ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Air Pollution May Raise Blood Pressure
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
Acupuncture May Help Restore Lost Sense of Smell
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Resistance Training Boosts Mobility in Knee Arthritis Patients
A Little Drink May Be Good for Your Bones
Heart Failure Raises Risk of Fractures
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
CAREGIVING
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Early Exercise Boosts Outcomes for ICU Patients
High Rate of Rehospitalizations Costing Billions
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
COSMETIC
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Health Tip: After Liposuction
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
DIABETES
Strict Blood Sugar Lowering Won't Ease Diabetes Heart Risk
Doctors Urged to Screen Diabetics for Sleep Apnea
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
DIET, NUTRITION
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
FDA Faulted for Stance on Chemical in Plastics
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Restaurant Sushi May Have More Mercury Than Store-Bought Fare
EYE CARE, VISION
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Nutrient-Rich Diet Lowers Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Exercise Helps Reduce Falls in Young and Old
Vigorous Treadmill Workout Curbs Appetite Hormones
Basketball Star Details His Struggle With Gout
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Scary Toxins Make Halloween Face Paints Questionable
Babies Who Eat Fish Lower Eczema Risk
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
MEN'S HEALTH
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
MENTAL HEALTH
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
Meaningful Conversations Boost Kids' Language Skills
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
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Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer

THURSDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- People with moles and other features that put them at higher risk of skin cancer may also have an increased chance of developing melanoma of the eye, a new study says.

Canadian researchers found links between skin moles, freckles, moles on the iris and risk of uveal melanoma -- cancer of the eye's iris, ciliary body or choroid. Among the findings were that people with atypical moles (ones that appear different in shape or color from common moles) had almost three times the risk of having uveal melanoma as did those without such moles.

The research, published in the March issue of Ophthalmology, might help clarify a long-unclear issue. Previous studies have been mixed about whether moles and freckles indicate a higher uveal melanoma rate.

"Our study points to an interaction of genetic susceptibility and an environmental insult in the form of UV exposure," Dr. Ezekiel Weis, of the University of Alberta's ophthalmology department and leader of the study, said in an American Academy of Ophthalmology news release. Weis's team believes the analysis they performed on previous studies adjusted for factors that might have skewed earlier results.

Each year, about six people in a million develop uveal melanoma, the most common non-skin melanoma in the United States. People age 70 or older with light skin and eye color and who are prone to sunburn most often develop the condition, according to earlier research by Weis. Treatment is available, but the mortality rate remains high.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about eye cancer.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Academy of Ophthalmology, news release, March 2, 2009

Last Updated: March 12, 2009

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