ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
CANCER
Scams and Shams That Prey on Cancer Patients
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Baby's Sleep Position May Not Affect Severity of Head Flattening
What Moms Learned May Be Passed to Offspring
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Anemia Rates Down for U.S. Women and Children
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Most Insured Adults Worry About Health Care Costs: Poll
DIABETES
Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
DIET, NUTRITION
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
Myrrh May Lower High Cholesterol
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
Vitamin D Deficit May Trigger MS Risk Gene
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
GENERAL HEALTH
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
Sleep and Do Better
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
3 Home Habits Help Youngsters Stay Slim
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
St. John's Wort Doesn't Work for ADHD
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Positive Brain Changes Seen After Body-Mind Meditation
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
15-Point Test Gauges Alzheimer's Risk
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
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For Older Walkers, Faster Is Better

(HealthDay News) -- Highlighting the importance of staying fit in old age, a French study has found that seniors who walk slowly are three times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than are fast walkers.

The researchers measured the walking speed of the participants -- 3,208 men and women, ages 65 to 85 -- and collected medical and demographic information on them at the start of the study. Follow-up exams were performed at regular intervals over the next five years.

After adjusting for a number of baseline characteristic, the researchers found that seniors with the slowest walking speed were 44 percent more likely to die than the fastest walkers. The slowest walkers also had a three-fold higher risk of cardiovascular death.

The increased risk of cardiovascular death was found in both women and men, in younger as well as older seniors and in those with low or usual physical activity levels.

There was no link between walking speed and risk of death from cancer.

"These findings show that assessment of motor performances in older people using simple measures such as walking speed can be performed easily and that the role of fitness in preserving life and function in older age is important," the researchers wrote.

The study was published online Nov. 10 in BMJ.