ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Birds Don't Miss a Beat
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
BONES & JOINTS
Postmenopausal Women With Breast Cancer Face Joint Issues
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
Rheumatoid Arthritis Hits Women Harder
CANCER
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Vitamin E, Selenium and Soy Won't Prevent Prostate Cancer
CAREGIVING
More Than 60,000 Patients Risked Hepatitis Infections
Study of Everest Climbers Questions Oxygen Use
Bariatric Surgery Centers Don't Deliver Better Outcomes
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Grapefruit-Heavy Diet Helped Spur Dangerous Clot
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Gum Care Helps Control Type 2 Diabetes and Its Complications
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
The Raw Food Diet
Eating Nuts May Help Cholesterol Levels
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
City Kids Find the Breathin' Is Easier Elsewhere
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Care Checkups Tied to Insurance Status
Decorative Halloween Eye Lenses May Pose Serious Risks
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Diet, Exercise May Slow Kidney Disease Progression
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
It Pays to Eat Less as You Age
Tune Up Your Health With Music
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Ginkgo Won't Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke in Elderly
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Babies Cared For In Others Homes Might Become Heavy Toddlers
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Family Medicine Cabinet Top Source Of Kid's Poisonings
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
MENTAL HEALTH
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Consciousness Helps the Mind and Body Work Together
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
How Much Fish to Eat While Pregnant?
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids
Add your Article

Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones

FRIDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Eating lots of protein and cereal grains causes excess acid production in the body, experts say, which could increase calcium excretion and result in weakened bones.

However, a new study finds that boosting alkali levels with a pill or by consuming plenty of fruits and vegetables can strengthen bones.

The study included 171 men and women aged 50 and older who were randomly assigned to receive a placebo or doses of either potassium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or potassium chloride for three months. The people who took bicarbonate showed significant reductions in calcium excretion and bone resorption.

Bone resorption is a process in which bones are broken down to release minerals such as calcium, phosphates, and alkaline (basic) salts into the blood. Increased bone resorption leads to reduced bone mass and increased fracture risk, the study authors said.

The normal diets of many older adults add acid to the body. As people age, they're less able to excrete the acid. Bone resorption is one way the body may try to counteract high acid levels.

However, "When fruits and vegetables are metabolized they add bicarbonate, an alkaline compound, to the body," Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, of Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, noted in an Endocrine Society news release.

"In this study, we demonstrated that adding alkali in pill form reduced bone resorption and reduced the losses of calcium in the urine over a three month period. This intervention warrants further investigation as a safe and well tolerated supplement to reduce bone loss and fracture risk in older men and women," lead author Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, of Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, said in an Endocrine Society news release.

The study is published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Heredity, diet, and other lifestyle factors contribute to the problem of bone loss and fractures. When it comes to dietary concerns regarding bone health, calcium and vitamin D have received the most attention, but there is increasing evidence that the acid/base balance of the diet is also important," Dawson-Hughes said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about bone health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Endocrine Society, news release, Dec. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 12, 2008

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