ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Eight Spiritual Universal Principles in the Art of Practice
Soybean Chemicals May Reduce Effects of Menopause
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Safe Toys for Dogs
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
CANCER
Method for Treating Cervical Lesions May Pose Pregnancy Risks
Many Ignore Symptoms of Bladder Trouble
More Cancer Tests Mean More False-Positive Results
CAREGIVING
Coordination Has Led to Quicker Heart Treatment
Children's Bath Products Contain Contaminants
Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
Secondhand Smoke Quickly Affects Blood Vessels
Drink a Little Wine, Live a Little Longer
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
Science May Banish Bad Hair Days
DENTAL, ORAL
Acid Drinks Blamed for Increase in Tooth Erosion
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
Gum Disease May Reactivate AIDS Virus
DIABETES
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Vitamin K Slows Insulin Resistance in Older Men
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Shedding Light on Why Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Help the Heart
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
Cinnamon Breaks Up Brain Plaques, May Hold Key to Fighting Alzheimer’s
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Most Mt. Everest Deaths Occur Near Summit During Descent
Sunken, Unexploded Bombs Pose Cancer Risk
EPA Alerts Seniors to Carbon Monoxide Dangers
EYE CARE, VISION
Florida Vision Test Law: Fewer Traffic Deaths Among Elderly
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
Action-Filled Video Games Boost Adult Vision
FITNESS
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Study Shows Exercise Shields Against Osteoporosis
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Japanese Herbals May Ease Gastro Woes
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
Man Dies of Brain Inflammation Caused by Deer Tick Virus
'Organic' May Not Mean Healthier
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Implanted Defibrillators Boost Long-Term Survival
Fatty Fish May Cut Heart Failure Risk in Men
A Little Chocolate May Do the Heart Good
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Closes Three Schools in NYC
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Traffic Seems to Make Kids' Asthma Worse
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Green Tea May Help Brain Cope With Sleep Disorders
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Countdown to Hair Loss
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
SENIORS
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Seniors Who Volunteer May Live Longer
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
For Women, Moderate Midlife Drinking Linked to Healthier Old Age
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
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Gene Plays Key Role in Clubfoot

MONDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The first gene linked to clubfoot has been identified by researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, who analyzed the DNA of 35 extended family members of a male infant with clubfoot.

Through their analysis, the study authors concluded that a mutation in a gene called PITX1 -- which is critical for early development of lower limbs -- was responsible for the condition. The mutation was found in all 13 affected family members and in three carriers who showed no clinical symptoms.

Other genes may also play a role in clubfoot, but this finding is an initial step toward improved genetic counseling and the development of new therapies, the researchers said. The study appears in the Nov. 7 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

"To our knowledge this report is the first evidence for PITX1 mutation in human disease," Dr. Christina Gurnett, an assistant professor of neurology, of pediatrics and of orthopedic surgery, said in a university news release. "Once we identified the mutation, we proved that all of the individuals in this family with lower extremity malformations also have the mutation. Having large families to work with is very helpful in genetic research."

Clubfoot, which affects about one in 1,000 newborns, is "a complex disorder meaning that more than one gene as well as environmental factors will be discovered to play a role in its [cause]," study senior author and clubfoot specialist Dr. Matthew Dobbs, an associate professor of orthopedic surgery, said in the news release.

In about 80 percent of clubfoot cases, the cause is unknown, while a familial link plays a role in about 25 percent of cases, according to background information about the study. Males are twice as likely as females to have clubfoot, which occurs more often in the right foot. About half of cases affect both feet.

More information

The March of Dimes has more about clubfoot.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Washington University, news release, Oct. 23, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 27, 2008

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