ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
New Spray Could Benefit Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Quit Smoking the Holistic Way
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Cane Use May Cut Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis
Bone Loss Stable on Restricted Calorie Diet
Healthy adults have potential autoimmune disease-causing cells
CANCER
Smoking Ups Risk of Second Breast Cancer
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
CAREGIVING
Timing May Matter in Organ Donation Decisions
Many Hospital Patients Can't ID Their Doctors
TV Watching Doesn't Fast-Track Baby's Skills
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
COSMETIC
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Hormones May Be to Blame for Women's Cavity Rates
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
DIABETES
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
Arthritis Hits More Than Half of Diabetics
Brown Rice Bests White for Diabetes Prevention
DIET, NUTRITION
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Is Your Refrigerator Getting Enough Attention For Your Raw Food Success?
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Researchers ID Genetic Markers for Esophageal Cancer
Arsenic in Drinking Water Raises Diabetes Risk
Warmer-Than-Average Temperatures Raise Migraine Risk
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
FITNESS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Can a Bad Boss Make You Sick?
Maximize Your Run
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Loves a Crowd
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
Have a Goal in Life? You Might Live Longer
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms and Babies
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Active Young Women Need Calcium, Vitamin D
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Add your Article

Fruits and Veggies May Strengthen Bones

FRIDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Eating lots of protein and cereal grains causes excess acid production in the body, experts say, which could increase calcium excretion and result in weakened bones.

However, a new study finds that boosting alkali levels with a pill or by consuming plenty of fruits and vegetables can strengthen bones.

The study included 171 men and women aged 50 and older who were randomly assigned to receive a placebo or doses of either potassium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or potassium chloride for three months. The people who took bicarbonate showed significant reductions in calcium excretion and bone resorption.

Bone resorption is a process in which bones are broken down to release minerals such as calcium, phosphates, and alkaline (basic) salts into the blood. Increased bone resorption leads to reduced bone mass and increased fracture risk, the study authors said.

The normal diets of many older adults add acid to the body. As people age, they're less able to excrete the acid. Bone resorption is one way the body may try to counteract high acid levels.

However, "When fruits and vegetables are metabolized they add bicarbonate, an alkaline compound, to the body," Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, of Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, noted in an Endocrine Society news release.

"In this study, we demonstrated that adding alkali in pill form reduced bone resorption and reduced the losses of calcium in the urine over a three month period. This intervention warrants further investigation as a safe and well tolerated supplement to reduce bone loss and fracture risk in older men and women," lead author Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes, of Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, said in an Endocrine Society news release.

The study is published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"Heredity, diet, and other lifestyle factors contribute to the problem of bone loss and fractures. When it comes to dietary concerns regarding bone health, calcium and vitamin D have received the most attention, but there is increasing evidence that the acid/base balance of the diet is also important," Dawson-Hughes said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has more about bone health.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Endocrine Society, news release, Dec. 3, 2008

Last Updated: Dec. 12, 2008

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