ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Acupuncture Cuts Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Alcohol Abuse Can Damage Bones
CANCER
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Ginger Can Ease Nausea From Chemotherapy Treatments
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
DENTAL, ORAL
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Holistic Dentistry-My View
DIABETES
Whole Grains Take a Bite Out of Type 2 Diabetes Risk
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
DIET, NUTRITION
To Feel Better, Low-Fat Diet May Be Best
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Eating in America Still Unhealthy
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Preparing for a Chlorine Gas Disaster
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
EYE CARE, VISION
Half of U.S. Adults Lack 20/20 Vision
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
Sports Eye Injuries Leading Cause of Blindness in Youths
FITNESS
Exercise Keeps the Brain Young
Exercise Key Player in Knee Replacement Recovery
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Vitamin D and Bone Health: Are You Getting Enough of This Important Vitamin?
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Fish Oil Supplements Help With Heart Failure
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
Protect Your Kids From Swine Flu While at Camp
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
Meditation May Boost College Students' Learning
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Pregnant Women Exposed To Certain Pollutants Could Lower Childs IQ
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
Martial Arts Training May Save Seniors' Hips
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Add your Article

Frequent Feedings May Be Making Babies Fat

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who fail to notice signs that their babies are full tend to overfeed them, resulting in excess weight gain when the infants are between 6 months and a year old, a new study has found.

The finding comes from a study by Rutgers University researchers of 96 low-income black and Hispanic mothers who formula-fed their babies. The mothers recorded information about their babies' feedings, and researchers visited the mothers when the babies were 3, 6 and 12 months old to observe feedings and to weigh the babies.

The study looked at a number of possible variables linked to infant weight gain and found that the number of feedings a day at 6 months approached significance in predicting weight gain from 6 to 12 months. It also found that mothers who were less sensitive to signals that their babies were full had infants who gained more weight.

"More frequent feedings, particularly with formula, are an easy culprit on which to assign blame," the researchers wrote. But a mother's "unwillingness to slow the pace of feeding or terminate the feeding when the infant shows satiation cues may be overriding the infant's ability to self-regulate its intake," they said.

However, they acknowledged that changing a mother's feeding habits could be extremely challenging.

"Feeding an infant is a primal behavior, and to suggest to a new mother that she is feeding her infant too often, too much or, worse yet, is not very good at reading her infant's signals would require an extremely skilled nurse or social worker," they said. "Giving counsel after watching a mother feed her infant might be seen as threatening or, at the very least, meddling, and just pointing it out could be construed as an accusation of 'poor mothering.'"

The study is in the May/June issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about feeding infants.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, news release, May 11, 2009

Last Updated: May 12, 2009

Copyright 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


More articles at www.eholistic.com