ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Acupuncture May Not Help Hot Flashes
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Safe Toys for Dogs
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
'Snowbirds' Beware the Climate Changes
CANCER
Omega-3 May Safely Treat Precancerous Bowel Polyps
Red Meat No No No But Oily Fish Yes Yes Yes
Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Hospital Practices Influence Which Moms Will Breast-Feed
Mild Flu Season Coming to a Close
Study Casts Doubt on Influential Hospital Safety Survey
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bye, Bye Back Fat?
Smog Tougher on the Obese
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Study Evaluates Laser Therapies for Hair Removal
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
DENTAL, ORAL
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
DIABETES
Older Diabetics With Depression Face Higher Death Rate
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Decline of Underweight Children in U.S. Continue to Fall
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
Eating your way to Good Health
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Cats Can Trigger Eczema in Some Infants
Chemical in Plastics May Cause Fertility Problems
Greener Neighborhoods Mean Slimmer Children
EYE CARE, VISION
It's a Whole New Outlook for Cataract Patients
Omega-3 Foods May Lower Eye Disease Risk
Brain Adapts to Age-Related Eye Disease
FITNESS
'Safe' Ozone Levels May Not Be for Some
Maximize Your Run
Bursts of Vigorous Activity Appear to Be a 'Stress-Buffer'
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Natural Oils Help Lower Body Fat For Some
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
HEAD & NECK
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Cherry-Enriched Diet Cut Heart Risks in Rats
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Kids With Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Heart Trouble
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
MEN'S HEALTH
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Sunlight May Help Protect Men From Kidney Cancer
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Musicians' Brains Tuned to Emotions in Sound
The Unmedicated Mind
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
For Baby and Mom Alike, Breast-Feeding May Be Best
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
A Little Alcohol May Stave Off Alzheimer's
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Natural Childbirth Moms More Attuned to Babies' Cry
Supportive Weigh-In Program Keeps Pounds Off
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
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Fruits, Vegetables, Teas May Cut Smokers' Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Eating fruits and vegetables rich in flavonoids and drinking tea may help protect smokers from lung cancer, say researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Flavonoids are water-soluble plant pigments that have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can counteract damage to tissues. The UCLA team made the conclusion based on a study of the dietary habits of smokers with and without lung cancer.

The flavonoids that appeared to be most effective were catechin (found in strawberries and green and black teas), kaempferol (Brussels sprouts and apples) and quercetin, (beans, onions and apples).

The finding, published in the June issue of Cancer, could be important as tobacco smoking causes more than 90 percent of lung cancers.

"Since this study is the first of its type, I would usually be hesitant to make any recommendations to people about their diet," Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang, a researcher at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and a professor of public health and epidemiology, said in a prepared statement. "We really need to have several larger studies with similar results to confirm our finding. However, it's not a bad idea for everyone to eat more fruits and vegetables and drink more tea."

Flavonoids may protect against lung cancer by stopping the development of blood vessels that tumors need to grow and spread, a process called angiogenesis, Zhang said. They may also stop cancer cells from growing, allowing a naturally programmed cell death, or apoptosis, to occur.

Flavonoids' antioxidant properties may also counteract the damage tobacco smoke does to DNA, Zhang said, noting that flavonoids affect the development of lung cancer in smokers but not in nonsmokers.

"The naturally occurring chemicals may be working to reduce the damage caused by smoking," Zhang said.

He said larger studies to confirm these findings are need as well as studies to see whether flavonoids help protect against other smoking-related cancers, such as bladder, head and neck and kidney cancers.

A follow-up study into which fruits and vegetables have the most flavonoids found to be effective in first study and what an optimal number of servings per day might be to provide the best protection against lung cancer is being planned by the UCLA team.

More information

The Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University has more about flavonoids.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of California, Los Angeles, news release, May 29, 2008

Last Updated: June 05, 2008

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