ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Obesity May Raise Kids' Allergy Risk
Know Your Asthma Triggers
Folic Acid Might Offer Allergy Relief
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Ginkgo No Shield Against Alzheimer's
Indian Spice May Thwart Liver Damage
Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy
ANIMAL CARE
Rest Easy. When It Comes to Swine Flu, Your Pet Is Safe
Beware of Dog Bites
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Too Few Screened for Abdominal Aneurysm, Study Says
Hip Replacement Boosts Mobility at Any Age
Returning to the Road Tricky After Injury
CANCER
Sharing Cancer Info May Be Empowering
Immune Therapy May Aid Kids With Neuroblastoma
Papaya Could Be a Cancer Fighter
CAREGIVING
Caring for Aging Loved Ones Can Be a Catch-22
ER Less Likely to Diagnose Stroke in Younger Folks
Many Alzheimer's Caregivers Admit to Abusive Behavior
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Bad Marriages Harder on Women's Health
Exercise Extends Life of Kidney Patients
High Blood Fat Levels Common in Americans
COSMETIC
What to Do If You Have Unsightly Veins
Wrinkle Fillers Need Better Label Warnings: FDA Panel
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
DENTAL, ORAL
Gum Disease Treatment Doesn't Cut Preterm Birth Risk
Biological Product Shows Promise Against Gum Disease
Gum Disease Might Boost Cancer Risk
DIABETES
Fish Twice a Week Cuts Diabetics' Kidney Risks
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Saliva Test Could Monitor Type 2 Diabetes
DIET, NUTRITION
Eat Light - Live Longer
Breakfast Eggs Keep Folks on Diet
Many Kids Don't Need the Vitamins They're Taking
DISABILITIES
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Global Warming Linked to Heightened Kidney Stone Risk
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
EYE CARE, VISION
Clues Found to Brain Mechanism Behind Migraines
When Gauging Age, the Eyes Have It
When Corks Fly, Watch the Eyes
FITNESS
Higher Fitness Levels Tied to Lower Heart, Death Risks
Weak Muscles May Cause 'Runner's Knee'
Go To Work But Skip The Car
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
New Guidelines Issued for Management of IBS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
GENERAL HEALTH
Hoping for a Happy Family Holiday? Here's How
Study Supports Swine Flu's Pandemic Potential
Less Education May Mean Poorer Health
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Walk Long, Slow and Often to Help the Heart
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Surgical Masks Could Prevent Flu, Maybe
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Wood Fires Can Harm the Youngest Lungs
Childhood Dairy Intake Boosts Bone Health Later On
School Phys. Ed. Injuries Up 150 Percent
MEN'S HEALTH
Vigorous Exercise Cuts Stroke Risk for Men, Not Women
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men
MENTAL HEALTH
Worries About Weight Are Tied to Teen Suicide Tries
Chocolate a Sweet Pick-Me-Up for the Depressed
Drink Away Dementia?
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
Acupuncture May Relieve Acid Indigestation In Pregnancy
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
Nighttime Urination Linked to Higher Death Rate Among Elderly
Boost In Elderly Population Will Be Felt Worldwide
Community Exercise Programs Boost Seniors' Strength
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Heal Your Life® Tips for Living Well
Soy May Not Lead to Denser Breasts
A Brisk Pace May Keep Stroke at Bay
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Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers

FRIDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys with a certain genetic makeup are more likely to have delinquent peers, researchers say.

Being antisocial, using drugs, and criminal behavior is known to be linked to having delinquent peers. And belonging to a delinquent peer group is one of the strongest predictors of criminal behavior.

A study published in the September issue of the Journal of Genetic Psychology looked at the genetic makeup of 1,816 boys in middle and high school.

The researchers found that the boys who had a particular variation -- the 10-repeat allele -- in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) were more likely to be affiliated with delinquent peers. However, the gene variation only affected the risk of having delinquent peers in a certain environment.

In boys who were from a high-risk family environment, marked by a disengaged mother and absence of maternal affection, the DAT1 variant was associated with having delinquent peers. But in those who lived in low-risk families (those with high maternal engagement and warmth), the DAT1 variant was not statistically associated with having antisocial peers.

"Our research has confirmed the importance of not only the genome, but also the environment," Kevin M. Beaver, a criminologist at Florida State University, said in a school news release.

Beaver said that he and his colleagues can only hypothesize why the variant just affected the boys from high-risk families.

"Perhaps the 10-repeat allele is triggered by constant stress or the general lack of support, whereas in low-risk households, the variation might remain inactive," he said. "Or it's possible that the 10-repeat allele increases an adolescent boy's attraction to delinquent peers regardless of family type, but parents from low-risk families are simply better able to monitor and control such genetic tendencies."

The 10-repeat allele was not associated with an affinity for antisocial peers among adolescent girls, whether the girls lived in a high-risk or low-risk environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about the gene-environment interaction.



-- Krisha McCoy



SOURCE: Florida State University, news release, Oct. 1, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 10, 2008

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