ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Traditional Chinese Therapy May Help Ease Eczema
Pain-Relieving Powers of Acupuncture Unclear
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Safe Toys for Dogs
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Genes May Help Drive Rotator Cuff Injury
Improved Hip Implants Can Last 20 Years
Stem Cells Might Treat Tough Fractures
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
Get to Know the Pap Test
CAREGIVING
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Study Links Osteoporosis Drugs to Jaw Trouble
DIABETES
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
DIET, NUTRITION
Quick Weight Loss May Be Best for Long-Term Success
Caffeine May Offer Some Skin Cancer Protection
Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Biggest Health Threat of 21st Century, Experts Say
Scorpion Anti-Venom Speeds Children's Recovery
Cleaning House May Be Risky for Women With Asthma
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Kids Think Glasses Make Others Look Smart, Honest
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
FITNESS
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Olde Time Medicine Therapy May Prevent Alcoholic Relapse
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
B-Vitamins Help Protect Against Stroke, Heart Disease
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
SENIORS
Older People at Greater Risk of Swine Flu Death
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Eating Well And Keeping Active As You Grow Old Will Help You Stay Sharp
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
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Formula Puts Doctor, Patient Glucose Readings on Same Page

SATURDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found a mathematical relationship between two common blood glucose measurements that can help diabetics better monitor their condition.

An international study, published online in the August issue of Diabetes Care, describes the ties discovered between the three-month average glucose reading and levels of the A1C test and converting it to estimated average glucose (eAG). Most home-monitoring systems used by diabetics measure eAG in one type of unit, while A1C, which doctors have used for more than 25 years as the major measure of glucose control, is in different units.

It is extremely helpful for health-care professionals and patients to be using the same language to discuss glucose goals, Dr. Robert J. Heine, a professor of diabetology in the Department of Endocrinology at the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, said in a prepared statement. Since patients sometimes find it difficult to understand the concept of glycated hemoglobin, it will be much easier to have all test results, both those from the lab and those the patient performs, in the same units.

The study, which examined 507 volunteers of various races and ethnicities with and without either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, confirms previous smaller studies.

Heine said the discovery will prove to be a valuable education tool. When health-care professionals set goals based on eAG units, then patients will know how close they are to reaching their goals every day when they test at home with self-monitoring, he said.

Most diabetics regularly use simple monitors that require pricking their fingers to obtain blood so they can check their blood glucose levels at home. The tests give blood glucose information only at that moment of the test.

A1C, by contrast, measures glucose control from the prior two to three months by reporting how much glucose has attached to a portion of the hemoglobin molecule in the blood. The American Diabetes Association recommends a goal of less than 7 percent for this test, which is also known as glycated hemoglobin testing.

"We developed an equation that can be interpreted accurately as an estimated average glucose level by comparing the measurement of A1C with the average glucose levels," study co-author Dr. Edward S. Horton, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a prepared statement. He was expected to present the study Tuesday at the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting, in San Francisco.

Horton cautioned that there are some limits to the study that will require further investigation. Some ethnic-racial groups, notably those of African and Asian descent, were under-represented; children and pregnant women were not studied, and patients with unstable glucose level or possible red blood cell disorders were also not included.

Educating diabetics and doctors about the relationship and how to take advantage of it, though, will soon begin by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and International Diabetes Federation. The ADA Web site, www.diabetes.org, is already letting doctors purchase an inexpensive hand-held calculator that will quickly convert A1C values to eAG.

More information

The American Diabetes Association has more about diabetes.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Diabetes Association, news release, June 6, 2008

Last Updated: June 07, 2008

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