ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Traffic, Dust Linked to Asthma in Kids
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Awareness of Alternative Therapies May Be Lacking
Wristbands May Lessen Nausea After Radiation
Maggots as Good as Gel in Leg Ulcer Treatments
ANIMAL CARE
Beware of Dog Bites
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
A Winning Strategy to Beat Spring Sporting Injuries
In Elderly Women, Hip Fractures Often Follow Arm Breaks
Soccer's a Winner for Building Bone Health in Girls
CANCER
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Green Tea Compound Slowed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Survivors
CAREGIVING
Child's Food Allergies Take Toll on Family Plans
Undoing the 'Big Baby' Trend
With Alzheimer's, Health-Care Costs Could Triple
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
An Apple a Day May Help Keep Heart Disease Away
Firefighters Have Narrower-Than-Normal Arteries, Study Finds
COSMETIC
Contact Lenses Boost Kids' Self-Image
Health Tip: After Liposuction
With Psoriasis, the Internet May Offer Hope
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Acupuncture May Ease Anxiety Over Dental Work
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
DIABETES
Coffee, Tea Might Stave Off Diabetes
Insulin Resistance Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease
Red-Grape Compound May Improve Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Herb Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthriti
Added Sugars in Diet Threaten Heart Health
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
As Earth Warms, Lyme Disease Could Flourish
Genetics, Environment Shape Sexual Behavior
Golf Course Insecticides Pose Little Danger to Players
EYE CARE, VISION
Thyroid Problems Boost Glaucoma Risk
Stem Cells Repair Damaged Corneas in Mice
FDA Goes After Unapproved Eye Washes, Skin Ointments
FITNESS
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
After a Stroke, Light Exercise Gets Hands, Arms Working Again
Brisk Walk Can Help Leave Common Cold Behind
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
GENERAL HEALTH
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
The Yearly Flu Shot Debate
Winter's Bitter Cold Poses Health Dangers
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Save Your Aging Brain, Try Surfing The Web
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Rheumatoid Arthritis a Threat to the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Grapefruit Compound Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
When It Comes to Toys, Shop Smart, Shop Safe
Plastics Chemical Tied to Aggression in Young Girls
Breast-Feeding May Protect a Woman's Heart
MEN'S HEALTH
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Exercise May Prevent Prostate Cancer: Study Shows
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
MENTAL HEALTH
Vitamin C Protects Some Elderly Men From Bone Loss
The Unmedicated Mind
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Before Conceiving, Take Folic Acid for One Full Year
Calcium Supplements Cut Blood Lead Levels During Pregnancy
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
Memory Loss Help from Brain Supplement Prevagen
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
Spice Compounds May Stem Tumor Growth
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Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers

FRIDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys with a certain genetic makeup are more likely to have delinquent peers, researchers say.

Being antisocial, using drugs, and criminal behavior is known to be linked to having delinquent peers. And belonging to a delinquent peer group is one of the strongest predictors of criminal behavior.

A study published in the September issue of the Journal of Genetic Psychology looked at the genetic makeup of 1,816 boys in middle and high school.

The researchers found that the boys who had a particular variation -- the 10-repeat allele -- in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) were more likely to be affiliated with delinquent peers. However, the gene variation only affected the risk of having delinquent peers in a certain environment.

In boys who were from a high-risk family environment, marked by a disengaged mother and absence of maternal affection, the DAT1 variant was associated with having delinquent peers. But in those who lived in low-risk families (those with high maternal engagement and warmth), the DAT1 variant was not statistically associated with having antisocial peers.

"Our research has confirmed the importance of not only the genome, but also the environment," Kevin M. Beaver, a criminologist at Florida State University, said in a school news release.

Beaver said that he and his colleagues can only hypothesize why the variant just affected the boys from high-risk families.

"Perhaps the 10-repeat allele is triggered by constant stress or the general lack of support, whereas in low-risk households, the variation might remain inactive," he said. "Or it's possible that the 10-repeat allele increases an adolescent boy's attraction to delinquent peers regardless of family type, but parents from low-risk families are simply better able to monitor and control such genetic tendencies."

The 10-repeat allele was not associated with an affinity for antisocial peers among adolescent girls, whether the girls lived in a high-risk or low-risk environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about the gene-environment interaction.



-- Krisha McCoy



SOURCE: Florida State University, news release, Oct. 1, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 10, 2008

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