ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Keep Asthma, Allergies at Bay for the Holidays
Molecule in Skin May Link Eczema and Asthma
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Health Tip: Anticipating Acupuncture
Garlic Yields Up Its Health Secret
Meditation May Boost Short-Term Visual Memory
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
Beware of Dog Bites
BONES & JOINTS
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Chronic Low Back Pain Is on the Rise
CANCER
Smokeout '08: The Perfect Time to Quit
Supplements Might Reduce Breast Cancer Risk
Smoking Exposure Now Linked to Colon, Breast Cancers
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
Mom's Smoking May Lead to SIDS
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Potassium-Rich Foods May Cut Stroke, Heart Disease Risk
Migraines in Pregnancy Boost Vascular Risks
COSMETIC
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Periodontal Disease Impacts Whole Health
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
Lifestyle Factors Tied to Older Adults' Diabetes Risk
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
Mercury in Fish Linked to High Blood Pressure
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
For Fitness, Cutting Calories May Not Be Enough
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Dementia Underestimated in Developing Countries
Air Pollution May Cause Appendicitis: Study Reveals
EYE CARE, VISION
'Blind' Man Navigates Obstacle Course Without Error
Certain Diabetes Drugs May Pose Eye Risk
Diabetic Eye Disease Rates Soaring
FITNESS
Exercise 30 Minutes a Day? Who Knew!
Fall Cleanup Is a Prime Time for Accidents
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
Peppermint Oil, Fiber Can Fight Irritable Bowel
GENERAL HEALTH
Kids More Apt to Smoke If Mom Did While Pregnant
Stressed and Exhausted: An Introduction to Adrenal Fatigue
Reminiscing Helps Build Emotional Strength
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
Using Light Therapy to Silence Harmful Brain Activity
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Years of Heavy Smoking Raises Heart Risks
Relaxation Tapes or Mozart Lower Blood Pressure
Ingredient in Dark Chocolate Could Guard Against Stroke
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Swine Flu Now Reported in All 50 States
Swine Flu Is Now a Pandemic Says W.H.O.
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Bullying Seems to Affect Kids Years Later
Mom and Baby Alike May Benefit From Exercise
Teen Internet Addicts More Likely to Self-Harm: Study
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
More Vitamin C May Mean Less Chance of Gout
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
MENTAL HEALTH
Keeping Mentally Active Seems To Keep The Brain Active
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
17 Ways to Create the Perfect Workday
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Woman in America Are Delaying Motherhood, Study Says
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
High-Impact Activity May Be Good for Old Bones
Video Gaming Just Might Fight Aging
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Pay Attention to Signs That Say You're Too Fatigued to Drive
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Exercise As Well As Acupuncture, May Ease Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
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Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers

FRIDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys with a certain genetic makeup are more likely to have delinquent peers, researchers say.

Being antisocial, using drugs, and criminal behavior is known to be linked to having delinquent peers. And belonging to a delinquent peer group is one of the strongest predictors of criminal behavior.

A study published in the September issue of the Journal of Genetic Psychology looked at the genetic makeup of 1,816 boys in middle and high school.

The researchers found that the boys who had a particular variation -- the 10-repeat allele -- in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) were more likely to be affiliated with delinquent peers. However, the gene variation only affected the risk of having delinquent peers in a certain environment.

In boys who were from a high-risk family environment, marked by a disengaged mother and absence of maternal affection, the DAT1 variant was associated with having delinquent peers. But in those who lived in low-risk families (those with high maternal engagement and warmth), the DAT1 variant was not statistically associated with having antisocial peers.

"Our research has confirmed the importance of not only the genome, but also the environment," Kevin M. Beaver, a criminologist at Florida State University, said in a school news release.

Beaver said that he and his colleagues can only hypothesize why the variant just affected the boys from high-risk families.

"Perhaps the 10-repeat allele is triggered by constant stress or the general lack of support, whereas in low-risk households, the variation might remain inactive," he said. "Or it's possible that the 10-repeat allele increases an adolescent boy's attraction to delinquent peers regardless of family type, but parents from low-risk families are simply better able to monitor and control such genetic tendencies."

The 10-repeat allele was not associated with an affinity for antisocial peers among adolescent girls, whether the girls lived in a high-risk or low-risk environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about the gene-environment interaction.



-- Krisha McCoy



SOURCE: Florida State University, news release, Oct. 1, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 10, 2008

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