ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Air Quality Better in Northeast, Midwest
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Fish Oil's Benefits Remain Elusive
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
BONES & JOINTS
Yoga Can Ease Lower Back Pain
Majority of College Students Report Backpack-Related Pain
Winter Is Tough on Feet
CANCER
Adding Garlic Might Cut Cancer Risk
Many Cancer Survivors Don't Adopt Healthy Lifestyle
Selenium, Omega-3s May Stave Off Colorectal Cancer
CAREGIVING
UV Lights, Fans May Curb TB Spread in Hospitals
Late-Life Fatherhood May Lower Child's Intelligence
For Dialysis Patients, More Pills = Lower Quality of Life
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Laughter Can Boost Heart Health
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
COSMETIC
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
DENTAL, ORAL
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
Amino Acid May Be Key to Strong Teeth
Mom's Vitamin D Levels Affect Baby's Dental Health
DIABETES
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Compound in Berries May Lessen Sun Damage
'Soda Tax' Wins Health Experts' Support
Eating Healthy : You Can Live Longer
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Walkable Neighborhoods Keep the Pounds Off
Freckles, Moles May Indicate Risk for Eye Cancer
EYE CARE, VISION
Don't Lose Sight of Halloween Safety
Autistic Children Make Limited Eye Contact
Diabetic Hispanics Missing Out on Eye Exams
FITNESS
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
The Juice From Beetroots May Boost Stamina
Simple Exercise Precautions To Help Keep Baby Boomers Fit
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
GENERAL HEALTH
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
Music Therapy For Prehistoric Man?
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Magnet Therapy May Ease Hard-to-Treat Depression
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Chinese Red Yeast Rice May Prevent Heart Attack
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Chinese 'Devil Dung' Plant Could Be a Swine Flu Fighter
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Standard IQ Test May Underestimate People With Autism
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
Music May Temper Pain in Preemies
MEN'S HEALTH
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Low Iron Levels Cut Cancer Risk in Men With PAD
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
MENTAL HEALTH
The 3LS Wellness Program for Reversing Chronic Symptoms and Creating Lasting Health
Music Soothes Anxiety as Well as Massage Does
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Prenatal Stress May Boost Baby's Asthma Risk
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
SENIORS
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
Fitness Fades Fast After 45
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Flame-Retardant Chemical Linked to Conception Problems
Calcium Helps Ward Off Colon Cancer
Frankincense Provides Relief for Osteoarthritis
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Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers

FRIDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys with a certain genetic makeup are more likely to have delinquent peers, researchers say.

Being antisocial, using drugs, and criminal behavior is known to be linked to having delinquent peers. And belonging to a delinquent peer group is one of the strongest predictors of criminal behavior.

A study published in the September issue of the Journal of Genetic Psychology looked at the genetic makeup of 1,816 boys in middle and high school.

The researchers found that the boys who had a particular variation -- the 10-repeat allele -- in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) were more likely to be affiliated with delinquent peers. However, the gene variation only affected the risk of having delinquent peers in a certain environment.

In boys who were from a high-risk family environment, marked by a disengaged mother and absence of maternal affection, the DAT1 variant was associated with having delinquent peers. But in those who lived in low-risk families (those with high maternal engagement and warmth), the DAT1 variant was not statistically associated with having antisocial peers.

"Our research has confirmed the importance of not only the genome, but also the environment," Kevin M. Beaver, a criminologist at Florida State University, said in a school news release.

Beaver said that he and his colleagues can only hypothesize why the variant just affected the boys from high-risk families.

"Perhaps the 10-repeat allele is triggered by constant stress or the general lack of support, whereas in low-risk households, the variation might remain inactive," he said. "Or it's possible that the 10-repeat allele increases an adolescent boy's attraction to delinquent peers regardless of family type, but parents from low-risk families are simply better able to monitor and control such genetic tendencies."

The 10-repeat allele was not associated with an affinity for antisocial peers among adolescent girls, whether the girls lived in a high-risk or low-risk environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about the gene-environment interaction.



-- Krisha McCoy



SOURCE: Florida State University, news release, Oct. 1, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 10, 2008

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