ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Know Your Asthma Triggers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
ANIMAL CARE
Safe Toys for Dogs
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Autumn Sees More Women With Bunion Problems
CANCER
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Well Water Might Raise Bladder Cancer Risk
To Quit Smoking, Try Logging On
CAREGIVING
Stressed Health Care Workers Battle 'Compassion Fatigue'
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
DIET, NUTRITION
Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Holiday Eating
Atkins Diet Tougher on Heart After Weight Loss
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Household Chemicals May Affect Cholesterol Levels
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
FITNESS
As Temperature Plummets, It's Still Safe to Exercise
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D Best Taken With Largest Meal of Day, Study Finds
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Heart Disease
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Research Shows Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
MEN'S HEALTH
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
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Former Inmates at Increased Risk for High Blood Pressure

TUESDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who are former prison inmates are at increased risk for high blood pressure and a related heart condition called left ventricular hypertrophy, a U.S. study finds.

The researchers also found that inmates have less access to regular medical care than the general population.

The study examined data on 4,350 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, who were aged 18 to 30 when they were enrolled in the study in 1985-86. The participants' heart health factors were assessed at two, five, seven, 10, 15 and 20 years after the start of the study. Of the more than 4,000 participants, 288 (7 percent) reported being in prison one year prior to or two years after enrollment.

The study found that former inmates were more likely to have high blood pressure as young adults than those who were never in prison (12 percent vs. 7 percent three to five years later) and were also more likely to have left ventricular hypertrophy (2 percent vs. 0.6 percent), which is a common consequence of high blood pressure.

"Former inmates were also more likely to lack treatment for their hypertension at the year seven examination (17 percent vs. 41 percent), and in each of the follow-up visits during the entire 20-year duration of the CARDIA study," wrote Dr. Emily A. Wang, of the San Francisco General Hospital and the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues.

Commonly cited factors such as drug and alcohol use, obesity and lower socioeconomic status may not entirely explain the association between prison time and increased risk of high blood pressure, the researchers said. They suggested other factors that may play a role, including increased hostility and stress, which may raise levels of hormones that contribute to high blood pressure.

The study was published in the April 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"For the more than 7 million people that pass through U.S. jails and prisons each year, incarceration may be an independent risk factor for the development of hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, both of which put such persons at higher risk for clinical cardiovascular disease," Wang and colleagues concluded. "Incarceration may be a cause for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but may also present an underused opportunity for intervention and improving health and access to health care."

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about high blood pressure.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: JAMA/Archives journals, news release, April 13, 2009

Last Updated: April 14, 2009

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