ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Spot light on Dani Antman New Lionheart teacher
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Pharoah's Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
Living Near Major Road May Boost Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
CANCER
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
CAREGIVING
Hospital Volume Imperfect Gauge of Cancer Surgery Outcomes
Recession Scrambling Health Spending in U.S.
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
DIABETES
Study Shows Turmeric May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Chamomile Tea May Ward Off Diabetes Damage
Fructose-Sweetened Drinks Up Metabolic Syndrome Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
Coffee Drinking Lowers Women's Stroke Risk
Olive Oil May Be Key to Mediterranean Diet's Benefits
Omega-3 May Reduce Endometriosis Risk
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Controversial Chemical Lingers Longer in the Body
Hairspray Exposure Ups Risk for Birth Defect in Sons
Rainy Areas in U.S. Show Higher Autism Rates
EYE CARE, VISION
High Temps Degrade Contact Lens Solution: Study
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
Glaucoma Treatment Can Prevent Blindness
FITNESS
Keep Safety in Mind While Your Kids Are Cooling Off in the Water
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Seniors Who Exercise Help Their Health
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Gum Chewing May Speed Colon Surgery Recovery
GENERAL HEALTH
Sleep and Do Better
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
You Can Get Great Exercise In The Garden
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Study Suggests Link Between Cell Phones and Brain Tumors
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Fewer Heart Attacks After England Goes Smoke-Free
How Weight Loss Can Help the Heart
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Quick Orthopedic Repair Can Save Young Shoulders
Help Your Kids Stay Active
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Soy Linked to Low Sperm Count
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
MENTAL HEALTH
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Mind Exercise Might Help Stroke Patients
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
Exercise Benefits Even the Oldest Old
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Rheumatoid Arthritis Rising Among U.S. Women
Health Tip: Be More Comfortable During Childbirth
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Eating fruits and vegetables rich in flavonoids and drinking tea may help protect smokers from lung cancer, say researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Flavonoids are water-soluble plant pigments that have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can counteract damage to tissues. The UCLA team made the conclusion based on a study of the dietary habits of smokers with and without lung cancer.

The flavonoids that appeared to be most effective were catechin (found in strawberries and green and black teas), kaempferol (Brussels sprouts and apples) and quercetin, (beans, onions and apples).

The finding, published in the June issue of Cancer, could be important as tobacco smoking causes more than 90 percent of lung cancers.

"Since this study is the first of its type, I would usually be hesitant to make any recommendations to people about their diet," Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, a researcher at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and a professor of public health and epidemiology, said in a prepared statement. "We really need to have several larger studies with similar results to confirm our finding. However, it's not a bad idea for everyone to eat more fruits and vegetables and drink more tea."

Flavonoids may protect against lung cancer by stopping the development of blood vessels that tumors need to grow and spread, a process called angiogenesis, Zhang said. They may also stop cancer cells from growing, allowing a naturally programmed cell death, or apoptosis, to occur.

Flavonoids' antioxidant properties may also counteract the damage tobacco smoke does to DNA, Zhang said, noting that flavonoids affect the development of lung cancer in smokers but not in nonsmokers.

"The naturally occurring chemicals may be working to reduce the damage caused by smoking," Zhang said.

He said larger studies to confirm these findings are need as well as studies to see whether flavonoids help protect against other smoking-related cancers, such as bladder, head and neck and kidney cancers.

A follow-up study into which fruits and vegetables have the most flavonoids found to be effective in first study and what an optimal number of servings per day might be to provide the best protection against lung cancer is being planned by the UCLA team.

More information

The Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University has more about flavonoids.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of California, Los Angeles, news release, May 29, 2008

Last Updated: June 05, 2008

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