ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
ANIMAL CARE
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
BONES & JOINTS
Brazilian Mint Tea Naturally Good for Pain Relief
More Faces Being Spared in Motor Vehicle Accidents
Weight Loss Might Not Curb Knee Arthritis
CANCER
Where You Live May Affect Your Cancer Diagnosis
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Broccoli May Help Battle Breast Cancer
CAREGIVING
Diabetes Epidemic Now Poses Challenges for Nursing Homes
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
Medication Errors Could Be Cut: Experts
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
COSMETIC
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
DENTAL, ORAL
Scientists Find Gene for Tooth Enamel
Health Tip: At Risk for Gingivitis
Sports Drinks May Be Tough on Teeth
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
DIET, NUTRITION
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
Trans-Fat Ban In New York City Is Proving successful
Purple Tomato Extended Lives of Cancer-Prone Mice
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Agent Orange Exposure Tied to Prostate Cancer Return
Global Warming May Bring More Respiratory Woes
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
EYE CARE, VISION
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Ordinary Chores Cause Half of All Eye Injuries
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
FITNESS
Good Warm-Ups Could Halve Sports Injuries
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Football Can Shrink Players
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Olive Oil May Protect Against Bowel Disease
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
Traditional Nonsurgical GERD Treatments Not Impressive
GENERAL HEALTH
Want Better Health in the New Year, Add Exercise to Your Day
Tune Up Your Health With Music
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Omega-6 Fatty Acids Can Be Good for You
Boosting Vitamin D Can Do a Heart Good
Arteries Age Twice as Fast in Smokers
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Folic Acid Reduces Infant Heart Defects
Teen Stress May Have Roots in First Three Years of Life
Boosting Kids' Stroke IQ May Save Lives
MEN'S HEALTH
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
Drinking Green Tea May Slow Prostate Cancer
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
The Unmedicated Mind
Estrogen May Help Men's Hearts
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
SENIORS
More Whole Grains May Mean Less Fat
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Moderate Aerobics May Ease Insomnia Symptoms
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
Caffeine in Pregnancy Associated With Low Birth Weight Risk
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
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Gas Cooking Might Up Your Cancer Risk

Slaving over a hot stove -- make that a hot gas stove -- might raise your risk for certain types of cancer.

Researchers in Norway have found that cooking with gas produces more potentially harmful fumes than electric cooking.

But, in a report published online Feb. 17 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, they also point out that professional chefs and cooks are more at risk than the average at-home cook.

"The risk to average at-home cookers is low, at least under Norwegian conditions, where most homes have a kitchen exhaust fan," said study author Ann Kristin Sjaastad, who's with the industrial economics and technology management department in the division of health environment and safety at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. "Yes, professional chefs/cooks are most at risk, but further studies are necessary to estimate their risk level."

The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified cooking fumes from frying at high temperatures as "probably carcinogenic." The fumes have been found to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic amines, higher and mutated aldehydes, and fine and ultrafine particles.

But a remaining question has been what role, if any, does the energy source -- gas or electric-- or type of fat used in frying play in producing the fumes.

The researchers created a kitchen typical of those in Western European restaurants, measuring 19 square meters (62 feet) and containing both a gas stove and an electric stove with a canopy hood.

They fried 17 pieces of beefsteak, each weighing about a pound, in both margarine and soya bean oil for 15 minutes. The only PAH found was napthalene (now banned, but once found in mothballs), most notably when frying with margarine on a gas stove, according to the report.

The highest levels of all compounds, including ultrafine particles that more easily penetrate the lungs, were produced while frying with gas.

However, even the higher levels of particles found in the study were below accepted occupational safety thresholds. But the researchers noted that cooking fumes contain various other harmful components for which there is as yet no clear safety threshold and that gas cooking seems to increase exposure to these components.

Regardless of the level of risk, cooks should follow certain "safe cooking" guidelines, said Dr. Lisa Ganjhu, an attending physician in the division of gastroenterology and liver diseases at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City.

That means don't barbeque or char meat, don't overheat the oil because that increases the level of toxins in the food, do use a drip pan so that grilling fat doesn't touch the fire, make sure the exhaust fan is on and microwave meat before it's grilled.

"In their homes, people can make sure that they have a powerful exhaust fan, preferably one that is vented directly to the outside and does not have a charcoal filter, Sjaastad emphasized. "Also, the fan must be run on the highest level of capacity to be efficient. Suction is improved if the fan is placed between two walls, between two cupboards or up to a corner. It is also very important to let the fan run for 15 minutes after you're done cooking. In addition, people may reduce the amount of pan frying, for instance, by frying their steak shortly in the pan at first, and then bake it in the oven until it is finished."

SOURCES: Lisa Ganjhu, D.O., attending physician, division of gastroenterology and liver diseases, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, and assistant professor, clinical medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City; Ann Kristin Sjaastad, Ph.D., department of industrial economics and technology management, division of health environment and safety, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Feb. 17, 2010, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, online Published on: February 19, 2010