ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Many Cancer Patients Turn to Complementary Medicine
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
38% of U.S. Adults Use Alternative Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Obese Children More Likely to Suffer Lower Body Injuries
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Laughter May Lower Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Chemicals in Carpets, Non-Stick Pans Tied to Thyroid Disease
Is It Safe to Go in the Gulf Coast's Water?
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
EYE CARE, VISION
Blood Sugar Control Helps Diabetics Preserve Sight
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
FITNESS
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Living With Less TV, More Sweat Boosts Weight Loss
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Play Creatively as a Kid, Be a Healthier Adult
Want Sun Protection? Wear Red or Blue
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Coffee Is Generally Heart-Friendly
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
MENTAL HEALTH
Drink Away Dementia?
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Mediterranean Diet Plus Exercise Lowers Alzheimer's Risk
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Lifting Weights Can Ease Arm Swelling in Breast Cancer Survivors
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Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page

SATURDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found a mathematical relationship between two common blood glucose measurements that can help diabetics better monitor their condition.

An international study, published online in the August issue of Diabetes Care, describes the ties discovered between the three-month average glucose reading and levels of the A1C test and converting it to estimated average glucose (eAG). Most home-monitoring systems used by diabetics measure eAG in one type of unit, while A1C, which doctors have used for more than 25 years as the major measure of glucose control, is in different units.

It is extremely helpful for health-care professionals and patients to be using the same language to discuss glucose goals, Dr. Robert J. Heine, a professor of diabetology in the Department of Endocrinology at the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, said in a prepared statement. Since patients sometimes find it difficult to understand the concept of glycated hemoglobin, it will be much easier to have all test results, both those from the lab and those the patient performs, in the same units.

The study, which examined 507 volunteers of various races and ethnicities with and without either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, confirms previous smaller studies.

Heine said the discovery will prove to be a valuable education tool. When health-care professionals set goals based on eAG units, then patients will know how close they are to reaching their goals every day when they test at home with self-monitoring, he said.

Most diabetics regularly use simple monitors that require pricking their fingers to obtain blood so they can check their blood glucose levels at home. The tests give blood glucose information only at that moment of the test.

A1C, by contrast, measures glucose control from the prior two to three months by reporting how much glucose has attached to a portion of the hemoglobin molecule in the blood. The American Diabetes Association recommends a goal of less than 7 percent for this test, which is also known as glycated hemoglobin testing.

"We developed an equation that can be interpreted accurately as an estimated average glucose level by comparing the measurement of A1C with the average glucose levels," study co-author Dr. Edward S. Horton, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a prepared statement. He was expected to present the study Tuesday at the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting, in San Francisco.

Horton cautioned that there are some limits to the study that will require further investigation. Some ethnic-racial groups, notably those of African and Asian descent, were under-represented; children and pregnant women were not studied, and patients with unstable glucose level or possible red blood cell disorders were also not included.

Educating diabetics and doctors about the relationship and how to take advantage of it, though, will soon begin by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and International Diabetes Federation. The ADA Web site, www.diabetes.org, is already letting doctors purchase an inexpensive hand-held calculator that will quickly convert A1C values to eAG.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more about diabetes.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, June 6, 2008

Last Updated: June 07, 2008

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