ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage
Herbal Remedy Could Halt Peanut Allergy
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Should Your Child Be Seeing a Chiropractor?
Taking the Mystery Out of Hypnotherapy
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
BONES & JOINTS
Fractures in Older Adults Up Death Risk
Gene Therapy May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Almost Half of Adults Will Develop Knee Osteoarthritis by 85
CANCER
Bitter Melon Extract May Slow, Stop Breast Cancer
Occaisonal Dieting May Cut Breast Cancer, Study Says
HPV Vaccine Has Higher Allergic Reaction Rate
CAREGIVING
Injected Medication Errors a Major Problem
Health Tip: Benefitting From Adult Day Care
Few Hospitals Embracing Electronic Health Record Systems
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Obesity Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Exercise May Blunt Salt's Effect on Hypertension
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Health Tip: After Liposuction
New Genetic Links to Baldness Discovered
DENTAL, ORAL
Holistic Dentistry-My View
Gummy Bears Join Cavity Fight
A Sweet Way to Shield Baby's Teeth
DIABETES
Exercise Protects Black Women From Type 2 Diabetes
Findings Challenge Tight Glucose Control for Critically Ill Patients
Out-of-Control Blood Sugar May Affect Memory
DIET, NUTRITION
The Food Irradiation Story
Vitamin D Vital for the Heart
Pesticides and How to Affordably Eat Organic or Reduce Pesticide Consumption
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Stomach Germ May Protect Against Asthma
Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference
Exhaust From Railroad Diesel Linked to Lung Ailments
EYE CARE, VISION
Eye Disease, Cognitive Decline Linked in Study
Statin Drugs Cause Eye Disorders
Kids' Eye Injuries From Golf Clubs Rare But Severe
FITNESS
MRSA Infections Can Bug Fitness Buffs
Have Fun This Summer, But DO Be Careful
Research Confirms How Valuable A Healthy Lifestyle Can Be
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Bowel Prep Harder on Women Than Men
Intestinal Bacteria Trigger Immune Response
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
GENERAL HEALTH
Lower Vitamin D Levels in Blacks May Up Heart Risks
Heart Disease May Be Prevented By Taking Fish Oils, Study Shows
Smog Tougher on the Obese
HEAD & NECK
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
The Internet Is Becoming One-Stop Shopping for Health Help
Airport Full Body Scanners Pose No Health Threat: Experts
Subway Defibrillators Save Lives
HEARING
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Review Confirms Links Between Diet, Heart Health
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
Soy Protein Doesn't Lower Cholesterol
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Dry Weather Boosts Odds of Flu Outbreaks
Bacterial Infections May Succumb to Honey
Viral Infection Might Trigger High Blood Pressure
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Heart Defects in Newborns Linked to Antidepressants
Most Depressed Teens Don't Get Treatment
Even Young Kids Can Learn CPR
MEN'S HEALTH
Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Men's Heart Attack Risk
Lots of Sex May Prevent Erectile Dysfunction
Physical Activity May Prolong Survival After Colon Cancer
MENTAL HEALTH
Living Alone Increases Odds of Developing Dementia
Environmental Chemicals May Affect Male Reproduction
A Simple 'Thank You' Brings Rewards to All
PAIN
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Eases Back Pain
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Expectant Mom's Exercise Keeps Newborn's Birth Weight Down
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Pre-Pregnancy Weight Linked to Babies' Heart Problems
SENIORS
Common Antioxidant Might Slow Parkinson's
Life Expectancy in U.S. Hits New High
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Better Sleep, Grades Seem to Go Up
6 to 8 Hours of Shut-Eye Is Optimal for Health
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Steady Weight Gain Boosts Late-Life Breast Cancer Risk
Sugary Colas Tied to Gestational Diabetes
Add your Article

Gene Variation Found in Boys With Delinquent Peers

FRIDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys with a certain genetic makeup are more likely to have delinquent peers, researchers say.

Being antisocial, using drugs, and criminal behavior is known to be linked to having delinquent peers. And belonging to a delinquent peer group is one of the strongest predictors of criminal behavior.

A study published in the September issue of the Journal of Genetic Psychology looked at the genetic makeup of 1,816 boys in middle and high school.

The researchers found that the boys who had a particular variation -- the 10-repeat allele -- in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) were more likely to be affiliated with delinquent peers. However, the gene variation only affected the risk of having delinquent peers in a certain environment.

In boys who were from a high-risk family environment, marked by a disengaged mother and absence of maternal affection, the DAT1 variant was associated with having delinquent peers. But in those who lived in low-risk families (those with high maternal engagement and warmth), the DAT1 variant was not statistically associated with having antisocial peers.

"Our research has confirmed the importance of not only the genome, but also the environment," Kevin M. Beaver, a criminologist at Florida State University, said in a school news release.

Beaver said that he and his colleagues can only hypothesize why the variant just affected the boys from high-risk families.

"Perhaps the 10-repeat allele is triggered by constant stress or the general lack of support, whereas in low-risk households, the variation might remain inactive," he said. "Or it's possible that the 10-repeat allele increases an adolescent boy's attraction to delinquent peers regardless of family type, but parents from low-risk families are simply better able to monitor and control such genetic tendencies."

The 10-repeat allele was not associated with an affinity for antisocial peers among adolescent girls, whether the girls lived in a high-risk or low-risk environment.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about the gene-environment interaction.



-- Krisha McCoy



SOURCE: Florida State University, news release, Oct. 1, 2008

Last Updated: Oct. 10, 2008

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