ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
Cranberries May Help Prevent Urinary Tract Infections
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Safe Toys for Dogs
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin K Doesn't Slow Bone Loss
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones
CANCER
Herb May Counter Liver Damage From Chemo
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
Massage Therapy Helps Those With Advanced Cancer
CAREGIVING
Tainted China Formula Caused High Rate of Kidney Stones in Kids
Falls Are Top Cause of Injury, Death Among Elderly
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
Tai Chi and Qigong Offer Many Health Benefits: Review
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
DENTAL, ORAL
Laser Technology Spots Cavities Before They Start
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
24 Million Americans Had Diabetes in 2007
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Mediterranean Diet Helps Protect Aging Brain
Eating Less May Slow Aging Process
More Calcium And Dairy Products in Childhood Could Mean Longer Life
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Main Ingredients in Household Dust Come From Outdoors
Artificial Light Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Glaucoma Associated With Reading Impairments in Elderly
Retinal Gene Is Linked to Childhood Blindness
FITNESS
Fliers Can Keep Blood Clots at Bay
Avoiding a Holiday Season of Discontent
Being Active an Hour a Day Puts Brakes on Weight Gain
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Hand Washing 10 Times a Day May Help Keep Flu Away
New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
Risk Factor for Stroke More Common Among Whites
Western Diet Linked To Heart Disease, Metabolic Syndrome
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
The HPV Vaccine: Preventative Medicine or Human Sacrifice?
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Dangerous Toys Still on Store Shelves, Report Finds
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
MEN'S HEALTH
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
Common Social Groups and Race, Seem to Help People Relate
Shop 'Til You Drop: You May Feel Better
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Exercise Boosts Bone Density in Breast-Feeding Moms
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Add your Article

Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones

FRIDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Eating lots of protein and cereal grains causes excess acid production in the body, experts say, which could increase calcium excretion and result in weakened bones.

However, a new study finds that boosting alkali levels with a pill or by consuming plenty of fruits and vegetables can strengthen bones.

The study included 171 men and women aged 50 and older who were randomly assigned to receive a placebo or doses of either potassium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or potassium chloride for three months. The people who took bicarbonate showed significant reductions in calcium excretion and bone resorption.

Bone resorption is a process in which bones are broken down to release minerals such as calcium, phosphates, and alkaline (basic) salts into the blood. Increased bone resorption leads to reduced bone mass and increased fracture risk, the study authors said.

The normal diets of many older adults add acid to the body. As people age, they're less able to excrete the acid. Bone resorption is one way the body may try to counteract high acid levels.

However, "When fruits and vegetables are metabolized they add bicarbonate, an alkaline compound, to the body," Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, of Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, noted in an Endocrine Society news release.

"In this study, we demonstrated that adding alkali in pill form reduced bone resorption and reduced the losses of calcium in the urine over a three month period. This intervention warrants further investigation as a safe and well tolerated supplement to reduce bone loss and fracture risk in older men and women," lead author Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, of Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, said in an Endocrine Society news release.

The study is published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Heredity, diet, and other lifestyle factors contribute to the problem of bone loss and fractures. When it comes to dietary concerns regarding bone health, calcium and vitamin D have received the most attention, but there is increasing evidence that the acid/base balance of the diet is also important," Dawson-Hughes said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about bone health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Endocrine Society, news release, Dec. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 12, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com