish per week (4 percent).

"Protein in the urine is one of the earliest signs of kidney disease," noted study co-author Dr. Amanda Adler, of the Medical Research Council epidemiology unit at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge.

The study was published in the November issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

Adler and her colleagues suggested the "unique nutrient composition of fish" may benefit kidney function by enhancing blood glucose control and improving plasma lipid profiles.

People who consume fish may have other lifestyle factors that reduce their risk of having protein in the urine (albuminuria), but the study design attempted to account for that possibility, Adler said.

"Diet is a relatively simple lifestyle change to make, and the benefits could be significant," Dr. Kerry Willis, senior vice president for scientific activities at the U.S. National Kidney Foundation, said in a foundation news release.

In addition to eating fish, other measures that help lower the risk of albuminuria include tight control of glucose, keeping blood pressure under control, quitting smoking, and following a diabetic diet as prescribed by a doctor, according to the kidney foundation.

More information

The U.S. National Kidney Foundation has more about diabetes and kidney disease.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: U.S. National Kidney Foundation, news release, Nov. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Nov. 03, 2008

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