ALLERGY, RESPIRATORY
Childhood Food Allergies on the Rise
Overweight Moms More Likely to Have Asthmatic Kids
Using Music and Sports to Improve Kids' Asthma
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Holistic Treatment for Candida Infection
Tai Chi: An Ideal Exercise for Many People with Diabetes
Placebo Acupuncture Tied to Higher IVF Pregnancies
ANIMAL CARE
Animals Respond to Acupuncture's Healing Touch
Separation Anxiety, Canine-Style
'Comfort Dogs' Come to Emotional Rescue
BONES & JOINTS
Get in Step With Summer Foot Care
Breast-feeding Might Shield Women From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Vitamin D Plus Calcium Guards Against Fractures
CANCER
More Americans Urged to Get Cancer Screenings
Quitting Smoking Doubles Survival in Early Stage Lung Cancer
Meditation May Reduce Stress in Breast Cancer Patients
CAREGIVING
Critically Ill Patients Lack Vitamin D
Transition From Home to Hospital Rarely Seamless
Study Links Pesticides to Birth Defects
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
Salt Boosts Blood Pressure in High-Risk Patients
Varicose Veins May Mask Larger Problem
Vitamins Do Older Women Little Good
COSMETIC
Get Sugared!.... Its a sweet choice for hair removal
Mouse Study Finds Molecule That Tells Hair to Grow
Gum Chewing May Cut Craving for Snacks
DENTAL, ORAL
Rheumatoid Arthritis May Harm Gums
An Oral Approach to Heart Disease
Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
DIABETES
Diabetes Linked to Cognitive Problems
Abnormal Heart Rhythm Boosts Death Risk for Diabetics
Patients' Photos Help Boost Radiologists' Accuracy
DIET, NUTRITION
Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
Vitamin D May Help Keep Aging at Bay
The Best Diet? That Depends on You
DISABILITIES
Could Your Cell Phone Help Shield You From Alzheimer's?
Review Finds Marijuana May Help MS Patients
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Fish in U.S. Rivers Tainted With Common Medications
Years of Exposure to Traffic Pollution Raises Blood Pressure
Climate Change Could Sting Allergy, Asthma Sufferers
EYE CARE, VISION
Just Like Skin, Eyes Can 'Burn' in Strong Sun
Nearly 18 Million Will Have Macular Degeneration by 2050
Contact Lens Cases Often Contaminated
FITNESS
Be Healthy, Spend Less
Meditation May Help Put Primary Insomnia to Bed
Want to Stop Cancer? You Can, Experts Say
GASTROINTESTINAL PROBLEMS
Soothing Imagery May Help Rid Some Kids of Stomach Pain
HRT Use Raises Risk of Stomach Trouble
New Yogurt May Ease Stomach Ulcers
GENERAL HEALTH
Parents Influence Sex Decisions, Hispanic Teens Say
Household Insecticides May Be Linked to Autoimmune Diseases
Keep Fire Safety in Mind as You Celebrate
HEAD & NECK
Ski Helmets Encouraged for All
Zen May Thicken Brain, Thwart Pain
Many Children Will Outgrow Headaches
HEALTH & TECHNOLOGY
Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works
Combating Myths About Seasonal Allergies
E-Mailing Your Way to Healthier Habits
HEARING
Summer Sounds Can Lead to Hearing Loss
Noise Hurts Men's Hearing More, Study Shows
HEART & CARDIOVASCULAR
Too-Low Blood Pressure Can Also Bring Danger
Too Much Red Meat May Shorten Life Span
Polyunsaturated Fats Really May Lower Heart Risk
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Poor Restroom Cleaning Causes Cruise-Ship Sickness
Older Adults May Have Some Immunity to Swine Flu
More Medicinal Uses for Pomegranate
INFERTILITY
Obesity May Affect Fertility in Young Womene
KID'S HEALTH
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Exercise in Adolescence May Cut Risk of Deadly Brain Tumor
Exercise During Pregnancy Keeps Newborn Size Normal
MEN'S HEALTH
Eating Fast Until Full Triples Overweight Risk
Could Chinese Herb Be a Natural Viagra?
Strenuous Daily Workout May Keep Cancer at Bay
MENTAL HEALTH
Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
Green Spaces Boost the Body and the Mind
The Acne Drug Accutane More Than Doubles Depression Risk
PAIN
Alleviating Rheumatoid Arthritis
Are We Exercising Pain Away? Not So Much.
'Cell Phone Elbow' -- A New Ill for the Wired Age
PHYSICAL THERAPY
PREGNANCY
Mom's Extra Pregnancy Pounds May Raise Child's Heart Risks
Alternative Treatments May Boost IVF Success
Music of Mozart Soothes the Preemie Baby
SENIORS
The Healthy Habits of Centenarians
Money May Matter, Health-Wise, in Old Age
As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex
SEXUAL HEALTH
SLEEP DISORDERS
Exercising Throat Muscles May Relieve Sleep Apnea
Sleeping Could Help Women Lose The Baby Fat
Lose Weight, Sleep Apnea May Improve
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Air Pollution Slows Women's Marathon Times
Natural Therapies for Menopause
Acupuncture May Help Relieve Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Add your Article

Gene-Transfer Proves Safe for Vision Problem

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Three people with a rare, incurable form of hereditary blindness regained some sight after receiving experimental gene therapy, a new report says.

The patients, all in their early 20s, have Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 (LCA2), a disease in which photoreceptor cells cannot respond to light, because a gene called RPE65 does not properly produce a protein necessary for healthy vision.

In the study, published online in Human Gene Therapy, researchers at the University of Florida used an adeno-associated virus. an apparently harmless virus that already exists in most people. to deliver RPE65 to a small area of the retina.

The subjects said the vision in their treated eyes was slightly improved in dim lighting conditions.

"The patients report seeing brighter areas and perhaps some images, but basically the message is that this treatment is fully safe," William W. Hauswirth, a professor of ophthalmology and member of the university's Powell Gene Therapy Center, said in a news release issued by the university.

No ill effects, other than routine post-surgical soreness, were reported.

"The study has partially restored vision in three young adults, and it demonstrates that gene therapy can be effective in treating human vision disease," Dr. Paul A. Sieving, director of the National Eye Institute, which supported the experiment, said in the same news release. "Many human diseases are inherited in families and result from mutations in single genes. These genetic conditions are particularly suited to potential treatment by gene therapy. This trial to treat vision loss from the condition of Leber congenital amaurosis is an important demonstration of proof of principle and shows that we are on the right track. We can now invest in further work to refine, and ultimately to expand, genetic treatment approaches."

A detailed examination of the therapy's effectiveness in the treated portion of the eye was expected to be published in an upcoming issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

LCA2 affects about 2,000 people in the United States and is one of several incurable forms of blindness collectively known as retinitis pigmentosa, which in turn affects about 200,000 Americans.

More information

The Prevent Blindness America has more about retinitis pigmentosa .



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Florida, news release, September 2008

Last Updated: Sept. 12, 2008

Copyright 2008 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.

More articles at www.eholistic.com