ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
CANCER
Get to Know the Pap Test
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Women Smokers Lose 14.5 Years Off Life Span
CAREGIVING
3 Steps Might Help Stop MRSA's Spread
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Obesity Boosts Gum Disease Risk
DIABETES
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Depression
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Ozone-Depleting Inhalers Being Phased Out
Smog Tougher on the Obese
EYE CARE, VISION
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
Brain Pressure More Likely to Cause Vision Loss in Men
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Exercise Cuts Lung Cancer Risk in Ex-Smokers by 45%
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
Pool Chemicals Raise Kids Allergy, Asthma Risk
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
MENTAL HEALTH
Using the Mind to Heal the Heart
Keeping a Healthy Holiday Balance
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
SENIORS
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
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Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page

SATURDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found a mathematical relationship between two common blood glucose measurements that can help diabetics better monitor their condition.

An international study, published online in the August issue of Diabetes Care, describes the ties discovered between the three-month average glucose reading and levels of the A1C test and converting it to estimated average glucose (eAG). Most home-monitoring systems used by diabetics measure eAG in one type of unit, while A1C, which doctors have used for more than 25 years as the major measure of glucose control, is in different units.

It is extremely helpful for health-care professionals and patients to be using the same language to discuss glucose goals, Dr. Robert J. Heine, a professor of diabetology in the Department of Endocrinology at the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, said in a prepared statement. Since patients sometimes find it difficult to understand the concept of glycated hemoglobin, it will be much easier to have all test results, both those from the lab and those the patient performs, in the same units.

The study, which examined 507 volunteers of various races and ethnicities with and without either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, confirms previous smaller studies.

Heine said the discovery will prove to be a valuable education tool. When health-care professionals set goals based on eAG units, then patients will know how close they are to reaching their goals every day when they test at home with self-monitoring, he said.

Most diabetics regularly use simple monitors that require pricking their fingers to obtain blood so they can check their blood glucose levels at home. The tests give blood glucose information only at that moment of the test.

A1C, by contrast, measures glucose control from the prior two to three months by reporting how much glucose has attached to a portion of the hemoglobin molecule in the blood. The American Diabetes Association recommends a goal of less than 7 percent for this test, which is also known as glycated hemoglobin testing.

"We developed an equation that can be interpreted accurately as an estimated average glucose level by comparing the measurement of A1C with the average glucose levels," study co-author Dr. Edward S. Horton, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a prepared statement. He was expected to present the study Tuesday at the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting, in San Francisco.

Horton cautioned that there are some limits to the study that will require further investigation. Some ethnic-racial groups, notably those of African and Asian descent, were under-represented; children and pregnant women were not studied, and patients with unstable glucose level or possible red blood cell disorders were also not included.

Educating diabetics and doctors about the relationship and how to take advantage of it, though, will soon begin by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and International Diabetes Federation. The ADA Web site, www.diabetes.org, is already letting doctors purchase an inexpensive hand-held calculator that will quickly convert A1C values to eAG.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more about diabetes.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, June 6, 2008

Last Updated: June 07, 2008

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