ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
When Healing Becomes a Commodity
Supplement Hampers Thyroid Cancer Treatment
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tips to Ease an Aching Back
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
CANCER
Multiple Screening Strategy Boosts Cervical Cancer Detection
Mineral May Reduce High-Risk Bladder Disease
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
CAREGIVING
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Tiniest Babies Carry Biggest Costs
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Uncover Why Turmeric Helps You Heal
Trans Fat Labeling Gets Tricky
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
EYE CARE, VISION
Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
FITNESS
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
Daily Exercise at School Yields Rewards
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Health Gains From Lowered Smoking Rates in Jeopardy
Afternoon Nap Might Make You Smarter
Cocaine Spurs Long-Term Change in Brain Chemistry
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Cocoa in Chocolate May Be Good for the Heart
Whole Grains Lower Risk of Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Backpack Safety Should Be on Back-to-School Lists
Fussy Babys Could Be Out Of Your Control
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
The Dark Side of Vegetarianism
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
Love Hormone May Ease Discussion of Painful Topics
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
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Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page

SATURDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found a mathematical relationship between two common blood glucose measurements that can help diabetics better monitor their condition.

An international study, published online in the August issue of Diabetes Care, describes the ties discovered between the three-month average glucose reading and levels of the A1C test and converting it to estimated average glucose (eAG). Most home-monitoring systems used by diabetics measure eAG in one type of unit, while A1C, which doctors have used for more than 25 years as the major measure of glucose control, is in different units.

It is extremely helpful for health-care professionals and patients to be using the same language to discuss glucose goals, Dr. Robert J. Heine, a professor of diabetology in the Department of Endocrinology at the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, said in a prepared statement. Since patients sometimes find it difficult to understand the concept of glycated hemoglobin, it will be much easier to have all test results, both those from the lab and those the patient performs, in the same units.

The study, which examined 507 volunteers of various races and ethnicities with and without either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, confirms previous smaller studies.

Heine said the discovery will prove to be a valuable education tool. When health-care professionals set goals based on eAG units, then patients will know how close they are to reaching their goals every day when they test at home with self-monitoring, he said.

Most diabetics regularly use simple monitors that require pricking their fingers to obtain blood so they can check their blood glucose levels at home. The tests give blood glucose information only at that moment of the test.

A1C, by contrast, measures glucose control from the prior two to three months by reporting how much glucose has attached to a portion of the hemoglobin molecule in the blood. The American Diabetes Association recommends a goal of less than 7 percent for this test, which is also known as glycated hemoglobin testing.

"We developed an equation that can be interpreted accurately as an estimated average glucose level by comparing the measurement of A1C with the average glucose levels," study co-author Dr. Edward S. Horton, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a prepared statement. He was expected to present the study Tuesday at the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting, in San Francisco.

Horton cautioned that there are some limits to the study that will require further investigation. Some ethnic-racial groups, notably those of African and Asian descent, were under-represented; children and pregnant women were not studied, and patients with unstable glucose level or possible red blood cell disorders were also not included.

Educating diabetics and doctors about the relationship and how to take advantage of it, though, will soon begin by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and International Diabetes Federation. The ADA Web site, www.diabetes.org, is already letting doctors purchase an inexpensive hand-held calculator that will quickly convert A1C values to eAG.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more about diabetes.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, June 6, 2008

Last Updated: June 07, 2008

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